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northerness

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  • grannygreek
    Hi everyone! I m not new to this group, but I am a bit of a lurker (sorry!), so I ll introduce myself. My name is Jenny Irvine, I m 19 and I live in Northern
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 9, 2002
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      Hi everyone! I'm not new to this group, but I am a bit of a lurker
      (sorry!), so I'll introduce myself. My name is Jenny Irvine, I'm 19
      and I live in Northern Ireland.

      I was wondering if someone could help me. I'm writing a story at the
      minute and the setting is Northern (I guess I'd say it was the
      ancient North of Ireland at a push, but really just the North in
      general). My particular feeling on mythology and the North would be
      that it is harsh, but very real, and the mythology is embedded deep
      in the conciousness of the people, in fact it is so deep that it
      seems to reside in the very ground itself.

      These are just my own views and I have not been able to find any
      other theories on the relationship between the two - I'm not sure
      where to look! But just recently, it was mentioned in one of the
      posts that CS Lewis had some views on Northerness. I would really
      appreciate it if someone could tell me what those views were -
      whether they be on mythology or not, and also where i could read more
      on the subject.

      Thanks very much in advance!
      Jenny
    • David S. Bratman
      ... More at http://users.etown.edu/d/DOWNINDC/scifi.htm See also the book _Surprised by Joy_, quoted from in the above. So his sense of Northernness was
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 9, 2002
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        David Downing (a Lewis scholar) writes:

        >Lewis's experiences of Joy came to be associated with three constellations
        >of images which he labeled Northernness, the island garden, and Homeliness.
        >The first of these, "Northernness," was a nameless longing associated with
        >pale winter skies, heroic Norse sagas, and Wagnerian opera. In his
        >autobiography, he vividly recalls the first time he read Longfellow's
        >translations of Icelandic myth, reading the simple words, "Balder the
        >beautiful is dead, is dead," and feeling overwhelmed by "unsatisfied desire
        >which is itself more desirable than any other satisfaction" (Joy 17-18).
        >
        >Throughout his life Lewis possessed an intense attraction to "Northernness,"
        >which he describe as a stern and ecstatic vision of things "cold, spacious,
        >severe, pale, and remote" (Joy 17)

        More at http://users.etown.edu/d/DOWNINDC/scifi.htm

        See also the book _Surprised by Joy_, quoted from in the above.

        So his sense of Northernness was associated more with Norse mythology than
        with Northern Ireland, though that is where he lived as a child.

        David Bratman
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