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Re: [mythsoc] web content

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  • trudygshaw
    ... From: odzer@aol.com To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, April 15, 2002 4:57 PM Subject: [mythsoc] web content ... Frontier Foundation and Harvard,
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 15, 2002
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: odzer@...
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, April 15, 2002 4:57 PM
      Subject: [mythsoc] web content


      > Just fyi, I came across a site, (a joint project of the Electronic
      Frontier Foundation and Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, and University of San
      Francisco law school clinics.)

      >http://www.chillingeffects.org/index.cgi



      At the site odzer mentioned, I ran across an item that made me wonder even more about something that's puzzled me for some time: why artwork based on a particular world/story/distinctive character doesn't seem to be treated the same as derivative fiction. On the "Chilling Effects" site was a copy of a cease and desist letter sent by Anne McCaffrey's lawyers to the person running a website called "Dee's Dragonriders Art Gallery." The language of the letter was the same as could be sent to a "fanfic" site, citing copyright infringement and derivative works. Does anyone know if this has ever been applied to Tolkien- or Lewis-related artwork? "Dee" was selling the art, but isn't that also true of many of the artists who create works based on Middle-earth or Narnia? I know some of the artwork is requested/commissioned as illustrations, but certainly not all of it.

      --Trudy


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