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MFA nominees: Willis, PASSAGE

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    This one is quite interesting but had two faults imho. If you want to be surprised by it, read no further S P O I L E R S P A C E S Starts very slow, with a
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 7 7:51 PM
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      This one is quite interesting but had two faults imho. If you want to be
      surprised by it, read no further

      S
      P
      O
      I
      L
      E
      R

      S
      P
      A
      C
      E
      S

      Starts very slow, with a lot of unnecessary detail (particularly how they got
      around that hospital).

      Could be a straight novel, not a fantasy, or even science fiction. It does
      have a presently unknown scientific experiment, so you =could= say that makes
      it sf. But all the strange events in it happen, to all appearances, inside
      the mind, though (for unknown reasons) they are described as more "real" than
      dreams.

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • Pauline J. Alama
      I will reply below Diamond s spoiler spaces -- see below. Pauline J. Alama THE EYE OF NIGHT (Bantam Spectra, July 2002) ... I think there was a point in all
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 8 2:03 PM
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        I will reply below Diamond's spoiler spaces -- see below.

        Pauline J. Alama
        THE EYE OF NIGHT
        (Bantam Spectra, July 2002)


        --- On Sun 04/07, wrote:
        > This one is quite interesting but had two faults imho. If you want to be
        > surprised by it, read no further
        >
        > S
        > P
        > O
        > I
        > L
        > E
        > R
        >
        > S
        > P
        > A
        > C
        > E
        > S
        >
        > Starts very slow, with a lot of unnecessary detail (particularly how they
        > got
        > around that hospital).

        I think there was a point in all the seemingly gratuitous slapstick about getting lost in the hospital: it's a metaphor for the roundabout paths the neurological "message" has to take in order to get to the parts of the brain that can trigger recovery from the Near Death Experience. Granted, this metaphor doesn't pay off until quite late in the book, by which time an impatient reader may have given up. However, I found the characters interesting enough to keep reading even when I didn't understand why they had to spend so much time complaining about the awkward geograpy of the hospital.
        >
        > Could be a straight novel, not a fantasy, or even science fiction. It
        > does
        > have a presently unknown scientific experiment, so you =could= say that
        > makes
        > it sf. But all the strange events in it happen, to all appearances,
        > inside
        > the mind, though (for unknown reasons) they are described as more
        > "real" than
        > dreams.

        I agree that its genre is not clearly mythopoeic fantasy, despite Diane Joy Baker's well-expressed arguments for including it in the genre. _Passage_ seems to me to fit more precisely in the category of either near-future science fiction or contemporary medical thriller.
        >
        > Diamond Proudbrook
        >
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