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RE: [mythsoc] Happy V.M. Day/Easter

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  • dianejoy@earthlink.net
    Now, to add *another* monkey wrench into the pile, does anyone know how the *Celts* counted the date of Easter? There was a dust-up about that which ended at
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 27, 2002
      Now, to add *another* monkey wrench into the pile, does anyone know how the *Celts* counted the date of Easter? There was a dust-up about that which ended at the Synod of Whitby. Just curious. ---djb

      << The formula for calculating Easter is spelled out in Bede's History of the English Church, & I think that method still holds. The full moon must be past, because (Bede says) when the moon is waning (from the perspective of earth), that means the moon is turning its face toward heaven. So if the first full moon of spring is on a Sunday, Easter takes place on the following Sunday, when the moon is waning. >>







      --- On Tue 03/26, Lisa Deutsch Harrigan <lisa@...> wrote:

      > Although Easter is indirectly linked to Passover (the Last Supper is First

      > Night Sader after all), the modern link is less direct. Christians use a

      > formula with the moons. Eastern Orthodox uses the old formula and the old

      > calendar, which is why they are so far off from the Western dates. But

      > the

      > principal is the same. The Old Formula is the First Full Moon after the

      > Equinox

      > and After Passover (I just looked it up). But there has been much

      > controversy

      > and fiddling.

      >

      > Passover is set by a date on a lunar calendar, which is run by a formula

      > which

      > is close to but not the actual lunar phase. So although the date for

      > Passover

      > floats around on the Gregorian Calendar, the date is fixed on the Hebrew

      > calendar. In fact, since the dates for all Jewish festivals are fixed on

      > the

      > Jewish Calendar, many Jewish homes have a dual calendar showing Gregorian

      > and

      > Jewish dates on it. It kinda like running English and Metric at the same

      > time.

      > You get used to it. I've been known to have one (though these days, I just

      > go

      > to a website I know and download the information into my Lotus

      > Organizer).

      >

      > By the way, on the two websites I went to the only fixed date they showed

      > for

      > Easter was March 27. Though they did comment that different groups had set

      > the

      > date differently and that's why there have been many conflicting rulings

      > on it.

      >

      > The British have a law that states the Easter will be the first Sunday

      > after

      > the second Saturday in April because they hated the wide variance in

      > dates, but

      > it hasn't helped.

      >

      > And I thought having Jewish holidays float on a Western Calendar was

      > confusing.

      > It's simple compared to this Easter Mess!

      >

      > I'm just glad I'm not Muslim. Their calendar literally starts the new

      > month

      > with a sighting of the new moon! No formulas for them!

      >

      > Mythically yours,

      >

      > Lisa.

      >

      > SusanPal@... wrote:

      >

      > > In a message dated 02-03-26 15:02:17 EST, you write:

      > >

      > > << Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover, and there was no

      > Judaism back

      > > then,

      > > which would make it difficult. >>

      > >

      > > It's also linked to the first full moon after the equinox -- or

      > something

      > > like that; I don't have my Book of Common Prayer with me to check --

      > so you

      > > can calculate the date even without reference to Passover.

      > >

      >

      >

      >

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    • Stolzi@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/27/02 10:26:43 AM Central Standard Time, ... * ... Diane, this page http://www.wilfrid.com/Wilfrid_pilgrimage/Whitby_synod.htm talks about
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 27, 2002
        In a message dated 3/27/02 10:26:43 AM Central Standard Time,
        dianejoy@... writes:

        > Now, to add *another* monkey wrench into the pile, does anyone know how the
        *
        > Celts* counted the date of Easter?

        Diane, this page http://www.wilfrid.com/Wilfrid_pilgrimage/Whitby_synod.htm
        talks about it, but it looks to me like the records are somewhat unclear.
        Here are a couple relevant paragraphs:

        "Wilfrid then named all the major places in the world that the Roman method
        was adopted and intimated that it was only the Picts and the British who
        obstinately did otherwise and were 'foolishly attempting to fight against the
        whole world.' Colman objected to Wilfrid saying that they were foolish citing
        that they followed the apostle reckoned worthy to recline on the breast of
        the Lord (John).

        "At this Wilfrid pulled one of several rabbits out of his hat for he
        explained that actually John celebrated Easter according to the decrees of
        Mosaic law from the evening of the 14th day of the first month (Nisan)
        irrespective of whether it fell on the Sabbath or not, whereas the Celtic
        calculation made Easter the first Sunday between the 14th and 20th day of the
        first moon. Wilfrid explained that the Roman calculation was based on Peter's
        preaching in Rome where he waited for the rising of the moon on the 14th day
        of the first moon and if in the morning it was the Lord's day, then Easter
        was on that day, if not, he waited for the first Sunday up to the 21st and
        began the Easter ceremonies the night before so it came about that Easter
        Sunday was kept on the first Sunday between the 15th and the 21st day of the
        first moon. Wilfrid then faced Colman and said 'in your calculation you
        follow neither John or Peter, neither the law nor the Gospel.' "

        Diamond Proudbrook
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