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Re: Fwd: Burning Books for Witchcraft

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  • michael_martinez2
    The Bible only proscribes seeking knowledge outside of the path laid down by God. It s an act of rebellion (a sin, usually punishable by death under the
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 15, 2002
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      The Bible only proscribes seeking knowledge outside of the path laid
      down by God. It's an act of rebellion (a sin, usually punishable by
      death under the Mosaic Law) against God to seek direction or wisdom
      from an unGodly source. Mediums, sorcerors, witches, et. al., are
      usually portrayed in the Bible as deriving their power from spirits
      other than God.

      The Biblical point of view has often been distorted through the
      centuries, of course. Many Pagans/Wiccans rail against Biblical
      proscriptions against their practices. "We're not evil", they say.
      But, from the Bible's point of view, if you're not looking to God for
      direction, you're rejecting him, and rejecting God is evil (or, at
      the very least, not good).

      Where Christians have fallen off the Biblical track regarding Harry
      Potter, the Narnia books, and even in some cases Tolkien, is that
      they have confused any use of the word "magic" with a reliance upon
      some spirit other than God. Tolkien's use of the word was based on
      linguistic principle, not vulgar conceptions. All the good
      characters in Tolkien who use "magic" are, in fact, using a God-given
      native ability, which he usually called a sub-creational faculty.
      The kids in Harry Potter all appear to be using native abilities,
      too. They are born with their abilities, and by implication those
      abilities are given to them by God (because only God can grant such
      power).

      The Mosaic Law was pretty stringent about requiring people to stay in
      line. The Israelites had, of course, settled among tribes and
      nations who did not worship God (or, the God of the Bible). People
      question whether God should or needs to be jealous. I think that
      gets into long convoluted arguments about how much evil God obligates
      himself to tolerate. But many (if not most) Fundamentalist
      Christians have managed to ignore the New Testament's stipulation
      that we are no longer subject to the Law of God, but rather to the
      Spirit. "Vengeance is mine, says the Lord. I will repay". We're
      pretty much expected not to be running around and drowning witches.

      Regrettably, that part of the Bible hasn't been understood for about
      2,000 years, give or take a few generations.

      As far as the fantasy books go, it might be reasonably argued that
      reading such literature detracts from learning about God, but even
      the New Testament authors admonished their peers to be open to the
      truth and tolerance. Education is as important to the Christian mind
      as to any other mind. But Christian Fundamentalism seems to have
      missed the whole point of the Bible.

      It's very sadly ironic.
    • Christine Howlett
      My housemate, a paramedic, says two buddies of hers have gotten seriously into the Left Behind series. One is a born-again Christian who looks on this like a
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 15, 2002
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        My housemate, a paramedic, says two buddies of hers have gotten seriously
        into the Left Behind series. One is a born-again Christian who looks on
        this like a script from the Bible, and the other is a sci-fi freak who says
        its great fantasy stuff. She also says the two are so different in every
        way that she's almost tempted to read the book just to see what it is they
        could agree on!

        P.S. She *has* read the Red Tent and highly recommends it as probably the
        best book she's read since high school (many thousands of books ago!)
        Christine

        -----Original Message-----
        From: ERATRIANO@... <ERATRIANO@...>
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Friday, February 15, 2002 3:17 PM
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Trying that forward again!


        ><< Both the idea that the gathering darkness in the Harry Potter books will
        >make
        > them more offensive to book-burners and the idea that it will make it more
        > acceptable presuppose that said book-burners read the books or pay close
        > attention to the comments of those who do. I wouldn't take that for
        granted.
        > >>
        >
        >Oh guilty here... I am leery of the very idea of the Left Behind books...
        and
        >haven't read any. "We're saved and you're not, neener neener neener."
        >
        >Lizzie
        >
        >
        >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Berni Phillips
        From: ... and ... I ve read a few of the Left Behind books, and they really don t have that attitude. The whole point is that these are
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 15, 2002
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          From: <ERATRIANO@...>
          >
          > Oh guilty here... I am leery of the very idea of the Left Behind books...
          and
          > haven't read any. "We're saved and you're not, neener neener neener."
          >
          > Lizzie

          I've read a few of the Left Behind books, and they really don't have that
          attitude. The whole point is that these are people who were left behind
          because, at the time, they thought those who were taken were religious nuts.
          The heroes of the books all convert afterwards so they understand the
          resistance that many have to Christianity, having had that so recently
          themselves.

          On the other hand, I wouldn't really recommend these books unless you want
          brain candy. They're almost all dialogue and action. They read very fast
          but they're not well-written. It's like reading a movie.

          Berni
        • Trudy Shaw
          ... From: SusanPal@aol.com To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, February 15, 2002 11:09 AM Subject: [mythsoc] Trying that forward again! ... baffled by an
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 16, 2002
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: SusanPal@...
            To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, February 15, 2002 11:09 AM
            Subject: [mythsoc] Trying that forward again!


            >A good friend of mine, the principal of a charter school in Newark, NJ, was
            baffled by an evangelical mother's objection to including _The Lion, the
            Witch, and the Wardrobe_ on the syllabus, on the grounds that it was satanic
            because it included a witch.

            This happened in a small town in western Nebraska a few years back, when the school was going to put on "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" as a play. I remember commenting at that time that: 1) sometimes it's obvious that people haven't read the book they're talking about; and 2) it should have been the *non-Christians* doing the complaining (although, admittedly, there's often a shortage of non-Christians in small ranching communities).
            --Trudy


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