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Re: [mythsoc] Poor old Harry...

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    BTW, Animal Farm is banned by the UAE, it seems, not so much for the political message as because some of the main characters are PIGS, and they drink
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 13, 2002
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      BTW, "Animal Farm" is banned by the UAE, it seems, not so much for the
      political message as because some of the main characters are PIGS, and they
      drink ALCOHOL.

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • dianejoy@earthlink.net
      ...
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 14, 2002
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        Original Message:
        -----------------

        << Hey, it's been burned by some Christians here in the States, hasn't it?
        (Perhaps that's already been discussed here.) >>

        By some Christians, yes. Aarrgghh!

        Then there are sincere, intelligent and lovely Christian folk who think that using a friendly dragon in a fantasy setting (to help Liam Rhenford, an informal detective of sorts, to solve murders) is a harbinger of the New Age world-view. (I shudder to think what other well-used tropes of fantasy would bring to mind. Telepathy, for instance.) Sigh. Those of us who have read *real* New Age stuff know how seriously they take it! Daniel Hood (the alleged perpatrator) is nothing more than a New York layout person who recently lost his job at his newspaper because of Sept. 11. ACK! ---djb

        << I myself have curious
        reactions to HP for generic reasons; I enjoy the books, but feel that
        formally, they're mysteries rather than fantasy. >>

        I see your point. It does seem to be a lot of puzzle solving, along with all the fun events that happen at the magic school, and the release of getting to see poor Harry finally get some love and affection.

        << This begins to change in the fourth book, where there's more sense of darkness and of genuine, dangerous magic (previously, the magic tends to operate as a spiritually neutral technology); she ends the fourth book where LotR begins, of course, with the Dark Lord returning to power. So it will be interesting to see where the series goes from here. >>

        Definitely. I am sure that the gathering darkness will alarm the usual suspects.

        << But banning books . . . ! Horrors! It makes me think of the conversation Gandalf has with Frodo about Gollum: "Even the wisest cannot foresee all ends." Even if we personally dislike certain books, how can we say they won't ultimately do good in the world? >>

        Even if all the good they do is to provide a few hours of amusement, and keep the person away from TV. That's something!

        <<Not to mention the First Amendment. <g> >>

        Not as secure as it once was (IMHO) if certain bills got passed last night, but that's off topic.

        << Well, and I've now revealed myself as a Thoroughly Opinionated Person!>>

        Just like all of us! ---djb



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      • SusanPal@aol.com
        In a message dated 2/14/2002 8:09:04 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... If you re talking about the book-burners -- well, not necessarily. I read a story about
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 14, 2002
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          In a message dated 2/14/2002 8:09:04 AM Pacific Standard Time,
          dianejoy@... writes:


          > Definitely. I am sure that the gathering darkness will alarm the usual
          > suspects.

          If you're talking about the book-burners -- well, not necessarily. I read a
          story about various conservative Christian groups (and I'm Christian myself,
          so I mean so offense here, although my own flavor is liberal Episcopalian)
          who actually came out in SUPPORT of Lord of the Rings because a) it's about a
          clearly-defined battle between good and evil, b) it's written by an orthodox
          Christian (although Rowling's Church of Scotland herself) and c) Gandalf
          isn't a wizard, he's an archangel. So I wonder if HP might be *more*
          acceptable to that camp when it becomes even more clearly a standoff between
          He Who Must Not Be Named and the forces of light.

          Susan


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