Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Literary Wonders

Expand Messages
  • David S. Bratman
    Some sort of readers poll (details not given in the article I read) has chosen the Eight Literary Wonders of the World for a new publication series by Penguin
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 3, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Some sort of readers' poll (details not given in the article I read) has
      chosen the Eight Literary Wonders of the World for a new publication series
      by Penguin Books. Candidates were limited to works written before 1930,
      which leaves Tolkien out of it this time, but I was interested by the
      choices, which - again this isn't clear if it was intentional or not -
      represent eight literary cultures:

      1. Homer, The Odyssey (Greek)
      2. Virgil, The Aeneid (Roman)
      3. Dante, Inferno (Italian)
      4. Cervantes, Don Quixote (Spanish)
      5. Shakespeare, Hamlet (English)
      6. Goethe, Faust (German)
      7. Flaubert, Madame Bovary (French)
      8. Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Russian)

      What's particularly interesting is the predominance of fantasy. Don
      Quixote is borderline, but if it's included, six of the eight (and all six
      predating 1850) are what we would call fantasies of one sort or another.
    • NiffMarie@cs.com
      In a message dated 12/3/2001 5:23:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... This is a fascinating list, and I ve read most of them. Why would Madame Bovary be on the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 3, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 12/3/2001 5:23:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        dbratman@... writes:

        > 1. Homer, The Odyssey (Greek)
        > 2. Virgil, The Aeneid (Roman)
        > 3. Dante, Inferno (Italian)
        > 4. Cervantes, Don Quixote (Spanish)
        > 5. Shakespeare, Hamlet (English)
        > 6. Goethe, Faust (German)
        > 7. Flaubert, Madame Bovary (French)
        > 8. Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (Russian)

        This is a fascinating list, and I've read most of them. Why would Madame
        Bovary be on the list? I read that story, and -hated- it. I refused to finish
        it, even though it was for a class and I found out the ending anyway.

        --Niff, infj
        NiffMarie@...
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing."
        Cicero
      • Bill
        Well, as I recall, Cervantes was writing a satire of the popular fantasies such as Amadis of Gaul and Palmerin of England , so I d include it. David S. Bratman
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 8, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Well, as I recall, Cervantes was writing a satire of the
          popular fantasies
          such as Amadis of Gaul and Palmerin of England , so I'd
          include it.

          David S. Bratman wrote:
          What's particularly interesting is the predominance of
          fantasy. Don
          Quixote is borderline, but if it's included, six of the eight
          (and all six
          predating 1850) are what we would call fantasies of one sort
          or another.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.