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RE: [mythsoc] Hattocks and other matters

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  • dianejoy@earthlink.net
    ... In a message dated 10/26/2001 12:12:52 PM Central Daylight Time, dbratman@stanford.edu writes:
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 27, 2001
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      Original Message:
      ----------------

      In a message dated 10/26/2001 12:12:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
      dbratman@... writes:

      <<One had thought of women students in the UK as being much stronger-minded,
      along Dorothy Sayers lines, but one could always be wrong.>>

      I would hope so, esp. given that in that era, they were only beginning to relax standards in the name of rad-chic.

      << On another line entirely: I cd not communicate online Friday, being on a
      trip, but picked up the USAToday newspaper for that day at breakfast to find
      a very interesting article on the various UK locations for filming used in
      the HARRY POTTER movie. If you can still get your hands on it, take a look. >>

      The HP film looks like it's got a good cast; Alan Rickman is Snape, and Kenneth Brannagh (sp?) has signed to play a major character in HP2.

      << The article was otherwise good but made a startling statement about the
      Bodleian Library containing "a copy of every book ever printed." Surely this cannot be true? >>

      I'm figuring the reporter doesn't read much and freaked out at the sight of so many books.

      On another matter, does anybody have an idea what the word HATTOCK means?
      I'm reading *The Ill Made Mute* by Cecilia Dart-Thornton. Really enjoying it so far, partially because CDT doesn't dumb down her language, and sends me to the dictionary---something I haven't had to do for quite some time.

      But I'm afraid she's stumped me on one word: my dictionaries don't contain *hattock* and I could not find it, even in my trusty old New American, which often has weird words in it (the reason I keep it). I found several references to HATTOCK online as a gathering or assemblage of sheaves---but CDT uses the word as a verb as well as a noun. It also seems to be associated with horses: "Horse and hattock" is used by fairies to make rye stems into vessels of transport/ flight. It's also associated with Wicca, it seems. Wondered if it might be an Austrailian word, since CDT is from "Down Under," but now, I'm convinced it's just a very old English word. I'm sure Alexei can help me out, but I'll thank anyone who can solve this mystery. Thanks in advance. ---djb


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    • David S. Bratman
      I guess Wendell, Master of the OED, isn t online today, so I dragged out my print copy. (I only have online access at work.) Hattock, sense 2: a) A shock of
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 27, 2001
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        I guess Wendell, Master of the OED, isn't online today, so I dragged out my
        print copy. (I only have online access at work.)

        Hattock, sense 2: "a) A shock of standing sheaves of corn, the tops of
        which are protected by two sheaves laid along them with their bottoms in
        contact in the centre, and their heads slanting downwards, so as to carry
        off rain. b) The two covering sheaves themselves."

        I hope that makes sense in context. Sense 1 (obs.) is "a little hat",
        which I find much easier to visualize.

        David Bratman


        At 08:28 AM 10/27/2001 , Diane wrote:

        >On another matter, does anybody have an idea what the word HATTOCK means?
        >I'm reading *The Ill Made Mute* by Cecilia Dart-Thornton. Really enjoying
        >it so far, partially because CDT doesn't dumb down her language, and sends
        >me to the dictionary---something I haven't had to do for quite some time.
        >
        >But I'm afraid she's stumped me on one word: my dictionaries don't contain
        >*hattock* and I could not find it, even in my trusty old New American, which
        >often has weird words in it (the reason I keep it). I found several
        >references to HATTOCK online as a gathering or assemblage of sheaves---but
        >CDT uses the word as a verb as well as a noun. It also seems to be
        >associated with horses: "Horse and hattock" is used by fairies to make rye
        >stems into vessels of transport/ flight. It's also associated with Wicca,
        >it seems.
      • WendellWag@aol.com
        In a message dated 10/27/01 9:20:32 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... I am. I just decided to let someone else answer this one, for some random reason. Wendell
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 27, 2001
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          In a message dated 10/27/01 9:20:32 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          dbratman@... writes:


          > I guess Wendell, Master of the OED, isn't online today, so I dragged out my
          > print copy.

          I am. I just decided to let someone else answer this one, for some random
          reason.

          Wendell Wagner


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Stolzi@aol.com
          In a message dated 10/27/2001 10:28:56 AM Central Daylight Time, ... I d think Robbie Coltrane should be perfect as Hagrid, too. Hattock isn t in my Oxford
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 27, 2001
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            In a message dated 10/27/2001 10:28:56 AM Central Daylight Time,
            dianejoy@... writes:

            > The HP film looks like it's got a good cast; Alan Rickman is Snape

            I'd think Robbie Coltrane should be perfect as Hagrid, too.

            "Hattock" isn't in my Oxford Universal Dictionary (the shorter form of the
            OED).

            mary s
          • dianejoy@earthlink.net
            ... Hattock, sense 2: a) A shock of standing sheaves of corn, the tops of which are protected by two sheaves laid along them with their bottoms in contact in
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 29, 2001
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              Original Message:
              -----------------
              Hattock, sense 2: "a) A shock of standing sheaves of corn, the tops of
              which are protected by two sheaves laid along them with their bottoms in
              contact in the centre, and their heads slanting downwards, so as to carry
              off rain. b) The two covering sheaves themselves."

              I hope that makes sense in context. Sense 1 (obs.) is "a little hat",
              which I find much easier to visualize.

              David Bratman


              OK, so I guess, since CDT turns the noun into verb, the horses were gathering in clumps like sheaves, and their heads were leaning over each other's backs. A rather nice image. Especially since these horses are winged.

              Thanks, David. Much appreciate the help. ---djb

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