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lament for oOromir

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  • Grace E. Funk
    Kloczko, Edouard J. ed. “Tolkien en France” (ARDA 1998 ISBN 2-911979-02-8) 8 essays and a bibliography. Among the French attitudes to Tolkien is an
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 1, 2001
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      Kloczko, Edouard J. ed. “Tolkien en France” (ARDA 1998 ISBN
      2-911979-02-8) 8 essays and a bibliography. Among the French attitudes
      to Tolkien is an analysis I have not encountered before. Frederique
      Munier, writing “Une interpretation trifonctionnelle d’un poeme de
      J,R.R.Tolkien” spells out his idea that the three verses of the lament
      over Boromir at the beginning of Book III represent, respectively,
      Aragorn, Legolas and Boromir himself. Thus:
      The West Wind comes “wandering” from “empty lands” over “waters wide
      and grey”- the land of the Rangers which resembles in its traits - cold,
      abstracted, unpeopled - the high severe spirit of the King (Aragorn),
      descendant of the kings of Numenor in the west. The ignorance of the
      west wind indicates that Boromir lacked the high virtue of a king.
      The South Wind comes “sighing”, as the elves sigh, as Legolas sighed.
      Legolas is more inclined to sensibility than to action, hence the
      “wailing” of the gulls, and “moans”, and “grieve”. For the elves, the
      seaevokes a fascination, similar to the fascination men have with the
      idea of death. Legolas himself says, “deep in the hearts of all my
      kindred lies the sea-longing, which it is perilous to stir.” The sea
      represents for Legolas his destiny and the essence of his being. “Grey
      seas” recalls the Grey Elves. [and other associations are given]
      The North Wind’s reply begins with Boromir’s loud horn.The North Wind
      blows “clear and cold” like Boromir’s horn. Boromir was proud; he loved
      fighting, and the use of force; he wanted power; his chief virtue was
      courage. Rather than the men of Gondor, he resembled the Rohirrim,
      warriors who came from the north. The tumultuous waterfall, Rauros, also
      resembles Boromir’s forceful spirit. The last two lines of verse three
      suggest the immortality of a hero in the minds of men.
      A very brief summary of an interesting article.

      --
      Grace E. Funk R.R. #1, Lumby, B.C. V0E 2G0 Phone (250)547-6333
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