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Re: [mythsoc] A truly depressing post

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    In a message dated 8/20/01 8:13:27 PM Central Daylight Time, ... out ... I was promoted instantly into the second grade when they found out I could already
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 21, 2001
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      In a message dated 8/20/01 8:13:27 PM Central Daylight Time,
      tgshaw@... writes:

      > a parent not so much pushing as "showing off" the child, having him read
      out
      > loud to strangers

      I was promoted instantly into the second grade when they found out I could
      already read, and then remember at least one occasion of being taken from my
      second grade room to read to the third-graders and inspire them to shame or
      emulation. Shame, more likely.

      Yuck!

      My mother said she didn't know exactly how I learned to read before entering
      school, but she knew it was using the letters as a code, not "sight-reading,"
      because I would sound out words.

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • NiffMarie@cs.com
      Hi! I don t usually write much - though I enjoy reading all the posts! I do happen to know a bit about giftedness and wanted to add my $0.02. :-) Kids who
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 21, 2001
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        Hi!

        I don't usually write much - though I enjoy reading all the posts!

        I do happen to know a bit about giftedness and wanted to add my $0.02. :-)

        Kids who learn quickly and lots can be of two types: the ones whose parents
        pushed them (I think this might be a bit obvious - the kids are nervous,
        etc), and those who push themselves and learn because they enjoy it. Often,
        if gifted kiddos aren't given enough to stimulate them, it leads to a lot of
        negative emotional experiences and trouble. So it could go either way.

        OTOH, sometimes teachers react to giftedness, thinking reflexively that
        either the parents are too pushy (and it's bad for the child), or thinking
        for other reasons it's not good for kids to be exceptionally advanced. This
        is also damaging, a lot of times. In other cases, though, they are right on -
        sometimes parents do push too hard.

        Anyway, interesting thread! Sorry to interrupt :-)

        --Niff, infj
        NiffMarie@...
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing."
        Cicero
      • Janet Croft
        Absolutely! My husband and I both experienced being understimulated in school, and being looked at askance by our teachers and other students. It was
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 21, 2001
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          Absolutely! My husband and I both experienced being understimulated in
          school, and being looked at askance by our teachers and other students. It
          was emotionally unpleasant, to say the least. Our daughter was held back
          when she tried to work ahead in math in kindergarten, and that's why we've
          home-schooled ever since -- to spare her from anyone saying giftedness made
          her a freak, or that she should act dumb to get boys. (or at least to get
          dumb boys ;))

          Janet
          -----Original Message-----
          From: NiffMarie@... [mailto:NiffMarie@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2001 3:01 PM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] A truly depressing post


          Hi!

          I don't usually write much - though I enjoy reading all the posts!

          I do happen to know a bit about giftedness and wanted to add my $0.02. :-)

          Kids who learn quickly and lots can be of two types: the ones whose
          parents
          pushed them (I think this might be a bit obvious - the kids are nervous,
          etc), and those who push themselves and learn because they enjoy it.
          Often,
          if gifted kiddos aren't given enough to stimulate them, it leads to a lot
          of
          negative emotional experiences and trouble. So it could go either way.

          OTOH, sometimes teachers react to giftedness, thinking reflexively that
          either the parents are too pushy (and it's bad for the child), or thinking
          for other reasons it's not good for kids to be exceptionally advanced.
          This
          is also damaging, a lot of times. In other cases, though, they are right
          on -
          sometimes parents do push too hard.

          Anyway, interesting thread! Sorry to interrupt :-)

          --Niff, infj
          NiffMarie@...
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing."
          Cicero

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        • alexeik@aol.com
          In a message dated 8/21/1 7:29:39 PM, Mary wrote:
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 21, 2001
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            In a message dated 8/21/1 7:29:39 PM, Mary wrote:

            <<My mother said she didn't know exactly how I learned to read before
            entering
            school, but she knew it was using the letters as a code, not "sight-reading,"
            because I would sound out words.
            >>

            I also learned to read by myself when I was about three. I wonder how
            widespread a phenomenon that actually is? I first learned to read Cyrillic,
            and then learned the Latin alphabet by comparing the phonetic values of the
            letters to the alphabet I already knew. All this was long before I went to
            school.
            Alexei
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