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Re: [Sales of Lewiss books]

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  • WendellWag@xxx.xxx
    In a message dated 7/16/99 2:10:39 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... would see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . . The presence of that kind of book
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 16 1:50 AM
      In a message dated 7/16/99 2:10:39 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
      shield333@... writes:

      > I daresay that I completely understand why there would be some people that
      would > see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . . The presence of
      that kind of book > in a bohemian area is not surprising,as there are people
      who enjoy this kind of
      > book as entertainment,having not one clue that these are books about events
      more > real than they would really be comfortable believing actually occur.

      Actually, I don't think Kramer Books sells any of Charles Williams's books.
      I think you take the word "bohemian" in a stronger sense than I meant it.
      Like Greenwich Village in New York, Dupont Circle is now a little too
      expensive to live in for real bohemians. The residents are most young
      bureaucrats who don't want to live in the suburbs and like being right next
      to good bookstores, theaters, museums, etc. My point was that a store in
      such a neighborhood that's not remotely a religious bookstore still sells a
      lot of Lewis's books, making me think that Lewis's readership is rather
      mainstream these days.
    • Steve Schaper
      ... The Order of the Golden Dawn does tend to strike me as being occult, to the very limited extent that I have any knowledge of it. ... Hard to define
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 16 5:31 AM
        At 4:50 AM -0400 7/16/99, WendellWag@... wrote:
        >
        >> I daresay that I completely understand why there would be some people that
        >would > see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . .

        The Order of the Golden Dawn does tend to strike me as being occult,
        to the very limited extent that I have any knowledge of it.


        > My point was that a store in
        >such a neighborhood that's not remotely a religious bookstore still sells a
        >lot of Lewis's books, making me think that Lewis's readership is rather
        >mainstream these days.


        Hard to define 'mainstream' in America these days. There seem to be
        two main streams in collision.

        I talked with an editor for a major Christian publishing house last
        year, and he complained to me that he cannot get the good fiction
        published - the Christian public will not buy good fiction in
        Christian book stores, though they -do- go to the general book stores
        and buy it. Lawhead (who is getting better at his craft) has made the
        transition, but others, like Willis, have not. Which leaves us
        reading Gresham, Stephenson and Helprin for good, thoughtful fiction.
        That isn't all bad, but the dichotomy isn't, IMHO, a good thing.

        --Steve
        ======================================
        It's 1999, where's Moonbase Alpha?
        ======================================
      • WendellWag@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 7/16/99 8:32:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... would see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . . Um, please note that I was quoting
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 16 8:12 AM
          In a message dated 7/16/99 8:32:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
          sschaper@... writes:

          > At 4:50 AM -0400 7/16/99, WendellWag@... wrote:
          > I daresay that I completely understand why there would be some people that
          would > see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . .

          Um, please note that I was quoting from shield333@... (Hal May).

          Wendell Wagner
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