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Re: [Sales of Lewiss books]

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  • Hal May
    WendellWag@aol.com wrote: From: WendellWag@aol.com In a message dated 7/13/99 5:29:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... it had to do ... the ... I ve heard of
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 15, 1999
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      WendellWag@... wrote:
      From: WendellWag@...

      In a message dated 7/13/99 5:29:03 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      shield333@... writes:

      > However, much to my shock, I recently heard someone call MacDonald's work a
      > little too "new age" for her. After a lengthy discussion she agreed that
      it had to do
      > with some personal perceptions that might be a little skewed, rather than
      the
      > actual work of MacDonald, itself.

      I've heard of people who think that Charles Williams's books flirt with
      occultism.
      In any case, we've established that some religious bookstores are rather
      lightweight. Can people tell me how well Lewis's books sell in non-religious

      bookstores? What surprised me was not only that there were only about 10 of
      Lewis's books in the religious bookstore I checked (a Family Books in the
      Laurel Center Mall), but that there were about 120 of his books (counting
      books about him) in the largest of the Washington(DC)-area bookstores (the
      Borders in White Flint Mall). This was quite a satisfactory selection of
      Lewis's books, I thought.

      The bigger surprise to me was that there was 20 of his books at Kramer Books
      and Afterwords, a hip latenight bookstore/cafe in the Dupont Circle
      neighborhood in D.C., which was as many books as any author in their
      philosophy/religion section. This store is in a neighborhood that likes to
      think of itself as bohemian (and being in D.C., it also tries to appeal to
      policy wonks). Historical note: It was one of the two bookstores subpoened
      by Ken Starr for a list of books bought by Monica Lewinsky. (The other was
      the Barnes & Noble in Georgetown.)

      So while some religious bookstores are a little lightweight, it looks to me
      like some mainstream bookstores are not lightweight. That's why I wonder if
      Lewis's readership is now perceived as being mainstream.

      Wendell Wagner
      I daresay that I completely understand why there would be
      some people that would see Williams books as flirting with
      occultism.However,the problem is that they are written byu
      someone with an understanding of the REAL supernatural.
      Those with a RELIGIOUS bent would get upset about it due
      to the realism.Too few professing Christians are unac-
      quainted with the real supernatural."Mainstream"thought
      and mainstream churches haven't a real clue what the bap-
      tism of the Holy Spirit means.An intense re-read of "That
      Hideous Strength" by Lewis or "Many Dimensions,""War In
      Heaven,"and "The Greater Trumps" and taking them seriously,
      instead of as merely entertainment gives a clearer under-
      standing of real life than most of the theology books
      availible.There are those of us who have lived lives more
      closely approaching these books who see standard portrayal
      of 'realism' as a pathetic portrayal of life in shades
      of grey,similar to the town waiting in fear,for sunset,
      in Lewis's "The Great Divorce," or L'Engle's world of grey
      people in "A Wrinkle In Time."The war between good and
      evil is not an intellectual abstract.The 'Ecthroi'of
      L'Engle's trilogy exist.(Ecthroi is a Greek word meaning
      enemies who hold a blood vendetta, a personal and bitter
      grudge,against you, much like the Hebrew word, Satan.)
      The presence of that kind of book in a bohemian area is
      not surprising,as there are people who enjoy this kind of
      book as entertainment,having not one clue that these are
      books about events more real than they would really be
      comfortable believing actually occur.Some people like to
      play with fire,never recognizing what it is.The greek word
      for sorcery IS pharmakos,after all.
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    • WendellWag@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 7/16/99 2:10:39 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... would see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . . The presence of that kind of book
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 16, 1999
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        In a message dated 7/16/99 2:10:39 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        shield333@... writes:

        > I daresay that I completely understand why there would be some people that
        would > see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . . The presence of
        that kind of book > in a bohemian area is not surprising,as there are people
        who enjoy this kind of
        > book as entertainment,having not one clue that these are books about events
        more > real than they would really be comfortable believing actually occur.

        Actually, I don't think Kramer Books sells any of Charles Williams's books.
        I think you take the word "bohemian" in a stronger sense than I meant it.
        Like Greenwich Village in New York, Dupont Circle is now a little too
        expensive to live in for real bohemians. The residents are most young
        bureaucrats who don't want to live in the suburbs and like being right next
        to good bookstores, theaters, museums, etc. My point was that a store in
        such a neighborhood that's not remotely a religious bookstore still sells a
        lot of Lewis's books, making me think that Lewis's readership is rather
        mainstream these days.
      • Steve Schaper
        ... The Order of the Golden Dawn does tend to strike me as being occult, to the very limited extent that I have any knowledge of it. ... Hard to define
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 16, 1999
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          At 4:50 AM -0400 7/16/99, WendellWag@... wrote:
          >
          >> I daresay that I completely understand why there would be some people that
          >would > see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . .

          The Order of the Golden Dawn does tend to strike me as being occult,
          to the very limited extent that I have any knowledge of it.


          > My point was that a store in
          >such a neighborhood that's not remotely a religious bookstore still sells a
          >lot of Lewis's books, making me think that Lewis's readership is rather
          >mainstream these days.


          Hard to define 'mainstream' in America these days. There seem to be
          two main streams in collision.

          I talked with an editor for a major Christian publishing house last
          year, and he complained to me that he cannot get the good fiction
          published - the Christian public will not buy good fiction in
          Christian book stores, though they -do- go to the general book stores
          and buy it. Lawhead (who is getting better at his craft) has made the
          transition, but others, like Willis, have not. Which leaves us
          reading Gresham, Stephenson and Helprin for good, thoughtful fiction.
          That isn't all bad, but the dichotomy isn't, IMHO, a good thing.

          --Steve
          ======================================
          It's 1999, where's Moonbase Alpha?
          ======================================
        • WendellWag@xxx.xxx
          In a message dated 7/16/99 8:32:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... would see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . . Um, please note that I was quoting
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 16, 1999
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            In a message dated 7/16/99 8:32:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            sschaper@... writes:

            > At 4:50 AM -0400 7/16/99, WendellWag@... wrote:
            > I daresay that I completely understand why there would be some people that
            would > see Williams books as flirting with occultism. . .

            Um, please note that I was quoting from shield333@... (Hal May).

            Wendell Wagner
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