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Re: Digest Number 657

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  • Michael Martinez
    ... I love Francesca Annis, but in the book Galadriel appears as a young maiden. She just happens to be thousands of years old. To be more faithful to
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 10 8:16 AM
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      --- In mythsoc@y..., WendellWag@a... wrote:
      > It seems to me that all the parts were cast too young. I had
      > thought that Galadriel should be played by some 50-ish bombshell
      > actress - Susan Sarandon, Catherine Deneuve, Francesca Annis, or
      > some such. Having her played by the 30-to 31-year-old (as of the
      > time of the filming) Cate Blanchett is weird.

      I love Francesca Annis, but in the book Galadriel appears as a young
      maiden. She just happens to be thousands of years old.

      To be more faithful to Tolkien, they should have gotten someone about
      20-24 to play Galadriel, but I think they wanted a tinge of maturity.

      I get the impression that Peter Jackson wanted the (principal)
      Hobbits to seem a bit child-like yet mature. Hence, he went for
      young actors. Bilbo, of course, is very old in the story.

      If, as some spy reports suggest, only a few months pass between
      Bilbo's handing on of the Ring and Gandalf's return, it will be a
      major blunder because the effect of the Ring on Frodo's perceived
      longevity will be lost. There is literally no difference
      (technically) between saying "months later" and "17 years later", and
      the only excuse I can imagine might be served up is that they
      couldn't afford to film Hobbiton with two sets of extras (or two sets
      of actors for the principal characters).

      But I am hoping that timeless Frodo will be preserved. That is an
      important part of the story, even if it requires explanation (which
      it often does) for many people. The Ring's effect on Frodo should be
      subtle enough that the movie audiences won't see rapid changes in his
      behavior, but distinct enough that by the time he (presumably) claims
      the Ring, it is understandable that he is no longer in control of
      himself.
    • Michael Martinez
      ... As with so many aspects of Middle-earth, Tolkien changed his mind on the physical appearance of Elves. Hence, we have bearded and ancient Cirdan greeting
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 10 8:22 AM
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        --- In mythsoc@y..., "Trudy Shaw" <tgshaw@e...> wrote:

        > That's something I've always kind of wondered about--if Elves are
        > immortal, do they reach a certain apparent age and then
        > stop "aging," or do they age continuously but very slowly?

        As with so many aspects of Middle-earth, Tolkien changed his mind on
        the physical appearance of Elves. Hence, we have bearded and ancient
        Cirdan greeting the departees at Mithlond and in the last year of his
        life he writes a note saying that the beardlessness of Elves was a
        trait inherited by the Lords of Dol Amroth who were descended from
        Mithrellas.

        In the book, both Galadriel and Arwen have the appearance of young
        maidens.

        The hardest characterization for the actors will probably be Frodo.
        His character undergoes a tremendous stress and change, and he may
        seem very young but he is (in the book) a very mature Hobbit. I
        can't recall when or if anyone has ever gotten an Oscar nomination
        for a fantasy movie performance, but they may have a couple of
        candidates come out of these movies simply because of the demands of
        the roles.
      • Sweet & Tender Hooligan
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        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 10 8:34 AM
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          > I can't recall when or if anyone has ever gotten an Oscar
          > nomination for a fantasy movie performance, but they may
          > have a couple of candidates come out of these movies simply
          > because of the demands of the roles.

          Hah! If the Academy deigns to award even a single /nomination/ to these
          actors, I will eat my hat.

          Ever the pessimist,

          -

          s&th
          cirhsein@...

          If life gives you lemons, squeeze the juice into
          a watergun and shoot other people in the eyes.



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        • Steve Dufour
          ... aging than the men. Elrond certainly looked middle-aged. But then he was half Man. Oh well, good question. I m hoping for several Oscars for the LOTR
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 10 9:47 AM
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            > > > That's something I've always kind of
            wondered > about--if Elves are > > immortal, do they
            reach a certain apparent age and > then > > stop
            "aging," or do they age continuously but very >
            slowly? >.....The ladies seem to show less effects of
            aging than the men. Elrond certainly looked
            middle-aged. But then he was half Man. Oh well, good
            question. I'm hoping for several Oscars for the LOTR
            movies. -Steve

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          • Michael Martinez
            ... They may not want to recognize these actors. We may not get award- worthy performances. But from what I ve been hearing, both publicly and privately, for
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 10 11:22 AM
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              --- In mythsoc@y..., "Sweet & Tender Hooligan" <cirhsein@y...> wrote:
              > > I can't recall when or if anyone has ever gotten an Oscar
              > > nomination for a fantasy movie performance, but they may
              > > have a couple of candidates come out of these movies simply
              > > because of the demands of the roles.
              >
              > Hah! If the Academy deigns to award even a single /nomination/ to
              > these actors, I will eat my hat.

              They may not want to recognize these actors. We may not get award-
              worthy performances. But from what I've been hearing, both publicly
              and privately, for the past year-and-a-half, there have been some
              very good performances.

              And then we have the beloved Liv Tyler screaming and ducking behind
              Viggo as thirty Orcs come charging at her, not mention whacking her
              poor horse with a sword. But, as I pointed out previously, I believe
              the focus of her role in the films has been changed drastically.

              And as long as the horse wasn't hurt, I'd watch her wield a sword any
              day. But that's just me. :)
            • Trudy Shaw
              ... From: Michael Martinez To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, August 10, 2001 10:22 AM Subject: [mythsoc] Re: Digest Number 657 The hardest
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 11 1:19 AM
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                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Michael Martinez
                To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, August 10, 2001 10:22 AM
                Subject: [mythsoc] Re: Digest Number 657


                The hardest characterization for the actors will probably be Frodo.
                His character undergoes a tremendous stress and change, and he may
                seem very young but he is (in the book) a very mature Hobbit. I
                can't recall when or if anyone has ever gotten an Oscar nomination
                for a fantasy movie performance, but they may have a couple of
                candidates come out of these movies simply because of the demands of
                the roles.


                I'd be kind of surprised if any Oscars for acting came out of Fellowship of the Ring (special effects or something like that, pretty likely). By the time we get to Return of the King it would seem more possible as the roles (especially Frodo's) become more demanding as time goes on.

                I'm not familiar with most of the actors, but since I've always had a particular fondness for Frodo--and was concerned about how the part would be handled--for the past year I've been trying to find and watch every Elijah Wood movie I could. I've seen 15 of them now, and am quite optimistic. He's "adequate" in roles that are played more broadly, but he's in his element playing characters who are subtle and interiorized. I may "eat my hat" on this one, but I'm looking forward to seeing what he does with my favorite fictional person.

                --Trudy






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