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Gob's Grief by Chris Adrian

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    A friend who doesn t sub to this List would like comments from any Mythies who have read, or will read, this book. Here s an amazon.com review. Editorial
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 20 8:47 AM
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      A friend who doesn't sub to this List would like comments from any Mythies
      who have read, or will read, this book. Here's an amazon.com review.

      Editorial Reviews
      Amazon.com

      Unlike many a novelist, Chris Adrian isn't intimidated by history. Indeed, he
      treats historical events as raw material, to be reshaped and reconfigured
      through the processes of the imagination. It's an endeavor that would please
      Walt Whitman, one of the central characters in this challenging debut, Gob's
      Grief. Nor is the good gray poet the only "real" character--both Abraham
      Lincoln and radical feminist Victoria Woodhull put in appearances, giving an
      extra twist of verisimilitude to Adrian's rendering of America circa 1863,
      where the Civil War rages and the dead proliferate like weeds.

      Gob's Grief opens with the story of Tomo, the fictional son of Woodhull. At
      age 11, he dreams of escaping Homer, Ohio, to join the fighting. Unable to
      convince his twin brother, Gob, to accompany him, Tomo finally sets out alone
      and is promptly killed by a bullet through the skull. His twin never recovers
      from this loss. In thrall to his grief, Gob grows up to become a doctor,
      dedicating himself to healing the war's wounded. And by night, he toils away
      at a more unlikely corrective: a time machine that will eradicate death and
      bring back all the lost soldiers. His sidekick in this project is none other
      than Whitman, who shares his desire to resurrect those millions of departed
      souls: "Their marvelous passion would go out from them in waves, transforming
      time, history, and destiny, unmurdering Lincoln, unfighting the war,
      unkilling all the six hundred thousand."

      Gob's Grief is an ambitious and occasionally convoluted story, which remains
      true to the stubborn mysticism of thinkers like Whitman and Woodhull. Cutting
      back and forth between characters and historical moments, Adrian never
      pretends to retrospective detachment. Indeed, his novel will appeal to fans
      of John Dos Passos or E.L. Doctorow--writers who borrow from history but
      repay their debt in the form of fictional insight. --Ellen Williams
    • David S. Bratman
      The review makes it sound absolutely hideous. David Bratman
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 20 9:02 AM
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        The review makes it sound absolutely hideous.

        David Bratman
      • Margaret Dean
        ... I dunno, I thought it sounded kind of . . . Falkensteinian. (For those who may not recognize the reference, I m alluding to the Victorian fantasy
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 20 9:11 AM
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          "David S. Bratman" wrote:
          >
          > The review makes it sound absolutely hideous.

          I dunno, I thought it sounded kind of . . . Falkensteinian. (For
          those who may not recognize the reference, I'm alluding to the
          Victorian fantasy roleplaying game "Castle Falkenstein," one of
          my current passions.)


          --Margaret Dean
          <margdean@...>
        • Margaret Dean
          ... No (and that includes the two Falkenstein novels that were published, insofar as I can tell -- I couldn t finish either of em!). But what I meant was
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 20 9:28 AM
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            "David S. Bratman" wrote:
            >
            > At 09:11 AM 4/20/2001 , Margaret Dean wrote:
            >
            > >I dunno, I thought it sounded kind of . . . Falkensteinian. (For
            > >those who may not recognize the reference, I'm alluding to the
            > >Victorian fantasy roleplaying game "Castle Falkenstein," one of
            > >my current passions.)
            >
            > But do novelizations of roleplaying games make good novels? Rarely.

            No (and that includes the two Falkenstein novels that were
            published, insofar as I can tell -- I couldn't finish either of
            'em!). But what I meant was that =atmospherically= it sounded
            similar, which it could certainly do even if the author never
            heard of CF. Victorian fantasy has been rather "in the air"
            lately.


            --Margaret Dean
            <margdean@...>
          • David S. Bratman
            ... But do novelizations of roleplaying games make good novels? Rarely. David Bratman
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 20 10:02 AM
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              At 09:11 AM 4/20/2001 , Margaret Dean wrote:

              >I dunno, I thought it sounded kind of . . . Falkensteinian. (For
              >those who may not recognize the reference, I'm alluding to the
              >Victorian fantasy roleplaying game "Castle Falkenstein," one of
              >my current passions.)

              But do novelizations of roleplaying games make good novels? Rarely.

              David Bratman
            • David S. Bratman
              ... There are Victorian fantasies, and there are Victorian fantasies, just like there are Elves and there are Elves, and there is Robin Hood and there is Robin
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 20 12:30 PM
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                At 09:11 AM 4/20/2001 , Margaret Dean wrote:

                >But what I meant was that =atmospherically= it sounded
                >similar, which it could certainly do even if the author never
                >heard of CF. Victorian fantasy has been rather "in the air"
                >lately.

                There are Victorian fantasies, and there are Victorian fantasies, just like
                there are Elves and there are Elves, and there is Robin Hood and there is
                Robin Hood.

                *sniff sniff* I've smelled the air, and the air could use some Lysol.

                David Bratman
              • Stolzi@aol.com
                Well, I had a look at GOB S GRIEF at the bookstore today. It s filed there with Fiction, not with SF/Fantasy. Didn t look quite my cup of tea, but then my
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 20 6:35 PM
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                  Well, I had a look at GOB'S GRIEF at the bookstore today. It's filed there
                  with Fiction, not with SF/Fantasy. Didn't look quite my cup of tea, but
                  then my friend's tastes and mine are different.

                  In a message dated 4/20/01 2:40:16 PM Central Daylight Time,
                  dbratman@... writes:

                  >
                  > *sniff sniff* I've smelled the air, and the air could use some Lysol.

                  To say nothing of the dog :P

                  Mary S
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