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Re: Digest Number 542

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  • wyspergrove@netscape.net
    ... My mother read _The Lord of the Rings_ to me as an infant. I read it myself at the age of 9, but no matter how many times I read it (I stopped counting
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 26 1:31 PM
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      >> I first read LotR at age 26 or 27.  I found it captivating but not necessarily moving in the way the the Narnia series moved me in my teens.  Even as late as my senior year of high school I used to secretly half hope that I would find a magic door to Narnia.  It wasn't until about a year after I first read LotR that I found myself irresistibly drawn back to it again, found in my heart an inexplicable longing to return to Middle-earth.  With each re-reading, the longings get stronger, the meaning gets deeper, and I find myself becoming more and more "moveable."  I tell ya, last time I read the Silmarillion - or is it the Lost Tales? - where Turin Turambar finds that Niniel is Nienor, and that she has committed suicide, I almost couldn't get through it.  I'm tearing up again thinking about it!  My appetite for the Mythopoeic experience gets stronger with every re-read.  Which is partly why I'm developing music that will (I hope) partly satisfy it.<<

      My mother read _The Lord of the Rings_ to me as an infant. I read it myself at the age of 9, but no matter how many times I read it (I stopped counting after 15), it still moves me. In fact, a couple of my friends and I are writing a Tolkien fanfic--quite interesting experience.
      However, I just read the Narnia Chronicles as a College Freshmore. Wow. I picked up _The Magician's Nephew_ and found myself transported; no other author (besides Tolkien) moved me as such. I couldn't stop reading until the last page of _The Last Battle_ was turned.
      I also found the same "mythopoeic" feeling while reading Madeline L'Engle's _Wrinkle in Time_ series, Patricia C. Wrede's _The Enchanted Forest Chronicles_, and many more than I can name in this short letter. I tried to describe the "mythopoeic" feeling to someone once, and I came terribly short. After reading these books I couldn't stop thinking about them; the "mythopoeic" feeling kinda lingered and made me aware that there is more to the world than the eye can see and the hand can touch. Perhaps you guys could give a better discription.

      ---Kat---
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