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Re: [mythsoc] Digest Number 541

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  • mickie grover
    ... I first read LOTR as an adult -- I was 29. I did, it is true, have the flu. I was broke, in an apartment with little heat -- in Mpls in October, and
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 24, 2001
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2001 15:24:12 EST
      > From: ERATRIANO@...
      > Subject: Re: The Silver Trumpet
      >
      > In a message dated 03/15/2001 1:25:56 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      > daeron@... writes:
      >
      > I am more
      > wondering how much people were moved by LOTR if they first read it as
      > adults.. and whether we have periods when we are more "moveable."


      I first read LOTR as an 'adult' -- I was 29. I did, it is true, have the
      flu. I was broke, in an apartment with little heat -- in Mpls in October,
      and every day I had to drag myself out of bed & down to the street to the pay
      phone to check to see if I'd gotten a job I'd applied for -- & needed
      desperately. So maybe I was 'moveable' due to my circumstances -- but I
      think we are all always moveable -- sometimes we forget, or get crusted
      over -- but the ability to be delighted, or moved, remains -- part of being
      human.

      Mickie
      mickie@...
      There are only two kinds of people in this world --those who are alive and
      those who are afraid. -- Rachel Naomi Remen
    • David J. Finnamore
      ... I first read LotR at age 26 or 27. I found it captivating but not necessarily moving in the way the the Narnia series moved me in my teens. Even as late
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 24, 2001
        Lizzie wrote:

        > probably done to death... but that's not my point anyway. I am more
        > wondering how much people were moved by LOTR if they first read it as
        > adults.. and whether we have periods when we are more "moveable." I know I
        > was storm-tossed by Williams' writing and Especially the Arthuriad, oh my!
        > But was that because I was 20?

        I first read LotR at age 26 or 27. I found it captivating but not necessarily
        moving in the way the the Narnia series moved me in my teens. Even as late as my
        senior year of high school I used to secretly half hope that I would find a magic
        door to Narnia. It wasn't until about a year after I first read LotR that I
        found myself irresistibly drawn back to it again, found in my heart an
        inexplicable longing to return to Middle-earth. With each re-reading, the
        longings get stronger, the meaning gets deeper, and I find myself becoming more
        and more "moveable." I tell ya, last time I read the Silmarillion - or is it the
        Lost Tales? - where Turin Turambar finds that Niniel is Nienor, and that she has
        committed suicide, I almost couldn't get through it. I'm tearing up again
        thinking about it! My appetite for the Mythopoeic experience gets stronger with
        every re-read. Which is partly why I'm developing music that will (I hope)
        partly satisfy it.


        > that. I live in dread that history will record I was no writer but only a
        > scribbling youth....
        >
        > What could I read today for the first time that people might consider
        > equally, well, moving?

        What could you write today that people would find equally moving? :-) (That's
        intended as encouragement, not a slam.)

        --
        David J. Finnamore
        Nashville, TN, USA
        http://personal.bna.bellsouth.net/bna/d/f/dfin/index.html
        --
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