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Spenser

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  • wyspergrove@netscape.net
    I am doing a paper on Spenser s influence on modern fantasy (more specifically-Spenser s influence on C.S. Lewis). Can any of you lovely people give me a few
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 6, 2001
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      I am doing a paper on Spenser's influence on modern fantasy (more specifically-Spenser's influence on C.S. Lewis). Can any of you lovely people give me a few resources I may consult?

      -Kat
      __________________________________________________________________
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    • jen stevens
      Kat, There s a large number of articles (and at least one book) about Spenser s (apparent) influence on Lewis. There s also some things about Lewis Spenser
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 6, 2001
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        Kat,

        There's a large number of articles (and at least one book) about Spenser's
        (apparent) influence on Lewis. There's also some things about Lewis'
        Spenser criticism. I haven't got a full list with me atm, but will try to
        send some items to you in the next day or so.

        Good luck on your paper!

        - Jen Stevens

        At 03:10 PM 2/6/2001 -0500, you wrote:
        >I am doing a paper on Spenser's influence on modern fantasy (more
        specifically-Spenser's influence on C.S. Lewis). Can any of you lovely
        people give me a few resources I may consult?
        >
        >-Kat
        >__________________________________________________________________
        >Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Webmail account today at
        http://webmail.netscape.com/
        >
        >
        >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >
        >
      • Gwenyth Hood
        As far as Lewis s fiction is concerned, the most striking references I can think of are in _The Dark Tower_ or at least the criticisms of it. But that, of
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 6, 2001
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          As far as Lewis's fiction is concerned, the most striking references I can think of are in _The Dark Tower_ or at least the criticisms of it. But that, of course, is a fragment, and a
          controversial one.

          Perhaps there is more in the Narnia stories or the Deep Space Trilogy. I haven't thought about it much.

          --Gwenyth Hood


          wyspergrove@... wrote:

          > I am doing a paper on Spenser's influence on modern fantasy (more specifically-Spenser's influence on C.S. Lewis). Can any of you lovely people give me a few resources I may consult?
          >
          > -Kat
          > __________________________________________________________________
          > Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Webmail account today at http://webmail.netscape.com/
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        • Joe Christopher
          ... According to Lowenberg s secondary bibliography, it is Joe R. Christopher Touring The Dark Tower _CSL: The Bulletin of the New York C. S. Lewis
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 8, 2001
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            _______
            >
            >Message: 8
            > Date: Wed, 07 Feb 2001 12:56:12 -0500
            > From: Gwenyth Hood <hood@...>
            >Subject: Re: Re: Spenser and Lewis
            >
            >Thanks, Joe. Do you have a full reference to your "Touring the Dark Tower"
            >article?
            >--Gwenyth Hood

            According to Lowenberg's secondary bibliography, it is

            Joe R. Christopher
            "Touring 'The Dark Tower'"
            _CSL: The Bulletin of the New York C. S. Lewis Society_ 9 (April 1978): 9-13.

            (Her annotation doesn't mention Spenser, I see. Oh well... But I _did_
            note a Spenserian reference or so.) Lowenberg does list 11 works on Lewis
            which she does annotate as mentioning Spenser, so there are further items
            for Kat--although I suppose she has already noted those.

            --Joe
          • wyspergrove@netscape.net
            ... Joe R. Christopher Touring The Dark Tower _CSL: The Bulletin of the New York C. S. Lewis Society_ 9 (April 1978): 9-13. (Her annotation doesn t mention
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 10, 2001
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              >> According to Lowenberg's secondary bibliography, it is
              Joe R. Christopher
              "Touring 'The Dark Tower'"
              _CSL: The Bulletin of the New York C. S. Lewis Society_ 9 (April 1978): 9-13.
              (Her annotation doesn't mention Spenser, I see.  Oh well...  But I _did_
              note a Spenserian reference or so.)  Lowenberg does list 11 works on Lewis
              which she does annotate as mentioning Spenser, so there are further items
              for Kat--although I suppose she has already noted those.
              --Joe>>

              Yes, thank you.

              The more I research and read Spenser and Lewis, the more in awe I become. I feel so behind! My mother banned Lewis from our household; therefore, I did not get to read any of his works until last October(first College semester). I started with _Mere Christianity_, and I have read over 20 works since. I am currently reading _Spenser's Images of Life_- Lewis' lectures on "The Faerie Queen."
              This semester my Renaissance literature cource introduced me to Spenser. In an age where Erasmus sited 144 different ways of saying, "Thank you for your letter." (_De copia_), Spenser epitomizes copiousness. _The Faerie Queen_ contains approximately 3,864 stanzas; 34,776 lines; and 142,968 feet(that is 27.077 miles of poetry) all in strict meter and rhyme-Wow. It makes me want to write a similar epic in modern English.

              Thank you all for your resources and help.

              --Kat--
              __________________________________________________________________
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            • Diane Joy Baker
              ... From: To: Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2001 5:16 AM Subject: [mythsoc] Re: Spenser My mother banned
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 10, 2001
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                ----- Original Message -----
                From: <wyspergrove@...>
                To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2001 5:16 AM
                Subject: [mythsoc] Re: Spenser


                My mother banned Lewis from our household; therefore, I did not get to read
                any of his works until last October(first College semester). I started with
                _Mere Christianity_, and I have read over 20 works since. I am currently
                reading _Spenser's Images of Life_- Lewis' lectures on "The Faerie Queen."

                Your mother banned CSL from the house? For Heaven's sake, why?

                > This semester my Renaissance literature cource introduced me to Spenser.
                In an age where Erasmus sited 144 different ways of saying, "Thank you for
                your letter." (_De copia_), Spenser epitomizes copiousness. _The Faerie
                Queen_ contains approximately 3,864 stanzas; 34,776 lines; and 142,968
                feet(that is 27.077 miles of poetry) all in strict meter and rhyme-Wow. It
                makes me want to write a similar epic in modern English.

                Spenser is hard to top, and I know you're not thinking of that, but good
                luck to you. (Let us read it when it's done.) ---djb.


                >
                > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                >
                >
              • jen stevens
                ... specifically-Spenser s influence on C.S. Lewis). Can any of you lovely people give me a few resources I may consult? ... Kat, I m sorry that this is so
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 13, 2001
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                  At 03:10 PM 2/6/2001 -0500, wyspergrove@... wrote:
                  >I am doing a paper on Spenser's influence on modern fantasy (more
                  specifically-Spenser's influence on C.S. Lewis). Can any of you lovely
                  people give me a few resources I may consult?
                  >
                  >-Kat

                  Kat,

                  I'm sorry that this is so late, and I hope that this list will still be
                  useful to you (it may be more than you want :). I meant to do it much
                  earlier, but I was sick much of last week, and it (and many other things)
                  got neglected. I'm posting these to the list in case anyone else might be
                  interested...

                  I found these articles and books while doing the literature search for my
                  own spenser/lewis research (which has since mutated into some rather
                  different angles...I greatly hope that it will now resolve itself!). Many
                  of these didn't show up in my initial Modern Language Association online
                  bibliography, which was very frustrating (I found them by literally going
                  through the stacks). I am sure that this is only a very partial list of
                  works on Lewis/Spenser. The degree to which Lewis' use of/relation to is
                  addressed varies greatly.

                  Also, in addition to "Spenser's Images of Life," you may want to look at
                  Lewis' "English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, Excluding Drama."
                  There is also an essay called "Spenser's Cruel Cupid" by Lewis about a
                  scene in FQ; it gets referred to a lot in the Lewis literature (I think
                  that it has been published in various essay collections; unfortunately, the
                  essay collection I have is currently sitting in my office at the library...).

                  Lewis and Spenserian Influence/Criticism

                  Cox, John D. "Epistemological Release in The Silver Chair." A Longing for a
                  Form. ed. Peter J. Schakel. Kent State University Press, 1977. 159-168.
                  (incidentally, this essay is amazing!)

                  The C.S. Lewis Readers' Encyclopedia. ed. Jeffrey D. Schultz and John G.
                  West Jr. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, 1998.
                  (Doesn't really discuss Lewis/Spenser very much, but does include a brief
                  bibliography)

                  Downing, David C. Planets in Peril. A Critical Study of C.S. Lewis's Ransom
                  Trilogy. Amherst, Massachusetts: The University of Massachusetts Press, 1992.
                  (includes a few general bits about Lewis/Spenser in relation to the Ransom
                  Trilogy)

                  Eastman, Jackie F. "C.S. Lewis's Indebtedness to Edmund Spenser: The
                  Labyrinth Episode as Threshold Symbol in The Lion, the Witch, and the
                  Wardrobe." Proceedings of the thirteenth annual conference of the
                  Children's Literature Association. ed. Susan R. Gannon, Ruth Anne Thompson.
                  University of Missouri, Kansas City, May 16-18, 1986.

                  Haigh, John D. "C.S. Lewis and the Tradition of Visionary Romance." Word
                  and Story in C.S. Lewis. ed. Peter J. Schakel and Charles A. Huttar.
                  Columbia, MI. University of Missouri Press, 1991. 182-198.

                  Hannay, Margaret Patterson. C.S. Lewis. New York: Frederick Ungar
                  Publishing Co., 1981.
                  (Discusses Lewis' literary criticism, including his work with Spenser).

                  Hannay, Margaret P. "A Preface to Perelandra." The Longing for a Form. ed.
                  Peter J. Schakel. Kent State University Press, 1977.

                  Hannay, Margaret P. "Provocative Generalizations: The Allegory of Love in
                  Retrospect." The Taste of the Pineapple. Essays on C.S. Lewis as Reader,
                  Critic, and Imaginative Writer. ed. Bruce l. Edwards. Bowling Green, Ohio:
                  Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1988. 58-78.

                  Myers, Doris T. C.S. Lewis in Context. Kent, Ohio: The Kent State
                  University Press, 1994.
                  (Myers argues that Lewis used a Spensarian form and structure throughout
                  the Narnia books. She also has sections on his other fiction, but I haven't
                  read them as closely.)

                  They Stand Together. The Letters of C.S. Lewis to Arthur Greeves
                  (1914-1963). ed. Walter Hooper. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1979.
                  (nothing on Lewis' reading of Spenser persay, but includes some charming
                  bits about his first reading of Spenser, including his deliberations as to
                  which edition of Spenser to purchase)

                  - Jen
                • wyspergrove@netscape.net
                  Thank you Jen Stevens, those sources did help me. (My paper is not due until May.) --Kat-- __________________________________________________________________
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 16, 2001
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                    Thank you Jen Stevens, those sources did help me. (My paper is not due until May.)

                    --Kat--

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