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Re: [mythsoc] New member

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  • Diane Joy Baker
    Happy New Year to you, too, and welcome to the list. I d recommend *The Place of the Lion* for Williams. It s his most accessible work. I also invite you to
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2001
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      Happy New Year to you, too, and welcome to the list. I'd recommend *The
      Place of the Lion* for Williams. It's his most accessible work.

      I also invite you to consider being a corresponding member for Butterbur's
      Woodshed, a bi-monthly APA. We consider a different fantasy-oriented book
      or topic every other month. You need only write two pages every other issue
      to be considered active! If this sounds interesting contact me off-list and
      I'll send details.

      Welcome---and I look forward to hear more from you. I love Chesterton, but
      I've not read nearly enough Belloc. Suggestions? TTYL. ---djb.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Clark <pxclark@...>
      To: <mythsoc@egroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2000 1:51 PM
      Subject: [mythsoc] New member


      >
      >
      > Greetings and Happy New Year to all!
      >
      > I've just joined the list. It's been some years since I read the
      > Tolkien trilogy (and even more since I read the Chronicles) but I
      > hope to revisit "Lord of the Rings" sometime this year. Screwtape
      > I've re-read several times over the years.
      >
      > Charles Williams I know of, but haven't read. Any recommendations in
      > particular?
      >
      > I have a longtime interest in Christian literature and moderate a
      > list called ChesterBelloc, devoted to modern Catholic authors. (It's
      > recently included postings on "Tolkien's Christmas Star" and this
      > business of Oz vs. Narnia). The URL, in case anyone might be
      > interested, is:
      >
      > http://www.egroups.com/group/ChesterBelloc
      >
      > I look forward to the discussions on mythsoc. Looks like a lively
      > list.
      >
      > Regards,
      > Paul Clark
      >
      >
      >
      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      >
      >
    • David S. Bratman
      ... Welcome! Other recommendations noted, but among Williams s novels, I think it s generally regarded that the best one to start with is _War in Heaven_.
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 1, 2001
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        Paul Clark wrote:

        > Charles Williams I know of, but haven't read. Any recommendations in
        > particular?

        Welcome! Other recommendations noted, but among Williams's novels, I
        think it's generally regarded that the best one to start with is _War in
        Heaven_. _Many Dimensions_ is a close second. _Descent Into Hell_ and
        _All Hallows Eve_ are often thought the best, but one needs to be already
        attuned to Williams's thought to make much out of them.

        Of course, one can get a little of that by reading the "Charles Williams
        novels" by the other Inklings, Lewis's _That Hideous Strength_ and
        Tolkien's _The Notion Club Papers_ (in _Sauron Defeated_).

        David Bratman
      • Stolzi@aol.com
        In a message dated 01/01/2001 8:10:26 AM Central Standard Time, ... Hummm? I d say WAR IN HEAVEN, myself. Mary S
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 2, 2001
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          In a message dated 01/01/2001 8:10:26 AM Central Standard Time,
          dianejoy@... writes:

          > I'd recommend *The
          > Place of the Lion* for Williams. It's his most accessible work.

          Hummm? I'd say WAR IN HEAVEN, myself.

          Mary S
        • Elizabeth Hardy
          Hello everyone, I just wanted to introduce myself, as I have finally gotten round to joining up. I m Elizabeth Baird Hardy. I teach English at a western North
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 1, 2006
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            Hello everyone,
            I just wanted to introduce myself, as I have finally gotten round to joining up. I'm Elizabeth Baird Hardy. I teach English at a western North Carolina Community College, and my scholarly (and non-scholarly) interests lie primarily with Lewis, Rowling, Spenser, and Milton. I am also an Appalachian storyteller and historic interpreter. I may have met some folks at conferences such as the 2003 one in Nashville and at the Witching Hour in 2005 (I presented at each). I am looking forward to chatting with everyone any time when I am not floundering under a pile of ungraded research papers, building train tracks with my son, or reading proofs for my husband, who is a writer and historian.
            Elizabeth



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          • Berni Phillips
            Welcome, Elizabeth! The storytelling is interesting, but I ve never heard anyone call themselves a historic interpreter before. What is that like? Is it a
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 1, 2006
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              Welcome, Elizabeth! The storytelling is interesting, but I've never heard anyone call themselves a historic interpreter before. What is that like? Is it a more folksy thing or scholarly?

              Berni

              >From: Elizabeth Hardy <britomart3@...>

              > I just wanted to introduce myself, as I have finally gotten round to joining up. I'm Elizabeth Baird Hardy. I teach English at a western North Carolina Community College, and my scholarly (and non-scholarly) interests lie primarily with Lewis, Rowling, Spenser, and Milton. I am also an Appalachian storyteller and historic interpreter.
            • Elizabeth Hardy
              Thanks for the welcome! The storytelling and historic interpreting go together sometimes. My place and period is 1850s-1870s Appalachia. I dress as a woman
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 1, 2006
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                Thanks for the welcome! The storytelling and historic interpreting go together sometimes. My place and period is 1850s-1870s Appalachia. I dress as a woman from that time period (along with my family), and we volunteer at museums, schools, and other programs to help people better understand history. It's a wonderful way to better appreciate the past and to teach others about it.

                Berni Phillips <bernip@...> wrote: Welcome, Elizabeth! The storytelling is interesting, but I've never heard anyone call themselves a historic interpreter before. What is that like? Is it a more folksy thing or scholarly?

                Berni

                >From: Elizabeth Hardy <britomart3@...>

                > I just wanted to introduce myself, as I have finally gotten round to joining up. I'm Elizabeth Baird Hardy. I teach English at a western North Carolina Community College, and my scholarly (and non-scholarly) interests lie primarily with Lewis, Rowling, Spenser, and Milton. I am also an Appalachian storyteller and historic interpreter.


                The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org



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