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Re: [mythsoc] In the Land of Faerie

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  • Trudy Shaw
    ... From: Paul F. Labaki To: Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 10:54 PM Subject: Re: [mythsoc] In the Land of Faerie
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Paul F. Labaki <sheik@...>
      To: <mythsoc@egroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 10:54 PM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] In the Land of Faerie


      > A good dose of Homer never hurts. The Odyssey is probably the seminal
      > example of hero journey, at least in the Western canon. Any of the great
      > epics or narative poems of western lit could be used if you like,
      including
      > Dante's "Divine Comedy", Milton's "Paradise Lost", Spenser's "Fairie
      Queen",
      > Malory's "Le Morte d'Arthur" etc. Tolkien took inspiration from
      > Scandanavian works, among others. These great old works have no less to
      > offer now than in the past. The fact that they've been worked over the
      > centuries only reinforces their worth. If not rich, they would not have
      had
      > new vitality for each generation. If you haven't worked with these, don't
      > lose the opportunity.
      > Myself, I've had only the tiniest bite of Dante, and I look forward to
      > jumping in, but I haven't scheduled it yet. Shedder's, what do you think
      > about addressing one of these sometime in the future?
      >
      > Peace,
      > Paul Labaki
      >
      >


      When I first subscribed to Mythlore, I'd never read anything by Charles
      Williams (heck, like most people I'd never *heard* of Charles Williams) and
      really had no desire to. Then I read an article in Mythlore (title and
      author forgotten, I'm afraid) linking the imagery of All Hallows' Eve to
      that of Dante's Purgatorio. I was intrigued and began searching for
      Williams' novels (this was pre-internet days). I finally located a few in a
      used bookstore, bought them all, and began reading--with All Hallows' Eve,
      of course. My reaction was, "I didn't know anyone wrote like this!" So,
      many thanks to whoever wrote that article--for being familiar with both
      Williams *and* Dante, and for sharing your insights.

      (I've also belonged to a group that discussed the Divine Comedy and highly
      recommend the practice.)

      -- Trudy
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/3/00 11:59:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, Stolzi@aol.com writes:
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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        In a message dated 11/3/00 11:59:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, Stolzi@...
        writes:

        << But will today's children receive them? >>

        This is precisely why, among the many books and such that I have given my
        nephew and nieces for Christmas presents, nothing from Disney has ever
        included. I don't know whether the complaints in that website you give are
        true though. I don't see Disney stuff crowding out better books in my
        nephews and nieces's bookshelves. And in my experience it is possible to
        ignore such things. I remember seeing many Disney comics, cartoons, and
        movies as a child, but I soon learned to ignore them and look for better
        stories.

        Wendell Wagner
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