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Re: Star Wars as Mythopoeic art

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  • FrMacKen@xxx.xxx
    Diane, I understand your feelings about Star Trek, although the Next Generation was an excellent series. And yes, they did discuss monetary matters aside from
    Message 1 of 29 , Jun 24, 1999
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      Diane,
      I understand your feelings about Star Trek, although the Next
      Generation was an excellent series. And yes, they did discuss monetary
      matters aside from the Ferengi society. I happen to think that Star Trek: The
      Next Generation was one of the best television shows in it's day. (Can it be
      five years since that show went off the air?)
      I do not believe that even my beloved Star Trek came remotely close
      to Tolkien's world. My feeling that Star Trek was akin to a morality play set
      in the future. The best episodes were character driven and often exposed
      certain faults (i.e. the episode after Picard was returned to the Enterprise
      after being held by the Borg. That episode exposed Picard's fear at his
      inability to control his situation..one of my favourite episodes).
      It was not as grand as the Star Wars myth, but remember: without Star
      Trek, there would be no Star Wars.
      Yours truly,
      Ron
    • FrMacKen@xxx.xxx
      Diane, I fear that I didn t state myself clearly. This society is much too preoccupied with financial concerns to care about the fanciful. It is deemed a waste
      Message 2 of 29 , Jun 24, 1999
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        Diane,
        I fear that I didn't state myself clearly. This society is much too
        preoccupied with financial concerns to care about the fanciful. It is deemed
        a waste of time. All but select few (such as us) explore our imagination and
        let it take us whither it will. We as a country only have time for myth if it
        is on television or the movies. I really believe that the act of storytelling
        (from whence myths began) is a lost art. I think that is one of our ills
        today. We don't take time to read or read to our children. Instead we set our
        children in front of a television set or a video game and leave them alone.
        Does that stimulate their minds? I think not. And as good as Star Wars is, it
        is not as good as reading a book; letting the author take our imaginations on
        a wonderful trip, forcing our minds to create images out of mere words.
        Ah, but there is another can of worms.
        Ron
      • Diane Baker
        ... OK, I can accept that. I ve never quite had the stomach to return to Brooks. I just had this vision of Alanon the wizard getting up before a small group
        Message 3 of 29 , Jun 24, 1999
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          Ted Sherman wrote:
          >
          > From: Ted Sherman <beohilde@...>
          >
          > Diane Baker wrote:
          >
          > > I'm afraid I don't remember who Shea Ohmsford is. I take it he's a
          > > young quester, but in which book does he appear? Wait a minute. Isn't
          > > that the hero of *Sword of Shanara?* I seem to remember that name
          > > before I threw the book across the room. When I cane across the name
          > > of Alanon the wizard, I said "That's it." THUNK! Do you use *this* in
          > > your fantasy lit course? Say it ain't so! (Or is my memory playing
          > > tricks again? A situation very likely.) ---djb.
          >
          > Yes, Shea Ohmsford is the protagonist in The Sword of Shannara, which I do teach in my fantasy lit courses. I use it because of the wonderful twist at the end of the
          > story (involving the true power of the sword), and also because it's a wonderful book to use in discussing intertextuality. Brooks' world is our world after a nuclear catastrophe, and there's all sorts of political intrigue that one can easily see is borne out of the period in which Brooks was writing the novel (early-mid 70s).The intertextuality part involves comparing the figures in TSOS with those in TLOR. There's almost, but not quite, a one-to-one correspondence between the nine walkers in TLOR and the band that eventually go in search of the Sword in TSOS. I've not read any of Brooks' other works though.

          OK, I can accept that. I've never quite had the stomach to return to
          Brooks. I just had this vision of Alanon the wizard getting up before a
          small group and saying, "Hello. My name is Alanon and I'm a wizard
          alcoholic." Figured a writer that careless with names can't be too
          great, and every time I came across that name, I'd snicker instead of
          getting into the meat of the story. And with fantasy, that wizard
          usually sticks around until at least a third of the way through the
          book. I've had other people tell me that they like the function of the
          sword, and that Brooks does have some interesting points. Maybe I'll
          have to give him a second chance.

          > One final note: another great (or at least very good and believeable) mythopoeic > writer is Stephen Lawhead, whose Song of Albion trilogy is, I think, a great story
          > and a wonderful conglomeration of Celtic materials. His Athurian sequence ain't > bad either, though I almost prefer Jack Whyte's no-nonsense (meaning no magic and
          > mysticism) Chronicles of Camulod series.

          Ohhh, yeah! I like Lawhead fine. He does very careful work, and knows
          his Celtic mythology. Have you seen his *Byzantium?* And yes, I have
          *all* of Jack Whyte's *Chronicles of Camulod* series. Excellent. I've
          enjoyed it greatly. ---djb
        • Diane Baker
          ... I agree; I love Trek; please don t get me wrong. ... Absolutely right. It s more like a morality play than epic or myth. The best episodes were character
          Message 4 of 29 , Jun 24, 1999
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            FrMacKen@... wrote:
            >
            > From: FrMacKen@...
            >

            > I happen to think that Star Trek: The
            > Next Generation was one of the best television shows in it's day. (Can it be five years since that show went off the air?)

            I agree; I love Trek; please don't get me wrong.
            >I do not believe that even my beloved Star Trek came remotely close
            > to Tolkien's world. My feeling that Star Trek was akin to a morality play set in the future.

            Absolutely right. It's more like a morality play than epic or myth.

            The best episodes were character driven and often exposed certain faults
            (i.e. the episode after Picard was returned to the Enterprise after
            being held by the Borg. That episode exposed Picard's fear at his
            inability to control his situation..one of my favourite episodes).

            Another agreement; no quarrel here. That was a very good ep. Another
            fave was the one where he was held prisoner by the Cardies. I also
            liked a good number of Deep Space Nine eps.

            > It was not as grand as the Star Wars myth, but remember: > without Star Trek, there would be no Star Wars.

            And without Trek, there'd probably be no 2001 or other great SF films.
            My only point is that there were some economic holes in some of the
            tales. ---djb.
          • Paul F. Labaki
            The Inklings (I think correctly) would likely have taken the position that we have our own mythology; for Christians, the names and stories can be found in a
            Message 5 of 29 , Jun 27, 1999
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              The Inklings (I think correctly) would likely have taken the position that
              we have our own mythology; for Christians, the names and stories can be
              found in a book we call "The Bible." The fact that there are people who
              believe the mythology to be true and act accordingly does not invalidate its
              mythic nature.
              --
              Paul Labaki

              ----------

              >
              >> Star Wars is our futile attempt at forging our own myth.
              >
              > Thank God we are still making the attempt! Woe be unto us the day we
              > stop!
              >
              >
              > Respectfully,
              > Jim Bohannon
              > Milledgeville, Georgia
              > USA
              >
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            • Diane Baker
              ... I would certainly agree. Mythology does seem a bit tinged with the notion a story, which for the most part, should be disbelieved, but has to be
              Message 6 of 29 , Jun 28, 1999
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                Paul F. Labaki wrote:
                >
                > From: "Paul F. Labaki" <sheik@...>
                >
                > The Inklings (I think correctly) would likely have taken the position that
                > we have our own mythology; for Christians, the names and stories can be
                > found in a book we call "The Bible." The fact that there are people who
                > believe the mythology to be true and act accordingly does not invalidate its
                > mythic nature.
                > --
                > Paul Labaki

                I would certainly agree. "Mythology" does seem a bit tinged with the
                notion "a story, which for the most part, should be disbelieved, but has
                to be respected for PC's sake." I prefer the term "mythos." JRRT and
                CSL do subscribe to this "mythos," of course! ---djb.
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