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In the Land of Faerie

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  • Ramrick51@aol.com
    Hi, I have yet to respond to this egroup. However, I have been reading these digests for a few months. It s refreshing to see people with a bit of sense. As
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 24, 2000
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      Hi,
      I have yet to respond to this egroup. However, I have been reading these
      digests for a few months. It's refreshing to see people with a bit of sense.
      As a senior English major in a government school, I have been forced to read
      nonsensical books day after day (with the exception of great medieval lit)
      with Freudian commentary. I hope to do an independent study in fantasy
      literature next semester. I entered Middle Earth last May(finally reading
      LOTR) and have become enthralled by elves, dwarves,Valar, and much more. I
      have read all of Tolkien and I would appreciate if yall would could give me
      suggestions of works I must read in my independent study. I am hoping for
      8-10 books by others besides Tolkien.
      Rick
    • Margaret Dean
      ... You ll probably get all sorts of suggestions, but let me put in a plug for Ursula K. LeGuin s Earthsea trilogy (A WIZARD OF EARTHSEA, THE TOMBS OF ATUAN,
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 24, 2000
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        Ramrick51@... wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        > I have yet to respond to this egroup. However, I have been reading these
        > digests for a few months. It's refreshing to see people with a bit of sense.
        > As a senior English major in a government school, I have been forced to read
        > nonsensical books day after day (with the exception of great medieval lit)
        > with Freudian commentary. I hope to do an independent study in fantasy
        > literature next semester. I entered Middle Earth last May(finally reading
        > LOTR) and have become enthralled by elves, dwarves,Valar, and much more. I
        > have read all of Tolkien and I would appreciate if yall would could give me
        > suggestions of works I must read in my independent study. I am hoping for
        > 8-10 books by others besides Tolkien.

        You'll probably get all sorts of suggestions, but let me put in a
        plug for Ursula K. LeGuin's Earthsea trilogy (A WIZARD OF
        EARTHSEA, THE TOMBS OF ATUAN, and THE FARTHEST SHORE; up to you
        whether you want to include TEHANU or not, which has gotten mixed
        reviews). Excellent books with a very different flavor and
        worldview from Tolkien, thus making for good
        comparisons/contrasts.


        --Margaret Dean
        <margdean@...>
      • Paul F. Labaki
        A good dose of Homer never hurts. The Odyssey is probably the seminal example of hero journey, at least in the Western canon. Any of the great epics or
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 2, 2000
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          A good dose of Homer never hurts. The Odyssey is probably the seminal
          example of hero journey, at least in the Western canon. Any of the great
          epics or narative poems of western lit could be used if you like, including
          Dante's "Divine Comedy", Milton's "Paradise Lost", Spenser's "Fairie Queen",
          Malory's "Le Morte d'Arthur" etc. Tolkien took inspiration from
          Scandanavian works, among others. These great old works have no less to
          offer now than in the past. The fact that they've been worked over the
          centuries only reinforces their worth. If not rich, they would not have had
          new vitality for each generation. If you haven't worked with these, don't
          lose the opportunity.
          Myself, I've had only the tiniest bite of Dante, and I look forward to
          jumping in, but I haven't scheduled it yet. Shedder's, what do you think
          about addressing one of these sometime in the future?

          Peace,
          Paul Labaki

          > From: Margaret Dean <margdean@...>
          > Reply-To: mythsoc@egroups.com
          > Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2000 20:41:00 -0400
          > To: mythsoc@egroups.com
          > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] In the Land of Faerie
          >
          > Ramrick51@... wrote:
          >>
          >> Hi,
          >> I have yet to respond to this egroup. However, I have been reading these
          >> digests for a few months. It's refreshing to see people with a bit of sense.
          >> As a senior English major in a government school, I have been forced to read
          >> nonsensical books day after day (with the exception of great medieval lit)
          >> with Freudian commentary. I hope to do an independent study in fantasy
          >> literature next semester. I entered Middle Earth last May(finally reading
          >> LOTR) and have become enthralled by elves, dwarves,Valar, and much more. I
          >> have read all of Tolkien and I would appreciate if yall would could give me
          >> suggestions of works I must read in my independent study. I am hoping for
          >> 8-10 books by others besides Tolkien.
          >
          > You'll probably get all sorts of suggestions, but let me put in a
          > plug for Ursula K. LeGuin's Earthsea trilogy (A WIZARD OF
          > EARTHSEA, THE TOMBS OF ATUAN, and THE FARTHEST SHORE; up to you
          > whether you want to include TEHANU or not, which has gotten mixed
          > reviews). Excellent books with a very different flavor and
          > worldview from Tolkien, thus making for good
          > comparisons/contrasts.
          >
          >
          > --Margaret Dean
          > <margdean@...>
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          >
        • Stolzi@aol.com
          In a message dated 11/2/00 10:57:32 PM Central Standard Time, ... But will today s children receive them? See this interesting (and alarming) URL:
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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            In a message dated 11/2/00 10:57:32 PM Central Standard Time,
            sheik@... writes:

            > These great old works have no less to
            > offer now than in the past.

            But will today's children receive them? See this interesting (and alarming)
            URL:

            <A HREF="http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0010/opinion/gold.html">FT
            October 2000: Grim Tales</A>

            Mary S
          • Ted Sherman
            Great essay, Mary; thanks. Ted ... -- Dr. Theodore James Sherman, Editor Mythlore: A Journal of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams and Mythopoeic
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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              Great essay, Mary; thanks.

              Ted

              Stolzi@... wrote:

              > In a message dated 11/2/00 10:57:32 PM Central Standard Time,
              > sheik@... writes:
              >
              > > These great old works have no less to
              > > offer now than in the past.
              >
              > But will today's children receive them? See this interesting (and alarming)
              > URL:
              >
              > <A HREF="http://www.firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0010/opinion/gold.html">FT
              > October 2000: Grim Tales</A>
              >
              > Mary S
              >
              >
              > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

              --
              Dr. Theodore James Sherman, Editor
              Mythlore: A Journal of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams and
              Mythopoeic Literature
              Box X041, Department of English
              Middle Tennessee State University
              Murfreesboro, TN 37132
              615 898-5836; FAX 615 898-5098
              tsherman@...
              tedsherman@...
            • ERATRIANO@aol.com
              Thanks. Yes, I can t wait till my children can sit still long enough to read the REAL stories, especially the many Mowgli books, but also Tarka the Otter,
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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                Thanks. Yes, I can't wait till my children can sit still long enough to read
                the REAL stories, especially the many Mowgli books, but also Tarka the Otter,
                Terhune's collie books, etc. But will they? And, I mean, not that long ago
                all this fluff (Disney et al.) didn't exist. Is it any wonder that we drool
                so over some of the older writers and their powers of language?

                Lizzie
              • Trudy Shaw
                ... From: Paul F. Labaki To: Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 10:54 PM Subject: Re: [mythsoc] In the Land of Faerie
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Paul F. Labaki <sheik@...>
                  To: <mythsoc@egroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 10:54 PM
                  Subject: Re: [mythsoc] In the Land of Faerie


                  > A good dose of Homer never hurts. The Odyssey is probably the seminal
                  > example of hero journey, at least in the Western canon. Any of the great
                  > epics or narative poems of western lit could be used if you like,
                  including
                  > Dante's "Divine Comedy", Milton's "Paradise Lost", Spenser's "Fairie
                  Queen",
                  > Malory's "Le Morte d'Arthur" etc. Tolkien took inspiration from
                  > Scandanavian works, among others. These great old works have no less to
                  > offer now than in the past. The fact that they've been worked over the
                  > centuries only reinforces their worth. If not rich, they would not have
                  had
                  > new vitality for each generation. If you haven't worked with these, don't
                  > lose the opportunity.
                  > Myself, I've had only the tiniest bite of Dante, and I look forward to
                  > jumping in, but I haven't scheduled it yet. Shedder's, what do you think
                  > about addressing one of these sometime in the future?
                  >
                  > Peace,
                  > Paul Labaki
                  >
                  >


                  When I first subscribed to Mythlore, I'd never read anything by Charles
                  Williams (heck, like most people I'd never *heard* of Charles Williams) and
                  really had no desire to. Then I read an article in Mythlore (title and
                  author forgotten, I'm afraid) linking the imagery of All Hallows' Eve to
                  that of Dante's Purgatorio. I was intrigued and began searching for
                  Williams' novels (this was pre-internet days). I finally located a few in a
                  used bookstore, bought them all, and began reading--with All Hallows' Eve,
                  of course. My reaction was, "I didn't know anyone wrote like this!" So,
                  many thanks to whoever wrote that article--for being familiar with both
                  Williams *and* Dante, and for sharing your insights.

                  (I've also belonged to a group that discussed the Divine Comedy and highly
                  recommend the practice.)

                  -- Trudy
                • WendellWag@aol.com
                  In a message dated 11/3/00 11:59:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, Stolzi@aol.com writes:
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 3, 2000
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                    In a message dated 11/3/00 11:59:37 AM Eastern Standard Time, Stolzi@...
                    writes:

                    << But will today's children receive them? >>

                    This is precisely why, among the many books and such that I have given my
                    nephew and nieces for Christmas presents, nothing from Disney has ever
                    included. I don't know whether the complaints in that website you give are
                    true though. I don't see Disney stuff crowding out better books in my
                    nephews and nieces's bookshelves. And in my experience it is possible to
                    ignore such things. I remember seeing many Disney comics, cartoons, and
                    movies as a child, but I soon learned to ignore them and look for better
                    stories.

                    Wendell Wagner
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