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Titius is Christopher Penworth

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  • wendell_wagner
    So you might be wondering who Titius is. And you will definitely be wondering who Christopher Penworth is. Let me explain. In the beginning of The
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 26, 2014

      So you might be wondering who Titius is.  And you will definitely be wondering who Christopher Penworth is.  Let me explain.

       

      In the beginning of The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis, he quotes from a couple of then-recent English composition textbooks for (approximately) senior high school students.  Lewis hid the names of these books and authors under made-up names to avoid embarrassment to the authors.  One of the books he calls The Green Book, and he calls the authors of it Gaius and Titius.  The other book he gives no name to, and he calls the author Orbilius.  The first book is actually the 1939 book The Control of Language: A Critical Approach to Reading and Writing by Alec King and Martin Ketley.  The second book is actually the 1936 book The Reading and Writing of English by E. G. Biaggini.  All three authors were Australians who were born in England.  (The true identities of these books and authors were fairly well known on the Internet when I began my research, and King, Ketley, and Biaggini all eventually learned of their disguised mention in The Abolition of Man.)

       

      I have been doing some research for a while on the origins of The Abolition of Man.  When I learned about the true titles of these two textbooks, I ordered copies of them from online used booksellers.  Luckily, it’s possible to find a copy of almost any book online these days, even textbooks used seventy-odd years ago just in Australia.  I have discovered a great deal of information about these books and other things about The Abolition of Man by endless Googling, E-mailing various people, visiting the Wade Center at Wheaton College, and reading old books that I obtained online.  I gave a talk at the 2011 Mythcon about all the information I had discovered up to that point about the origin of The Abolition of Man.

       

      A surprising amount of what I eventually found wasn't easy to discover.  For instance, I might be the only person to know what all the Riddell Memorial Lectures were.  This is the lecture series in which Lewis gave a talk in 1943 at what was then a branch campus of the University of Durham (now a separate university called the University of Newcastle upon Tyne).  These lectures were published later that year as The Abolition of Man.  Given the long history of this lecture series (1928 to the present) and the number of important people who were the lecturers, you’d think that the lecture series would have a website and a Wikipedia entry.  It has neither.  I found out much information about the history of the founding of the lecture series and the names of the lecturers and the titles of the lectures by enormous amounts of Googling.  I was able to contact the person presently in charge of the series and find out a certain amount of information about the most recent lectures.  I suspect I have the only list in existence of all 64 lectures in the series so far.  I think a history of that lecture series would make an interesting article just by itself.

       

      I also found out a lot of information about King, Ketley, and Biaggini, who may have written bad textbooks but were fascinating people.  At first I thought Biaggini was the most interesting of them.  Unlike King and Ketley, Oxford graduates who were products of English public schools (public schools in the British and Australian sense, which is equivalent to what Americans call prep schools, well-off privately-funded high schools), Biaggini grew up in a lower-class family that didn’t consider sending him to a public school or to university.  His father was a clerk and he became one himself after leaving school at 16.  (Incidentally, he has an Italian last name because his father’s parents immigrated to England from Italy.)  He attempted unsuccessfully to do night college classes.  He gave up on that and took a clerking job on a ship going to Australia.  He decided to stay in Australia.  He worked as a tutor and a high school teacher there and got his bachelor’s degree in his thirties.  He got his master’s degree in his forties and finally got his doctorate in his mid-fifties.  He mostly worked teaching adult education classes and was passionate about the importance of working-class adults continuing to learn all their lives.  Biaggini learned at some point about the mention of his textbook in disguised form in The Abolition of Man and was even willing to refer to himself as Orbilius.  He titles one chapter in the autobiography he wrote late in his life “Orbilius”.

       

      Then I learned about Alec King.  King took a year-long course after his bachelor’s degree to get a teaching certificate.  In that course he met an Australian woman named Catherine Murdoch.  They decided to get married and go to Australia to live.  He spent the rest of his life there, working as a high school teacher and then a college professor, eventually getting a chair at Monash University in Melbourne.  I soon discovered that Catherine Murdoch King had many interesting family connections.  She herself became a radio host on a nationally-broadcast show in Australia.  Her father was Walter Murdoch, a well-known figure in Australian educational circles after whom a university in Perth was named.  Her first cousin once removed is Rupert Murdoch, owner of News Corporation and thus controller of Fox News.

       

      Until last month, I didn’t think Martin Ketley had a particularly interesting life.  Then I discovered the fact that I’ll mention in the next paragraph.  Ketley grew up in London and attended a public school and Oxford.  His tuition and room and board there were paid for by scholarships, so he came from a relatively less well-off family compared to other public school and Oxford students.  He then took a job teaching Latin and English at Guildford Grammar School in Perth for a couple of years.  For several years he then worked independently as a violinist and a tutor in violin, English, and Latin in Perth.  He then taught at another public school in Perth, Christ Church Grammar School, for several years.  For some time he taught at St. Peter’s School in Adelaide.  He then returned to England after twenty years in Australia and spent the rest of his career there teaching at another public school.  He had married an Australian woman, and they had three children, and they all came with him back to England

       

      Just last month I discovered something important about Ketley through a bizarre coincidence.  (Yes, I was being arbitrary in the title of my post by referring to Ketley as Titius.  Ketley’s name came second on the title page of The Control of Language.  Titius came second in the Lewis’s pseudonyms for King and Ketley.  So I referred to Ketley as Titius.)  On June 5th, I read a review in The Washington Post of a recently republished 1937 Australian cult novel, The Young Desire It by Kenneth Mackenzie.  Ordinarily I wouldn't have bothered to look at such a review.  It's a coming-of-age novel, which I don't generally care for, and a preppie coming-of-age novel, which I like even less, and a 1937 Australian preppie coming-of-age novel, which is hopelessly far from anything I would ordinarily read.

       

      However, the review was by Michael Dirda.  Mike is a friend of mine, a Pulitzer Prize winner, and a very widely-read man.  You might remember him from several panels at the 1994 Mythcon in Washington.  Though Mike sometimes often review literary mainstream novels, he also knows much about science fiction, fantasy, and Sherlock Holmes, for instance, so I read his weekly newspaper reviews.  Mike extravagantly praised The Young Desire It, comparing it to James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes.  Other reviewers have compared it to Raymond Radiguet’s Le Diable au Corps, Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks, and Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, so this is definitely a critically praised novel.

       

      I noticed that The Young Desire It was a fictionalized account of Mackenzie's time in a public school in Western Australia in 1927.  Mackenzie calls the semi-autobiographical hero of this novel Charles Fox.  A major character in The Young Desire It is Christopher Penworth, a teacher at this public school.  There were enough things reminiscent about the character Penworth that I looked online for more reviews of the book.  The novel is about a year in the life of the fourteen- (and then fifteen-) year-old Charles Fox who has lived most of his previous life on a farm in Western Australia, where he had lived with and was educated solely by his mother.  During this year he is sent to live and study at a public school in Perth.  During his vacations he meets and falls in love with a girl who lives at a nearby farm.  During his time at the public school, he acquires as a role model this teacher Christopher Penworth.  In the infuriatingly indirect fashion of a 1937 novel, we learn that at the end of the novel Charles loses his virginity to this local girl.  In the infuriating indirect fashion of a 1937 novel, we learn that Penworth doesn't just consider Charles to be his best pupil but has some unrequited sexual interest in him.

       

      I soon discovered that the school that Mackenzie attended himself (and clearly fictionalized in this novel) was Guildford Grammar School in Perth.  I also discovered that Penworth was supposed to be an Oxford graduate, not long out of university, born in England and still homesick for it, who was teaching classics and English at the school and who was a good violinist.  It was clear to me that Martin Ketley very much appeared to be the model for the fictional character of Christopher Penworth.  To find if this was true, I E-mailed Mike Dirda.  He was also intrigued by these resemblances and forwarded my E-mail to Michael Heyward, the head of the Australian publishing firm Text Classics, which published a new Australian edition of The Young Desire It last year (and an American edition this year).  Heyward also thought that it looked like Ketley was the model for Heyward.  He checked the online index of Mackenzie's letters in the Mitchell Collection at the State Library for New South Wales in Sydney.  This is the URL of that index:

       

       http://acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=395275

       

      As you can see, Mackenzie corresponded with both King and Ketley.  (King also somewhat resembles the character Penworth, but King taught at Guildford several years too late to have been the model for Penworth.)  Heyward mailed me, all the way from Australia, the new edition of The Young Desire It.  He suggested I contact people at the Mitchell Collection at the State Library of New South Wales.  So I filled out an online reference question form at this library's website with my questions about the letters in the Mitchell Collection from King and Ketley and from the publisher Jonathan Cape, the original publisher of The Young Desire It.

       

      I received an answer from Susan Mercer, a librarian there.  She read through the letters from Ketley, King, and Jonathan Cape.  One thing she was able to verify from the letters was that King and Ketley did know about the disguised mention of their textbook by Lewis in The Abolition of Man.  She didn’t see any mention of any significance of The Young Desire It in the Jonathan Cape letters.  She says that there is no direct mention of Ketley being the model for Penworth in the Ketley letters, but the attitude that Ketley displays in those letters sounds a great deal like the attitude shown by Penworth in The Young Desire It.  Ketley also speaks of the need to revise The Control of Language, although he doesn’t know if he could ever get around to it (and, in fact, he never did).

        

      So it appears that Martin Ketley, otherwise no one of any fame, is fictionalized in two reasonably famous books.

       

      Wendell Wagner

    • Jason Fisher
      Fascinating discoveries, Wendell, and some impressive sleuthing! Thanks very much for sharing. :) Best, Jason ... might be wondering who Titius is.  And you
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 26, 2014
        Fascinating discoveries, Wendell, and some impressive sleuthing! Thanks very much for sharing. :)

        Best,
        Jason

        From: "WendellWag@... [mythsoc]" <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 9:41 AM
        Subject: [mythsoc] Titius is Christopher Penworth

         
        So you might be wondering who Titius is.  And you will definitely be wondering who Christopher Penworth is.  Let me explain.
         
        In the beginning of The Abolition of Man by C. S. Lewis, he quotes from a couple of then-recent English composition textbooks for (approximately) senior high school students.  Lewis hid the names of these books and authors under made-up names to avoid embarrassment to the authors.  One of the books he calls The Green Book, and he calls the authors of it Gaius and Titius.  The other book he gives no name to, and he calls the author Orbilius.  The first book is actually the 1939 book The Control of Language: A Critical Approach to Reading and Writing by Alec King and Martin Ketley.  The second book is actually the 1936 book The Reading and Writing of English by E. G. Biaggini.  All three authors were Australians who were born in England.  (The true identities of these books and authors were fairly well known on the Internet when I began my research, and King, Ketley, and Biaggini all eventually learned of their disguised mention in The Abolition of Man.)
         
        I have been doing some research for a while on the origins of The Abolition of Man.  When I learned about the true titles of these two textbooks, I ordered copies of them from online used booksellers.  Luckily, it’s possible to find a copy of almost any book online these days, even textbooks used seventy-odd years ago just in Australia.  I have discovered a great deal of information about these books and other things about The Abolition of Man by endless Googling, E-mailing various people, visiting the Wade Center at Wheaton College, and reading old books that I obtained online.  I gave a talk at the 2011 Mythcon about all the information I had discovered up to that point about the origin of The Abolition of Man.
         
        A surprising amount of what I eventually found wasn't easy to discover.  For instance, I might be the only person to know what all the Riddell Memorial Lectures were.  This is the lecture series in which Lewis gave a talk in 1943 at what was then a branch campus of the University of Durham (now a separate university called the University of Newcastle upon Tyne).  These lectures were published later that year as The Abolition of Man.  Given the long history of this lecture series (1928 to the present) and the number of important people who were the lecturers, you’d think that the lecture series would have a website and a Wikipedia entry.  It has neither.  I found out much information about the history of the founding of the lecture series and the names of the lecturers and the titles of the lectures by enormous amounts of Googling.  I was able to contact the person presently in charge of the series and find out a certain amount of information about the most recent lectures.  I suspect I have the only list in existence of all 64 lectures in the series so far.  I think a history of that lecture series would make an interesting article just by itself.
         
        I also found out a lot of information about King, Ketley, and Biaggini, who may have written bad textbooks but were fascinating people.  At first I thought Biaggini was the most interesting of them.  Unlike King and Ketley, Oxford graduates who were products of English public schools (public schools in the British and Australian sense, which is equivalent to what Americans call prep schools, well-off privately-funded high schools), Biaggini grew up in a lower-class family that didn’t consider sending him to a public school or to university.  His father was a clerk and he became one himself after leaving school at 16.  (Incidentally, he has an Italian last name because his father’s parents immigrated to England from Italy.)  He attempted unsuccessfully to do night college classes.  He gave up on that and took a clerking job on a ship going to Australia.  He decided to stay in Australia.  He worked as a tutor and a high school teacher there and got his bachelor’s degree in his thirties.  He got his master’s degree in his forties and finally got his doctorate in his mid-fifties.  He mostly worked teaching adult education classes and was passionate about the importance of working-class adults continuing to learn all their lives.  Biaggini learned at some point about the mention of his textbook in disguised form in The Abolition of Man and was even willing to refer to himself as Orbilius.  He titles one chapter in the autobiography he wrote late in his life “Orbilius”.
         
        Then I learned about Alec King.  King took a year-long course after his bachelor’s degree to get a teaching certificate.  In that course he met an Australian woman named Catherine Murdoch.  They decided to get married and go to Australia to live.  He spent the rest of his life there, working as a high school teacher and then a college professor, eventually getting a chair at Monash University in Melbourne.  I soon discovered that Catherine Murdoch King had many interesting family connections.  She herself became a radio host on a nationally-broadcast show in Australia.  Her father was Walter Murdoch, a well-known figure in Australian educational circles after whom a university in Perth was named.  Her first cousin once removed is Rupert Murdoch, owner of News Corporation and thus controller of Fox News.
         
        Until last month, I didn’t think Martin Ketley had a particularly interesting life.  Then I discovered the fact that I’ll mention in the next paragraph.  Ketley grew up in London and attended a public school and Oxford.  His tuition and room and board there were paid for by scholarships, so he came from a relatively less well-off family compared to other public school and Oxford students.  He then took a job teaching Latin and English at Guildford Grammar School in Perth for a couple of years.  For several years he then worked independently as a violinist and a tutor in violin, English, and Latin in Perth.  He then taught at another public school in Perth, Christ Church Grammar School, for several years.  For some time he taught at St. Peter’s School in Adelaide.  He then returned to England after twenty years in Australia and spent the rest of his career there teaching at another public school.  He had married an Australian woman, and they had three children, and they all came with him back to England
         
        Just last month I discovered something important about Ketley through a bizarre coincidence.  (Yes, I was being arbitrary in the title of my post by referring to Ketley as Titius.  Ketley’s name came second on the title page of The Control of Language.  Titius came second in the Lewis’s pseudonyms for King and Ketley.  So I referred to Ketley as Titius.)  On June 5th, I read a review in The Washington Post of a recently republished 1937 Australian cult novel, The Young Desire It by Kenneth Mackenzie.  Ordinarily I wouldn't have bothered to look at such a review.  It's a coming-of-age novel, which I don't generally care for, and a preppie coming-of-age novel, which I like even less, and a 1937 Australian preppie coming-of-age novel, which is hopelessly far from anything I would ordinarily read.
         
        However, the review was by Michael Dirda.  Mike is a friend of mine, a Pulitzer Prize winner, and a very widely-read man.  You might remember him from several panels at the 1994 Mythcon in Washington.  Though Mike sometimes often review literary mainstream novels, he also knows much about science fiction, fantasy, and Sherlock Holmes, for instance, so I read his weekly newspaper reviews.  Mike extravagantly praised The Young Desire It, comparing it to James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Alain-Fournier’s Le Grand Meaulnes.  Other reviewers have compared it to Raymond Radiguet’s Le Diable au Corps, Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks, and Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage, so this is definitely a critically praised novel.
         
        I noticed that The Young Desire It was a fictionalized account of Mackenzie's time in a public school in Western Australia in 1927.  Mackenzie calls the semi-autobiographical hero of this novel Charles Fox.  A major character in The Young Desire It is Christopher Penworth, a teacher at this public school.  There were enough things reminiscent about the character Penworth that I looked online for more reviews of the book.  The novel is about a year in the life of the fourteen- (and then fifteen-) year-old Charles Fox who has lived most of his previous life on a farm in Western Australia, where he had lived with and was educated solely by his mother.  During this year he is sent to live and study at a public school in Perth.  During his vacations he meets and falls in love with a girl who lives at a nearby farm.  During his time at the public school, he acquires as a role model this teacher Christopher Penworth.  In the infuriatingly indirect fashion of a 1937 novel, we learn that at the end of the novel Charles loses his virginity to this local girl.  In the infuriating indirect fashion of a 1937 novel, we learn that Penworth doesn't just consider Charles to be his best pupil but has some unrequited sexual interest in him.
         
        I soon discovered that the school that Mackenzie attended himself (and clearly fictionalized in this novel) was Guildford Grammar School in Perth.  I also discovered that Penworth was supposed to be an Oxford graduate, not long out of university, born in England and still homesick for it, who was teaching classics and English at the school and who was a good violinist.  It was clear to me that Martin Ketley very much appeared to be the model for the fictional character of Christopher Penworth.  To find if this was true, I E-mailed Mike Dirda.  He was also intrigued by these resemblances and forwarded my E-mail to Michael Heyward, the head of the Australian publishing firm Text Classics, which published a new Australian edition of The Young Desire It last year (and an American edition this year).  Heyward also thought that it looked like Ketley was the model for Heyward.  He checked the online index of Mackenzie's letters in the Mitchell Collection at the State Library for New South Wales in Sydney.  This is the URL of that index:
         
         
        As you can see, Mackenzie corresponded with both King and Ketley.  (King also somewhat resembles the character Penworth, but King taught at Guildford several years too late to have been the model for Penworth.)  Heyward mailed me, all the way from Australia, the new edition of The Young Desire It.  He suggested I contact people at the Mitchell Collection at the State Library of New South Wales.  So I filled out an online reference question form at this library's website with my questions about the letters in the Mitchell Collection from King and Ketley and from the publisher Jonathan Cape, the original publisher of The Young Desire It.
         
        I received an answer from Susan Mercer, a librarian there.  She read through the letters from Ketley, King, and Jonathan Cape.  One thing she was able to verify from the letters was that King and Ketley did know about the disguised mention of their textbook by Lewis in The Abolition of Man.  She didn’t see any mention of any significance of The Young Desire It in the Jonathan Cape letters.  She says that there is no direct mention of Ketley being the model for Penworth in the Ketley letters, but the attitude that Ketley displays in those letters sounds a great deal like the attitude shown by Penworth in The Young Desire It.  Ketley also speaks of the need to revise The Control of Language, although he doesn’t know if he could ever get around to it (and, in fact, he never did).
          
        So it appears that Martin Ketley, otherwise no one of any fame, is fictionalized in two reasonably famous books.
         
        Wendell Wagner


      • David Bratman
        If nothing else, I d like to see that list of Riddell lectures put up on Wikipedia or somewhere. I did something like that once, and am thereby largely
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 26, 2014
          If nothing else, I'd like to see that list of Riddell lectures put up on Wikipedia or somewhere.

          I did something like that once, and am thereby largely responsible for the Wikipedia list of the Charles Eliot Norton lectures from Yale.
        • wendell_wagner
          Appendix: The Riddell Memorial Lectures Academic Year/Lecturer/Topic/Lecture Number 1928-1929 C. C. J. Webb Religion and the Thought of Today, 1st Lecture
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 26, 2014

            Appendix: The Riddell Memorial Lectures

             

            Academic Year/Lecturer/Topic/Lecture Number

             

            1928-1929 C. C. J. Webb Religion and the Thought of Today, 1st Lecture

            1929-1930 William Mundell Thornton The Scientific Background of the Christian Creeds, 2nd Lecture

            1930-1931 Oliver Chase Quick Philosophy and the Cross, 3rd Lecture

            1931-1932 Sir J. Arthur Thomson Purpose in Evolution, 4th Lecture

            1932-1933 William Ralph Inge The Eternal Values, 5th Lecture

            1933-1934 J. L. Stocks On the Nature and Grounds of Religious Beliefs, 6th Lecture

            1934-1935 Bronislaw Malinowski The Foundations of Faith and Morality, 7th Lecture

            1935-1936 Charles E. Raven Evolution and the Christian Conception of God, 8th Lecture

            1936-1937 Tom Hatherley Pear Religion and Contemporary Psychology, 9th Lecture

            1937-1938 F. M. Powicke History, Freedom and Religion, 10th Lecture

            1938-1939 William George De Burgh Knowledge of the Individual, 11th Lecture

            1939-1940 Robert Henry Thouless Conventionalization and Assimilation in Religious Movements as Problems in Social Psychology, 12th Lecture

            1940-1941 William Henry Bragg Science and Faith, 13th Lecture

            1941-1942 Sir Edmund Whittaker The Beginning and End of the World, 14th Lecture

            1942-1943 C. S. Lewis The Abolition of Man, 15th Lecture

            1943-1944 Lord Eustace Percy The Unknown State; a Plea for the Study of Government, 16th Lecture

            1944-1945 John Baillie What Is Christian Civilization?, 17th Lecture

            1945-1946 Michael Polanyi Science, Faith, and Society, 18th Lecture

            1946-1947 Arthur David Ritchie Science and Politics, 19th Lecture

            1947-1948 I. A. Richmond Archaeology, and the After-Life in Pagan and Christian Imagery, 20th Lecture

            1948-1949 Sir Walter Moberly Responsibility, 21st Lecture

            1949-1950 Frederic Bartlett Religion as Experience, Belief, and Action, 22nd Lecture

            1950-1951 Herbert Butterfield Christianity in European History, 23rd Lecture

            1951-1952 Herbert Arthur Hodges Languages: Standpoints and Attitudes, 244h Lecture

            1952-1953 Charles Coulson Christianity in an Age of Science, 25th Lecture

            1953-1954 Sir Thomas Murray Taylor The Discipline of Virtue: Reflections on Law and Liberty, 26th Lecture

            1954-1955 Reginald O. Kapp Facts and Faith: The Dual Nature of Reality, 27th Lecture

            1955-1956 Helen Gardner The Limits of Literary Criticism: Reflections on the Interpretation of Poetry and Scripture, 28th Lecture

            1956-1957 Herbert George Wood Freedom and Necessity in History, 29th Lecture

            1957-1958 Sir Russell Brain The Nature of Experience, 30th Lecture

            1958-1959 Walter Alexander Whitehouse Order, Goodness and Glory: A Religious View of Nature, 31st Lecture

            1959-1960 Nora K. Chadwick The Age of the Saints – a Literary and Historical Study of the Early Celtic Church, 32nd Lecture

            1960-1961 William Homan Thorpe Biology and the Nature of Man, 33rd Lecture

            1961-1962 Denys Lawrence Munby The Idea of a Secular Society, 34th Lecture

            1963-1964 The Reverend Canon Ian T. Ramsey Christian Discourse and Argument, 35th Lecture

            1964-1965 Alasdair MacIntyre Secularization and Moral Change, 36th Lecture

            1965-1966 David Daube Collaboration with Tyranny in Rabbinic Law, 37th Lecture

            1966-1967 C. H. Waddington Biology and Human Purpose, 38th Lecture

            1967-1968 David Gwilym James Henry Sidgwick: Science and Faith in Victorian England, 39th Lecture

            1968-1969 Robert Charles Zaehner Dialectical Christianity and Christian Materialism, 40th Lecture

            1969-1970 Christopher Hill Antichrist in Seventeenth Century England, 41st Lecture

            1970-1971 D. M. Mackinnon Some Reflections on the Relation of Religion and Ethics, 42nd Lecture

            1971-1972 Sir Desmond Pond The Deserted Temple, 43rd Lecture

            1972-1973 Kathleen Coburn The Self Conscious Imagination: a Consideration of Coleridge’s Notebooks, 44th Lecture

            1974-1975 Bryan R. Wilson Contemporary Transformations of Religion, 45th Lecture

            1976-1977 David MacCrimmon MacKay Science, Chance and Providence, 46th Lecture

            1978-1979 J. H. Hick Meaning and Experience in Religion, 47th Lecture

            1980-1981 Geza Vermes The Gospel of Jesus the Jew, 48th Lecture

            1982-1983 Cyril Mango How Constantinople Became the New Jerusalem, 49th Lecture

            1984-1985 John Bowker Licensed Insanities: Religions and the Belief in God, 50th Lecture

            1986-1987 Dewi Zephaniah Phillips God’s Word and Our Words, 51st Lecture

            1988-1989 Stanley Hauerwas Happiness, the Life of Virtue and Fellowship, 52nd Lecture

            1990-1991 John Polkinghorne Reason and Reality – The Interaction of Science and Theology, 53rd Lecture

            1992-1993 Jonathan Sacks Judaism and Contemporary Moral Dilemmas, 54th Lecture

            1994-1995 Lord Walton of Detchant Dilemmas of Life and Death, 55th Lecture

            1996-1997 John Hapgood Are Persons Possible?, 56th Lecture

            1998-1999 Sarah Coakley Knowing Otherwise: Gender, Philosophy, and ‘Religious Experience’, 57th Lecture

            2000-2001 Archbishop Rowan Williams Temptation and Self-Knowledge: How Early Christianity Shapes the Modern Self, 58th Lecture

            2002-2003 Eamon Duffy People Praying, 59th Lecture

            2005-2006 Dame Elizabeth Butler-Sloss Judicial Perspectives on Ethical Dilemmas, 60th Lecture

            2007-2008 Alister McGrath Standing on the Shore of the Ocean of Truth: Natural Theology, Natural Science, and the Human Quest for Meaning, 61st Lecture

            2010-2011 Richard Bauckham Our Ecological Woes – A Christian Response, 62nd Lecture

            2011-2012 Father Timothy Radcliffe OP Imagining Christian Truth, 63rd Lecture

            2013-2014 Ilora Finlay, Baroness Finlay of Llandaff, The Challenges of Terminal Illness, 64th Lecture

             

            Note that in the early 1970's, the lectures changed to approximately (but not exactly) once every two years.

             

            Wendell Wagner

             
            In a message dated 7/26/2014 2:17:46 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, mythsoc@yahoogroups.com writes:
             

            If nothing else, I'd like to see that list of Riddell lectures put up on Wikipedia or somewhere.

            I did something like that once, and am thereby largely responsible for the Wikipedia list of the Charles Eliot Norton lectures from Yale.

          • David Bratman
            Thanks for the list of lecturers, Wendell. Some famous names in there, a couple with interesting connections to Lewis. What was your source or sources for
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 27, 2014
              Thanks for the list of lecturers, Wendell. Some famous names in there, a
              couple with interesting connections to Lewis.

              What was your source or sources for this? I may try to create a Wikipedia
              entry, but it won't be soon, and I will need mighty charms to ward off the
              irritating Wikipedia editors, who love to delete anything that one adds, no
              matter how useful, while leaving reams of useless pre-existing trivia
              untouched.

              DB
            • wendell_wagner
              Unfortunately, there s no simple way to give sources for the list. I found most of the early lectures by Googling on the phrase Riddell Memorial Lecture .
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 27, 2014
                Unfortunately, there's no simple way to give sources for the list.  I found most of the early lectures by Googling on the phrase "Riddell Memorial Lecture".  This gave me names, years, and titles up to the early 1970's.  In the early 1970's, there was apparently a major change in how the series was run.  A trust was established by Walter Buchanan-Riddell not long after the death of his father (Sir John Buchanan-Riddell) in 1924 to fund the series as a memorial to him, probably with some additional contributions by other people.  It appears that the trust fund started to run out of money in the early 1970's.  At that point the university had to pay for most of the cost of the lectures.  So at that point the series became (approximately) every two years instead of one, there were just two lectures on consecutive nights by the lecturer instead of three lectures on consecutive nights, and the university and the trust fund no longer contributed to the cost of the publication of the lectures.
                 
                This meant that the lectures were mostly no longer published.  The reason that I could get the names of the earlier lectures was that the published lectures came up when I Googled on "Riddell Memorial Lecture" from the title page of the publications.  Some later lectures came up because they were mentioned in a Wikipedia article or some other website for the lecturer.  A few recent lectures are from the Internet age, so the announcement by the university is still online.  I got a few of the most recent titles by E-mailing the person at the university whose job (apparently among many other things) is as administrator for the lecture series.  Unfortunately, the only way to footnote the lectures that I know of is to have a series of 64 footnotes, one for each year, that connects to one of the mentions online of that particular lecture.
                 
                Wendell Wagner
                 
                In a message dated 7/27/2014 1:17:02 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, mythsoc@yahoogroups.com writes:
                 

                Thanks for the list of lecturers, Wendell. Some famous names in there, a
                couple with interesting connections to Lewis.

                What was your source or sources for this? I may try to create a Wikipedia
                entry, but it won't be soon, and I will need mighty charms to ward off the
                irritating Wikipedia editors, who love to delete anything that one adds, no
                matter how useful, while leaving reams of useless pre-existing trivia
                untouched.

                DB

              • James Curcio
                Yeah, though I understand in theory why a lot of wiki rules exist, in practice they sometimes create some stupid issues. As one instance of many, there was
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 27, 2014

                  Yeah, though I understand in theory why a lot of wiki rules exist, in practice they sometimes create some stupid issues.

                  As one instance of many, there was incorrect information in the entry on one of my books. This wasn't a matter of opinion but a matter of dates and other similar facts, like getting the title of the sequel wrong. A friend pointed it out to me, I corrected it, and then it was reverted back because a creator can't edit entries about them or their work.

                  Of course this is a good rule of thumb, and if I had changed it to "...is the best book ever!" or whatever, reverting would make sense. But insisting on the rule even when it decreases the accuracy of information seems contrary to the spirit of the endeavor, regardless of how much it is "the rules".

                  I've also noticed that many wiki editors maintain personal domains that include the ideological slant of their pet pages. Sometimes the appearance of objectivity is a means of cloaking inevitable bias.

                  And of course when you first create an article it comes under more immediate scrutiny, which should be the case but I have followed many interesting articles that were later deleted for not being " important " while articles that IMO are far less notable continue unchecked.

                  (I still think we're all better off with a Wikipedia in the world, don't get me wrong.)

                  Take A Trip Past The Event Horizon of Sanity:
                  http://www.PartyAtTheWorldsEnd.com
                  Sept 2014

                  On Jul 27, 2014 11:59 AM, "'David Bratman' dbratman@... [mythsoc]" <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                   

                  Thanks for the list of lecturers, Wendell. Some famous names in there, a
                  couple with interesting connections to Lewis.

                  What was your source or sources for this? I may try to create a Wikipedia
                  entry, but it won't be soon, and I will need mighty charms to ward off the
                  irritating Wikipedia editors, who love to delete anything that one adds, no
                  matter how useful, while leaving reams of useless pre-existing trivia
                  untouched.

                  DB

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