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Re: [mythsoc] Books and children

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  • LSolarion@aol.com
    In a message dated 09/16/2000 9:23:43 AM Pacific Daylight Time, Stolzi@aol.com writes:
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 30, 2000
      In a message dated 09/16/2000 9:23:43 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
      Stolzi@... writes:

      <<
      Were there books you loved as a child that wouldn't pass muster now? <<

      Doctor Doolittle.

      >> Are there adult books that =are= "as good as the ones you loved as a
      child"? I
      would nominate Jane Austen, whom I couldn't stand as a child and now
      appreciate richly. >>


      Same here. For the most part, the "children's" books I enjoy today (Alcott,
      the White Company, The Hobbit, Narnia) are books I first read as an adult.
      Books I enjoyed as a child, the Oz books for example, leave me unimpressed
      today. An exception is Howard Pyle's Robin Hood (with his illustrations, of
      course). I read that with the same unalloyed delight with which I read it as
      a schoolboy.
    • Lisa Deutsch Harrigan
      ... I first read it as an adult and enjoyed it a lot. So yes, it does hold up quite well. Interestingly, I wasn t crazy about the Wizard of Oz series as a kid,
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 30, 2000
        LSolarion@... wrote:

        >
        > Same here. For the most part, the "children's" books I enjoy
        > today (Alcott, the White Company, The Hobbit, Narnia) are books
        > I first read as an adult. Books I enjoyed as a child, the Oz
        > books for example, leave me unimpressed today. An exception is
        > Howard Pyle's Robin Hood (with his illustrations, of course). I
        > read that with the same unalloyed delight with which I read it
        > as a schoolboy.

        I first read it as an adult and enjoyed it a lot. So yes, it does
        hold up quite well.

        Interestingly, I wasn't crazy about the Wizard of Oz series as a
        kid, I only grew to understand that as a adult. I actually found
        most of the characterizations annoying as a kid. I've found I can
        better enjoy his world creation with adult mind. It also helps
        that I can better separate it from a certain movie. I actually
        liked Return to Oz better in some ways, because it had some of
        the darker feeling of the original books. It still isn't a
        favorite series of mine however, and I wouldn't force it on my
        kids.

        Little Harold, now 11, has just read L'Engle's Wrinkle in Time
        and enjoyed it. He has to do a book report on a Newbery
        Medal/Honor book and we had that one. He says he'll now be
        looking for the rest of her books. He'll also believe me when I
        tell him he'll like other Newbery mentions that we have around
        the house. Mostly SF&F of course. I've read Wrinkle in Time
        several times, first as a child and it too holds up well. Lots of
        stuff you understand better as an adult, but don't need to
        understand as a child to enjoy the story.

        Spring Valley High (?), something like that was all the rage when
        Jenevieve was 12. She's tossed them all. Somehow she still likes
        Sword of Shanana, but she read that before she read Lord of the
        Rings.

        I think that is the power of an outstanding children's
        book/movie/TV show is how many levels it works on. If there are
        some nice things/levels for the adults, the story will stay
        around a lot longer. If the levels are shallow forget about it.

        Lisa
      • Stolzi@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/30/00 2:32:34 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Is that general, or just because of the politically incorrect parts about Prince Bumppo, or
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 30, 2000
          In a message dated 9/30/00 2:32:34 PM Central Daylight Time,
          LSolarion@... writes:

          > In a message dated 09/16/2000 9:23:43 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
          > Stolzi@... writes:
          >
          > <<
          > Were there books you loved as a child that wouldn't pass muster now? <<
          >
          > Doctor Doolittle.

          Is that general, or just because of the politically incorrect parts about
          Prince Bumppo, or whatever his name was? I was rather pleased to see there
          is a modern edition which has changed that, so modern children can still read
          them.

          I suspect I'd still like Lofting's curiously dry style and even more dry
          illustrations. I know as a child I loved them, read them over and over.

          The Pushmi-Pullyu was great!

          Mary S
        • ERATRIANO@aol.com
          I ve
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 1, 2000
            << I suspect I'd still like Lofting's curiously dry style and even more dry
            illustrations. I know as a child I loved them, read them over and over. >>

            I've read them again, now and then. Love the Cat's-Meat-Man, too. They are
            dated, but so is Kipling, and many of the others that we still love. Didn't
            I get chewed out a while ago right here on this list for saying something was
            dated? LOL

            Lizzie
          • Christine Howlett
            Honey, so many of US are dated, we tend to be a little sensitive! Not but what I believe (from my datedness?) that many of these older stories still have a
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 1, 2000
              Honey, so many of US are dated, we tend to be a little sensitive! Not but
              what I believe (from my datedness?) that many of these older stories still
              have a lot of magic and wisdome left in them. Now if I can just convince my
              nieces that I do, too...
              Christine

              -----Original Message-----
              From: ERATRIANO@... <ERATRIANO@...>
              To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
              Date: Sunday, October 01, 2000 8:01 AM
              Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Books and children


              ><< I suspect I'd still like Lofting's curiously dry style and even more dry
              > illustrations. I know as a child I loved them, read them over and over.
              >>
              >
              >I've read them again, now and then. Love the Cat's-Meat-Man, too. They
              are
              >dated, but so is Kipling, and many of the others that we still love.
              Didn't
              >I get chewed out a while ago right here on this list for saying something
              was
              >dated? LOL
              >
              >Lizzie
              >
              >
              >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              >
              >
            • ERATRIANO@aol.com
              In a message dated 10/01/2000 10:16:45 AM Eastern Daylight Time, chowlett@erols.com writes: Give
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 1, 2000
                In a message dated 10/01/2000 10:16:45 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                chowlett@... writes:

                << Now if I can just convince my nieces that I do, too... >>

                Give them the books. After a few times they might start associating you with
                the magic.

                Lizzie
              • Paul F. Labaki
                ... Many many, but most significantly _Indian Paint_ by Glenn Balch (copyright 1942, but still holding up very nicely in 1969 when I read it as a second
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 4, 2000
                  > <<
                  > Were there books you loved as a child that wouldn't pass muster now? <<
                  >
                  > Doctor Doolittle.
                  >

                  Many many, but most significantly _Indian Paint_ by Glenn Balch (copyright
                  1942, but still holding up very nicely in 1969 when I read it as a second
                  grader) and the various beast fables of Thornton W. Burgess which I found
                  enchanting as a child. I now find them tedious, unlike AEsop's fables which
                  I still enjoy, but in relatively small doses.


                  >>> Are there adult books that =are= "as good as the ones you loved as a

                  > Books I enjoyed as a child, the Oz books for example, leave me unimpressed
                  > today. An exception is Howard Pyle's Robin Hood (with his illustrations, of
                  > course). I read that with the same unalloyed delight with which I read it as
                  > a schoolboy.

                  This remains one of my most loved stories. I read it every 2 years. Pyle
                  brings to life a fairy tale England, but one we can recognize and accept as
                  our own because it is populated by men and women who revel in lives raw with
                  emotion; they revel and sorrow just like us and a little more extreme. The
                  lack of the supernatural, magic and the existence of fairies keeps it
                  plausible. the joy of life Pyle depicts is contagious and the reader sets
                  the book down in better humor than when he began to read (at least I
                  invariably do).

                  Peace,
                  Paul>
                  > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                  >
                • vaar aragon
                  ... unimpressed ... THe OZ books to me are good entertainment but poor literature...I think some of the darker ones-Ozma of Oz, Glinda of Oz, maybe Land of Oz
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 4, 2000
                    > > Books I enjoyed as a child, the Oz books for example, leave me
                    unimpressed
                    > > today.

                    THe OZ books to me are good entertainment but poor literature...I
                    think some of the darker ones-Ozma of Oz, Glinda of Oz, maybe Land of
                    Oz (which isn't esp. dark) have enough imagination to overcome the
                    limited writing. The first book, mmm, let's just say that the
                    movie's better than the book deserves ;)
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