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Re: [mythsoc] Lilith

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  • Juliet Blosser
    ... Lilith is probably my favorite of Macdonald s books, followed closely by The Golden Key. I ve also read Phantastes but it didn t stay with me as much...I
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 28, 2000
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      On Thu, Sep 28, 2000 at 03:46:43PM -0500, Melinda Jane Harrison wrote:
      > Hi:
      >
      > Excited newbie still buying books. Anyone on the list read Lilith by George
      > MacDonald?

      Lilith is probably my favorite of Macdonald's books, followed
      closely by The Golden Key. I've also read Phantastes but it
      didn't stay with me as much...I remember originally reading Phantastes
      and Lilith in a single volume. The Curdie books and his fairy
      stories are also favorites of mine and definitely worth reading. :)
      A good volume of his fairy stories is still on my to-buy list,
      though I have The Light Princess in a small paperback with illustrations
      by Maurice Sendak.

      > Would like recommendation to MacDonald's work. I already have Morris's
      > work. What
      > about Lord Dunsany's stories. I only have one. And would appreciate any
      > comments
      > on these writers and others of similar time.

      You can find a selection of Dunsany's work at:
      http://www.interlog.com/~case/support/content.html
    • ERATRIANO@aol.com
      In a message dated 09/28/2000 4:39:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jharrison3@mindspring.com writes: It
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 28, 2000
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        In a message dated 09/28/2000 4:39:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        jharrison3@... writes:

        << Anyone on the list read Lilith by George MacDonald? >>

        It has been a long time, but yes. Lilith and Phantastes and, oh no I've
        forgotten the title again, the one that is something like, but not really,
        "Geordie"... and the short fairie tales. Buy them all, preferably second
        hand, and read them at your leisure. Probably more than once.

        Dunsany I never got into. Maybe someone here will have something compelling
        to say aobut The King of Elfland's Daughter.

        Have you read Morris' work or just have it? I loved the wonderful, dreamy,
        allegorical feel to the pieces I read, was it, the one about e Wood and the
        other about the Well.

        I want my library back out of boxes! It has been like 8 years now since I've
        had bookshelves. *sob* I know that somewhere I have poetry compilatiosn to
        look up the poets that were so kindly recommended recently. Thanks.

        And, another writer, a horror writer, i have recently heard of, August
        Derleth. Should I look into him? I like Lovecraft and Poe both.

        all for now,

        Lizzie
      • ERATRIANO@aol.com
        In a message dated 09/28/2000 4:55:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time, juliet@firinn.org writes:
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 29, 2000
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          In a message dated 09/28/2000 4:55:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          juliet@... writes:

          << A good volume of his fairy stories is still on my to-buy list,
          though I have The Light Princess in a small paperback with illustrations
          by Maurice Sendak.
          >>
          Now that sounds like a book to have. Did Sendak do more of his books?

          Lizzie
        • Juliet Blosser
          ... I also have a matching copy of The Golden Key. My husband got them for me as a Christmas or birthday gift, so I m not sure what others there might be.
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 29, 2000
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            On Fri, Sep 29, 2000 at 12:37:38PM -0400, ERATRIANO@... wrote:
            > In a message dated 09/28/2000 4:55:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            > juliet@... writes:
            >
            > << A good volume of his fairy stories is still on my to-buy list,
            > though I have The Light Princess in a small paperback with illustrations
            > by Maurice Sendak.
            > >>
            > Now that sounds like a book to have. Did Sendak do more of his books?
            >
            I also have a matching copy of The Golden Key. My husband got them for
            me as a Christmas or birthday gift, so I'm not sure what others there
            might be. Ok, I just checked on Amazon and those seem to be the only two.
            They also seem to be available in hardcover.
          • David S. Bratman
            ... You ask a large question, but briefly, in my and others opinion, Dunsany was the most pellucid stylist, and possessed of one of the most verdant
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 29, 2000
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              Jane Harrison wrote:

              > Would like recommendation to MacDonald's work. I already have Morris's
              > work. What
              > about Lord Dunsany's stories. I only have one. And would appreciate any
              > comments on these writers and others of similar time.

              You ask a large question, but briefly, in my and others' opinion, Dunsany
              was the most pellucid stylist, and possessed of one of the most verdant
              imaginations, and the slyest wit, of all fantasists. I confess that
              MacDonald and Morris sometimes put me to sleep (with all of MacDonald's
              dream fantasies, that may not be surprising). Dunsany never does, yet he
              has all their virtues.

              And Juliet Blosser wrote:
              >
              > You can find a selection of Dunsany's work at:
              > http://www.interlog.com/~case/support/content.html

              I find that _how_ I read a work affects strongly my reaction to it, and
              trying to read an author like Dunsany in phosphor is like trying to do
              calm deep-breathing to power rock (though who knows, maybe some people
              do). If you want a more reader-friendly selection of Dunsany, in the
              U.S. there's two of his best novels (The King of Elfland's Daughter and
              The Charwoman's Shadow) currently in print, plus an attractively laid-out
              small press edition of some short stories, under the title of _The
              Hashish Man_. The best current selection of Dunsany, though, is an
              omnibus paperback of most of his best short fiction, under the title
              _Time and the Gods_ (not to be confused with an o.p. shorter collection
              of some of the same stories). All these are available from the
              appropriate online booksellers.


              And David Lenander wrote:

              > _Lilith_ had an enormous impact on me, when I
              > read it at about age 15 (what year did Carter republish it?)

              It was one of the first books in the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series:
              September of 1969.

              David Bratman
              - not responsible for the following advertisement -
            • vaar aragon
              ... by George ... Title character & her domain are one of my favorite takes on the vampire overlord concept (memo to Dracula: you re a ruddy amateur ;) The
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 2, 2000
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                --- In mythsoc@egroups.com, Melinda Jane Harrison <jharrison3@m...>
                wrote:
                > Hi:
                >
                > Excited newbie still buying books. Anyone on the list read Lilith
                by George
                > MacDonald?

                Title character & her domain are one of my favorite "takes" on the
                vampire overlord concept (memo to Dracula: you're a ruddy amateur ;)
                The "little people" are also I think rather well done. But somehow
                the whole doesn't quite stand up...something about the concept of two
                different "best beloveds" (inherent in the myth, of course, so
                MacDonald is kinda stuck with it), offends the romantic in me. And
                the reform of a certain major character in the late stages smacks a
                little too much of brainwashing for my taste (I'm w/ Chesterton: "God
                sent man forth a free knight/Who might betray his Lord" or however
                that bit goes).

                Of his other fiction, I prefer Princess & Curdie to Princess & the
                Goblins (they can be read out of order with zero damage to lucidity),
                and my favorites of his fairy tales would be the Day Boy and the
                Night Girl (werewolf alert! Well, sorta, anyway...), and that story
                about the princess who waxes and wanes with the phases of the moon.

                > Would like recommendation to MacDonald's work. I already have
                Morris's
                > work. What
                > about Lord Dunsany's stories. I only have one.

                Had trouble getting into Dunsany, myself. Which is odd, because I
                can blast through Merritt, E.R.Burroughs, Russell Thorndyke,
                Lovecraft w/o a backward glance...
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