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  • Melinda Jane Harrison
    Hello All, I believe I began this thread, though perhaps I was asking _who Peake might have influenced_ and etc. You have to understand I am new to most
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 26, 2000
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      Hello All,

      I believe I began this thread, though perhaps I was asking _who Peake might
      have influenced_
      and etc. You have to understand I am new to most Fantasy. Before 1997, I
      had never read a Fantasy novel of any kind with exception to children's
      literature. So I am a fresh mind here or
      an ignorant one, depending on your view. <G>

      For example, I know there are many _Lord of the Rings_ and Tolkien
      influences. It's written about all the time. Even when a novel is not
      Tolkien-like, his presence might still be considered. Peake on the other
      hand, really does not have that audience [in terms of size and criticisms,
      etc] or even that sort of magic in his novels. And they are highly
      Gothic. Also, he doesn't appear to have a great theme or ethical question,
      which is unusual for so grand a piece. Absurdity did run across my mind as
      well as some ideas or fears on change or maybe not changing. Or risks of
      changing/not changing. Or maybe nothing at all. It has occurred to me
      that Peake may have been [and quite simply] revolting against WWII,
      realism, modernism, and slice of life(s) tales by writing the perfect
      anti-modern novels. The language alone must have caused Graham Greene
      [Peake's friend and contemporary] to be seized with fits and migraines! [ I
      am laughing kindly when I write those words.] It is definitely a form of
      Romanticism. Peake uses language as a tool to impede movement and is
      deliberately repetitive. However, one criticism in the back of the edition
      may have hit on stronger motives. Peake was trained as an artist. I also
      was trained as an artist and it's remarkable the way he describes images.
      He does paint them, and does so in particularly known methods. Off topic
      sort of, but you can see this kind of painting in images in Ridley Scott's
      films. He was trained as an artist and he tends to paint scenes with
      celluloid. It's the same sort of thing, only Peake does it with words,
      layer upon layer.

      I don't happen to agree about reading similar books. Not to say I don't
      understand what Wendell
      is suggesting [he has a valid point], but everything and everyone is
      influenced by someone. Shakespeare, even. For example the poet Browning was
      deeply influenced by the poet Shelley and you can see Shelley in Browning,
      but Browning is a singular poet in his own right. So I guess it was in
      that vain that I was asking. I always look for that when reading. It's a
      bad habit. I never read simply for enjoyment, though maybe my enjoyment is
      exploring or pulling a story to pieces, hence my beginnings in Romanticism
      and ending up in Mythopeic Fantasy. <G>

      Thanks to all who responded on the list. I am emailing some privately. Many
      of the books suggested are out of print. Delia Sherman's Porcelain Dove is
      one I have been wanting to read for a year. I believe the only books
      readily available out of that great list from David L. and David B. and
      others are the Stoddard books. All of the others I will have to get
      through ABE listings. That's what I did for days.

      Out of curiosity, has anyone seen Gormenghast on the BBC? And how many of
      you are really looking forward to the Lord of the Rings movie. I am
      probably a late to this discussion, but interested all the same.

      Again, thanks for the comments and suggestions.
      Jane
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/26/0 12:51:57 PM, Jane Harrison wrote:
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 26, 2000
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        In a message dated 9/26/0 12:51:57 PM, Jane Harrison wrote:

        <<I believe I began this thread, though perhaps I was asking _who Peake might
        have influenced_
        and etc.>>

        Another writer who I think has been strongly influenced by Peake (although
        nobody seems to think of her in that context) is Sherri Tepper. This is
        particularly evident in her early work -- especially in the three trilogies
        set on the word of Lom. There's the same exuberance in grotesque caricature,
        with a talent for coining evocatively unpleasant names and a predilection for
        showing characters greedily holding on to power when the energy has already
        drained out of them. Of course, this manner goes back to Dickens; but in
        Tepper's case I think it's been filtered through Peake.
        Alexei
      • ERATRIANO@aol.com
        In a message dated 09/26/2000 12:39:05 PM Eastern Daylight Time, alexeik@aol.com writes:
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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          In a message dated 09/26/2000 12:39:05 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          alexeik@... writes:

          << Another writer who I think has been strongly influenced by Peake (although
          nobody seems to think of her in that context) is Sherri Tepper. >>

          I have found that Tepper can require a bit of fortitude to read and survive
          the hauntings. I don't think "enjoy" is quite the word to use in regard to
          her books, but I would read several of them again. Should I then avoid
          Peake, if I have such a frail spirit? LOL

          Lizzie
        • David S. Bratman
          ... Goodness no. If one needs fortitude to read Tepper, it s because she s trying to argue a philosophical position in her books (something she shares with
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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            On Tue, 3 Oct 2000 ERATRIANO@... wrote:

            > I have found that Tepper can require a bit of fortitude to read and survive
            > the hauntings. I don't think "enjoy" is quite the word to use in regard to
            > her books, but I would read several of them again. Should I then avoid
            > Peake, if I have such a frail spirit? LOL

            Goodness no. If one needs fortitude to read Tepper, it's because she's
            trying to argue a philosophical position in her books (something she
            shares with Lewis, though their positions are different). Peake is not,
            and I'm sure Alexei is referring to a quite different type of similarity.

            David Bratman
            - not responsible for the following advertisement -
          • ERATRIANO@aol.com
            In a message dated 10/03/2000 2:07:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, dbratman@genie.idt.net writes:
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 3, 2000
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              In a message dated 10/03/2000 2:07:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
              dbratman@... writes:

              << If one needs fortitude to read Tepper, it's because she's
              trying to argue a philosophical position in her books (something she
              shares with Lewis, though their positions are different). Peake is not,
              and I'm sure Alexei is referring to a quite different type of similarity. >>

              Oh, I don't know if that's what I need the energy for. It's more against the
              gruesome images, which could be argued, however, as being part of her
              rhetoric.

              Lizzie
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