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Re: Tolkien as a gateway drug

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  • "Marcel R. Aubron-Bülles"
    When I first read The Lord of the Rings in German I immediately went to the British Council library in Cologne (at that time they weren t all amalgated into
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 6, 2013
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      When I first read "The Lord of the Rings" in German I immediately went
      to the British Council library in Cologne (at that time they weren't all
      amalgated into the one in Berlin only) and asked for a membership which
      they considered odd for a fourteen year old German ;) (that was in 1986,
      mind.)

      Luckily enough, they had LotR, Hobbit and Sil in English there. In
      addition to this I first saw "Pictures by Tolkien" (and to this very day
      want a copy of it) and Barbara Strachey's "Frodo's Journeys." I think
      they even had a copy of "Unfinished Tales" but that was all they had on
      Tolkien.

      As I had run out of eminent fantasy authors (oh, I forgot - they had
      the first Discworld novels and that's when I started reading Pratchett!)
      I fell for Nigel Tranter as I also have a penchant for historical novels
      - the pre-1286 Scotland/Viking stories (Lord of the Isles etc.)

      I never stopped reading. They had Welsh for beginners (I taught myself
      some - see Tolkien); Old English grammars (taught myself some) and I
      tried to have a proper Tolkien exhibition done many years later.
      Unfortunately, the Wall fell and all British Council branches were
      closed, quite in contradiction to historical connections (with Cologne
      being the major city in the British Zone after the war - let's forget
      about that Hamburg thingy ...)

      And all that reading led to me study English Literature and Linguistics.

      --

      Best wishes,

      Marcel Aubron-Bülles

      http://www.thetolkienist.com
    • Jason Fisher
      I remember them being rip-offs of Narnia especially, even more than Tolkien or Donaldson, and White even admitted this in one of the later books. A bunch of
      Message 2 of 26 , Feb 6, 2013
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        I remember them being rip-offs of Narnia especially, even more than Tolkien or Donaldson, and White even admitted this in one of the later books. A bunch of kids in Winnipeg, Canada find an old TV set in an attic, turn it on and see another world, which they are all presently sucked into. Sounds a bit like a cross between the Wardrobe and the painting in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Still, when I read them as a child, I enjoyed the Anthropos books. They didn't stick with me much, except for a few names (King Kardia, Inkleth, etc.) and some of the fine illustrations. I seem to remember one with a giant threatening chicken.

        Nice to know somebody else out there read these too! :)

        Jase


        From: R.J. Anderson <rjawriter@...>
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 11:41 AM
        Subject: [mythsoc] Re: Tolkien as a gateway drug

         
        Jason, I almost mentioned THE TOWER OF GEBURAH myself! Even as a child reader I was appalled at how much he ripped off of Tolkien (I recognized the scene where the children almost get "eaten" by the trees right away), and yet there are some gems of original thinking in there as well. I think THE IRON SCEPTRE holds up better as an original narrative (though my brother says that's John White doing Donaldson instead of John White doing Tolkien, the similarity is less blatant).

        Though a few years later I tried to read the third novel GAAL THE CONQUEROR, and it didn't work for me at all. The heavy-handed psychobabble ("Oh no! We're caught in a Guilt Trap!") was off-putting to say the least, and the story seemed thin and simplistic. Haven't bothered to check out anything else White's written since then.
        --
        Rebecca


      • C.N. Bartch
        Just because I haven t seen anybody mention them yet, I ll throw in that one of the series I ve enjoyed the most after Tolkien drew me into fantasy is the
        Message 3 of 26 , Feb 6, 2013
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          Just because I haven't seen anybody mention them yet, I'll throw in that one of the series I've enjoyed the most after Tolkien drew me into fantasy is the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan.

          ~Chris B.

          On Feb 5, 2013 5:02 AM, "shawnareppert" <evenstar@...> wrote:
           

          OK, here's a question for the group to get some discussion going:

          If Tolkien was for you, as it was for me, your first step into fantasy literature addiction, what was your next step down the path?

          For myself, it was Robin Hood by Paul Creswick. Not strictly fantasy, but it had the same feel, the same elevated language, milieu, heroism and concern for honor.

          Anyone else?

          --Shawna Reppert

          author of The Stolen Luck, coming soon from Carina Press

          www.ShawnaReppert.com

        • JOSEPH
          And how did I forget d Aulaire s Greek Myths and Norse Gods & Giants? And also (and I just had to Google this one up) The Big Joke Game by Scott Corbett? And
          Message 4 of 26 , Feb 6, 2013
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            And how did I forget d'Aulaire's Greek Myths and Norse Gods & Giants? And also (and I just had to Google this one up) The Big Joke Game by Scott Corbett? And probably some of Andre Norton's colored magic books.

            As far as SF, I came to that early also -- I obsessively read John Christopher's Tripods trilogy, and Dad had a bunch of Heinlein juveniles.

            --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "shawnareppert" wrote:
            >
            > OK, here's a question for the group to get some discussion going:
            >
            > If Tolkien was for you, as it was for me, your first step into fantasy literature addiction, what was your next step down the path?
            >
            > For myself, it was Robin Hood by Paul Creswick. Not strictly fantasy, but it had the same feel, the same elevated language, milieu, heroism and concern for honor.
            >
            > Anyone else?
            >
            > --Shawna Reppert
            >
            > author of The Stolen Luck, coming soon from Carina Press
            >
            > www.ShawnaReppert.com
            >
          • shawnareppert
            Love all the discussion, especially love seeing my old friends mentioned. Ursula LeGuin, Robin McKinley, Ray Bradbury (Something Wicked This Way Comes, oh,
            Message 5 of 26 , Feb 7, 2013
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              Love all the discussion, especially love seeing my old 'friends' mentioned. Ursula LeGuin, Robin McKinley, Ray Bradbury (Something Wicked This Way Comes, oh, yes.) Patricia McPhillip just keeps getting better and better.

              Surprised no one else mentioned one of my later, twenty-plus year addiction: Charles de Lint. His writing totally rocks my world. Had the privilege to workshop with him, and can report he is also a wonderful gentleman and a superb teacher.


              --Shawna Reppert

              author of The Stolen Luck, coming soon from Carina Press

              www.ShawnaReppert.com
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