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C. S. Lewis news

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  • WendellWag@aol.com
    _http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/entertainment-arts-20426778_ (http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/entertainment-arts-20426778) Wendell Wagner
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 22, 2012
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    • Lisa Padol
      Okay, looking at things in my apartment with a 2012 copyright date that might be eligible for our awards which I ve not yet read, I see: Saladin Ahmen: Throne
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 22, 2012
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        Okay, looking at things in my apartment with a 2012 copyright date that might be eligible for our awards which I've not yet read, I see:

        Saladin Ahmen: Throne of the Crescent Moon
        Mary Gentle: The Black Opera
        Yves Meynard: Chrysanthe
        Patricia McKillip: Wonders of the Invisible World
        Mary Robinette Kowal; The Glamour in Glass

        What I want to know is: Is anyone currently planning to nominate any of the above? I want to prioritize reading things other people haven't yet looked at.

        On my potential to-nominate list:

        China Mieville: Embassytown
        Michael Williams: Vine
        Tim Powers: Hide Me Among the Graves
        Alan Garner: Boneland, which I think means the entire trilogy, which... is going to be odd, as Weirdstone of Brisingamen and Moon of Gomrath are YA / Children's, but Boneland isn't, but I think you really need to have read the first two to made best sense of Boneland.

        For Children's / YA, there's Catherynne Valente's The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland, which I've read, and China Mieville's Railsea, which I have not yet read.

        I also have the lists from folks who helped out before Philcon to fill in gaps -- thanks again! And do feel free to let me know if there are other titles I should try to look at.

        -Lisa
      • Alana Joli Abbott
        The only one of these I ve read is *Chrysanthe,* which had some brilliant moments, but I ended up feeling was complex for the sake of complexity rather than
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 23, 2012
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          The only one of these I've read is Chrysanthe, which had some brilliant moments, but I ended up feeling was complex for the sake of complexity rather than because it added anything to the story. I left it feeling like it might be too cerebral for me, and that someone else might have really gotten it, but I couldn't be sure of that, and my assessment that the writing style actually obscured the story might be accurate. At any rate, it was far too circuitous for me to have gotten any real enjoyment -- or enrichment -- out of.

          I'd actually like to hear from others who have read it to see if my reaction to it is shared, or if someone else found it amazing and couldn't put it down.

          -Alana

          On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 2:17 AM, Lisa Padol <lpadol@...> wrote:
           

          Okay, looking at things in my apartment with a 2012 copyright date that might be eligible for our awards which I've not yet read, I see:

          Saladin Ahmen: Throne of the Crescent Moon
          Mary Gentle: The Black Opera
          Yves Meynard: Chrysanthe
          Patricia McKillip: Wonders of the Invisible World
          Mary Robinette Kowal; The Glamour in Glass

          What I want to know is: Is anyone currently planning to nominate any of the above? I want to prioritize reading things other people haven't yet looked at.

          On my potential to-nominate list:

          China Mieville: Embassytown
          Michael Williams: Vine
          Tim Powers: Hide Me Among the Graves
          Alan Garner: Boneland, which I think means the entire trilogy, which... is going to be odd, as Weirdstone of Brisingamen and Moon of Gomrath are YA / Children's, but Boneland isn't, but I think you really need to have read the first two to made best sense of Boneland.

          For Children's / YA, there's Catherynne Valente's The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland, which I've read, and China Mieville's Railsea, which I have not yet read.

          I also have the lists from folks who helped out before Philcon to fill in gaps -- thanks again! And do feel free to let me know if there are other titles I should try to look at.

          -Lisa




          --
          Alana Joli Abbott, Freelance Writer and Editor (http://www.virgilandbeatrice.com)
          Contributor to Haunted: 11 Tales of Ghostly Horror http://tinyurl.com/haunted-aja
          Author of Into the Reach and Departure http://tinyurl.com/aja-ebooks
          Columnist, "The Town with Five Main Streets" http://branford.patch.com/columns/the-town-with-five-main-streets

          --
          For updates on my writings, join my mailing list at http://groups.google.com/group/alanajoliabbottfans

        • John Rateliff
          Interesting news. Thanks for posting. So, what are the chances of JRRT s getting a memorial there at some point? --John R.
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 26, 2012
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            Interesting news. Thanks for posting.
               So, what are the chances of JRRT's getting a memorial there at some point?
            --John R.


            On Nov 22, 2012, at 5:03 PM, WendellWag@... wrote: 

          • Damien
            Hello, I would assume J.R.R. Tolkien s chances are about nil, since he was Catholic, whereas Westminster Abbey is an Anglican church. Best regards, Damien B.
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 12, 2012
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              Hello,

              I would assume J.R.R. Tolkien's chances are about nil, since he was Catholic, whereas Westminster Abbey is an Anglican church.

              Best regards,
              Damien B.

              --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
              >
              > Interesting news. Thanks for posting.
              > So, what are the chances of JRRT's getting a memorial there at some point?
              > --John R.
              >
              >
              > On Nov 22, 2012, at 5:03 PM, WendellWag@... wrote:
              > > http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/entertainment-arts-20426778
              > > Wendell Wagner
              >
            • davise@cs.nyu.edu
              There are memorials in the Poet s Corner to Alexander Pope and to Oscar Wilde, both of whom where Catholics, so apparently that doesn t make it impossible. --
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 12, 2012
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                There are memorials in the Poet's Corner to Alexander Pope and to Oscar Wilde, both of whom where Catholics, so apparently that doesn't make it impossible.

                -- Ernie

                --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Damien" <d.bador@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello,
                >
                > I would assume J.R.R. Tolkien's chances are about nil, since he was Catholic, whereas Westminster Abbey is an Anglican church.
                >
                > Best regards,
                > Damien B.
                >
                > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Interesting news. Thanks for posting.
                > > So, what are the chances of JRRT's getting a memorial there at some point?
                > > --John R.
                > >
                > >
                > > On Nov 22, 2012, at 5:03 PM, WendellWag@ wrote:
                > > > http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/entertainment-arts-20426778
                > > > Wendell Wagner
                > >
                >
              • Travis Buchanan
                And Charles Darwin is buried there (though not in Poet s Corner, of course). That widens the standard a bit. Travis
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 12, 2012
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                  And Charles Darwin is buried there (though not in Poet's Corner, of course). That widens the standard a bit.

                  Travis



                  On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 2:17 PM, <davise@...> wrote:
                   

                  There are memorials in the Poet's Corner to Alexander Pope and to Oscar Wilde, both of whom where Catholics, so apparently that doesn't make it impossible.

                  -- Ernie



                  --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Damien" <d.bador@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello,
                  >
                  > I would assume J.R.R. Tolkien's chances are about nil, since he was Catholic, whereas Westminster Abbey is an Anglican church.
                  >
                  > Best regards,
                  > Damien B.
                  >
                  > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Interesting news. Thanks for posting.
                  > > So, what are the chances of JRRT's getting a memorial there at some point?
                  > > --John R.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On Nov 22, 2012, at 5:03 PM, WendellWag@ wrote:
                  > > > http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/entertainment-arts-20426778
                  > > > Wendell Wagner
                  > >
                  >


                • Travis Buchanan
                  More on Darwin s burial, if any are curious: The Dean of Westminster, George Granville Bradley, was away in France when he received a telegram forwarded from
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 12, 2012
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                    More on Darwin's burial, if any are curious:

                    The Dean of Westminster, George Granville Bradley, was away in France when he received a telegram forwarded from the President of the Royal Society in London saying “…it would be acceptable to a very large number of our fellow-countrymen of all classes and opinions that our illustrious countryman, Mr Darwin, should be buried in Westminster Abbey”. The Dean recalled “ I did not hesitate as to my answer and telegraphed direct…that my assent would be cheerfully given”. The body lay overnight in the Abbey, in the small chapel of St Faith, and on the morning of 26 April the coffin was escorted by the family and eminent mourners into the Abbey. The pall-bearers included Sir Joseph Hooker, Alfred Russel Wallace, James Russell Lowell (U.S. Ambassador), and William Spottiswoode (President of the Royal Society).

                    The burial service was held in the Lantern, conducted by Canon Prothero, with anthems sung by the choir. The chief mourners then followed the coffin into the north aisle of the Nave where Darwin was buried next to the eminent scientist Sir John Herschel, and a few feet away from Sir Isaac Newton. The simple inscription on his grave reads

                    “CHARLES ROBERT DARWIN BORN 12 FEBRUARY 1809. DIED 19 APRIL 1882”.

                    Although an agnostic, Darwin was greatly respected by his contemporaries and the Bishop of Carlisle, Harvey Goodwin, in a memorial sermon preached in the Abbey on the Sunday following the funeral, said “I think that the interment of the remains of Mr Darwin in Westminster Abbey is in accordance with the judgment of the wisest of his countrymen…It would have been unfortunate if anything had occurred to give weight and currency to the foolish notion which some have diligently propagated, but for which Mr Darwin was not responsible, that there is a necessary conflict between a knowledge of Nature and a belief in God…”. A later, widely believed, rumour of a “deathbed conversion” to Christianity was denied by his daughter, who was actually present at his death.

                    A bronze memorial, with a life-sized relief bust, was erected by his family in the north choir aisle, near to the grave, in 1888. The sculptor was Sir J.E. Boehm. The inscription just says simply DARWIN. (http://www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/people/charles-darwin)




                    On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 2:20 PM, Travis Buchanan <travisbuck7@...> wrote:
                    And Charles Darwin is buried there (though not in Poet's Corner, of course). That widens the standard a bit.

                    Travis



                    On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 2:17 PM, <davise@...> wrote:
                     

                    There are memorials in the Poet's Corner to Alexander Pope and to Oscar Wilde, both of whom where Catholics, so apparently that doesn't make it impossible.

                    -- Ernie



                    --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Damien" <d.bador@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello,
                    >
                    > I would assume J.R.R. Tolkien's chances are about nil, since he was Catholic, whereas Westminster Abbey is an Anglican church.
                    >
                    > Best regards,
                    > Damien B.
                    >
                    > --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Interesting news. Thanks for posting.
                    > > So, what are the chances of JRRT's getting a memorial there at some point?
                    > > --John R.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > On Nov 22, 2012, at 5:03 PM, WendellWag@ wrote:
                    > > > http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/entertainment-arts-20426778
                    > > > Wendell Wagner
                    > >
                    >



                  • Lisa Padol
                    ... I didn t think it was overly complex, let alone complex for the sake of complexity. I had no problem following what was going on. I found it bleak, though
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 8, 2013
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                      > The only one of these I've read is Chrysanthe, which had some brilliant moments, but I ended up feeling was complex for the sake of complexity rather
                      > than because it added anything to the story. I left it feeling like it might be too cerebral for me, and that someone else might have really gotten it, but I
                      > couldn't be sure of that, and my assessment that the writing style actually obscured the story might be accurate. At any rate, it was far too circuitous
                      > for me to have gotten any real enjoyment -- or enrichment -- out of.

                      >
                      > I'd actually like to hear from others who have read it to see if my reaction to it is shared, or if someone else found it amazing and couldn't put it down.


                      I didn't think it was overly complex, let alone complex for the sake of complexity. I had no problem following what was going on. I found it bleak, though myhopoeic. I was very much ready for the much lighter, if not at all mythopoeic, Lord Vorpatril's Alliance afterwards.


                      >Saladin Ahmen: Throne of the Crescent Moon


                      Good, solid book, but I'm not sure if it's for the list. I shan't be surprised if someone else nominates it, though.


                      >Mary Gentle: The Black Opera


                      On the surface, it's got the right elements to be mythopoeic, and it was a fun read. Doesn't make the cut for me, but again, I won't be surprised if someone else nominates it.

                      >Yves Meynard: Chrysanthe


                      Unless I have five other things crowding it out, I will nominate this one. I need to check my list -- I had a lot of eligible titles.


                      >Patricia McKillip: Wonders of the Invisible World
                      >Mary Robinette Kowal; The Glamour in Glass

                      These two I have not yet read. There's also Seanan McGuire's Velveteen Versus novel, but Josh tells me this is likely a wait-until-series-is-complete case.

                      -Lisa
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