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RE: [mythsoc] a different question about G.K.C.

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  • Croft, Janet B.
    Oh, you mean _The Flying Inn_? “The rolling English drunkard made the rolling English road…” Janet From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 22, 2012
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      Oh, you mean _The Flying Inn_?

       

      “The rolling English drunkard made the rolling English road…”

       

      Janet

       

      From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Bratman
      Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2012 9:25 PM
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] a different question about G.K.C.

       

       

      John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:

      >If you were going to recommend one, and only one, book by G.K.C. to someone, which
      >one would it be?

      If the query were made to me in a pub, I would give a copy of _The Man Who Was Thirsty._

    • davise@cs.nyu.edu
      No Father Brown enthusiasts? The few I read didn t do much for me, myself, but my impression is that 80 years ago, those would have been the hands-down
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 23, 2012
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        No Father Brown enthusiasts? The few I read didn't do much for me, myself, but my impression is that 80 years ago, those would have been the hands-down popular favorites. (Or maybe that's just because this is mythsoc and not detectivesoc).

        For non-fiction I again strongly recommend "The Victorian Age in Literature".

        Orwell says that Chesterton's Introductions to Dickens (which is not the same as his critical biography) are "about the best thing he ever wrote". But I don't know if these were ever collected in book form; the only one I've seen is the introduction to Hard Times, which happens to be the one that Orwell discusses.

        -- Ernie


        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
        >
        > Okay, here's a simple question about Chesterton.
        >
        > If you were going to recommend one, and only one, book by G.K.C. to someone, which one would it be?
        >
        > And why.
        >
        > --John R.
        >
      • Bill West
        Count me a Father Brown fan. I had torn through all the Sherlock Holmes canon in one weekend after surgery when I was 12 and looked for more. One of the
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 23, 2012
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          Count me a "Father Brown" fan. I had torn through all the Sherlock Holmes canon in one weekend after surgery when I was 12 and looked for more. One of the Father Brown stories was in our English class textbook at the Catholic school I attended that autumn and I straightaway hunted
          down a collection of the rest at the local library.

          Bill


          On Fri, Mar 23, 2012 at 8:58 AM, <davise@...> wrote:
           

          No Father Brown enthusiasts? The few I read didn't do much for me, myself, but my impression is that 80 years ago, those would have been the hands-down popular favorites. (Or maybe that's just because this is mythsoc and not detectivesoc).

          For non-fiction I again strongly recommend "The Victorian Age in Literature".

          Orwell says that Chesterton's Introductions to Dickens (which is not the same as his critical biography) are "about the best thing he ever wrote". But I don't know if these were ever collected in book form; the only one I've seen is the introduction to Hard Times, which happens to be the one that Orwell discusses.

          -- Ernie

          --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
          >
          > Okay, here's a simple question about Chesterton.
          >
          > If you were going to recommend one, and only one, book by G.K.C. to someone, which one would it be?
          >
          > And why.
          >
          > --John R.
          >


        • David Bratman
          I found the Father Brown stories terminally annoying. Father Brown reaches his conclusions through his intuition into human nature. But human nature, even
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 23, 2012
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            I found the Father Brown stories terminally annoying. Father Brown reaches his conclusions through his intuition into human nature. But human nature, even more than the obscure physical facts which allow Sherlock Holmes to leap to unjustified but somehow always accurate conclusions, is not scientifically rigid or invariable. Father Brown's conclusions are likely and would be the way to bet, but he has no call to be as serenely confident in their infallibility as he is (even Holmes presents his ideas as more tentative), and while he could turn out to be right more often than not, he couldn't always be right. But he is. We're missing the 30%, at least, of Father Brown stories in which his intuition falls flat on its face.


            -----Original Message-----
            >From: davise@...
            >Sent: Mar 23, 2012 5:58 AM
            >To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [mythsoc] Re: a different question about G.K.C.
            >
            >No Father Brown enthusiasts? The few I read didn't do much for me, myself, but my impression is that 80 years ago, those would have been the hands-down popular favorites. (Or maybe that's just because this is mythsoc and not detectivesoc).
            >
            >For non-fiction I again strongly recommend "The Victorian Age in Literature".
            >
            >Orwell says that Chesterton's Introductions to Dickens (which is not the same as his critical biography) are "about the best thing he ever wrote". But I don't know if these were ever collected in book form; the only one I've seen is the introduction to Hard Times, which happens to be the one that Orwell discusses.
            >
            >-- Ernie
            >
            >
            >--- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Okay, here's a simple question about Chesterton.
            >>
            >> If you were going to recommend one, and only one, book by G.K.C. to someone, which one would it be?
            >>
            >> And why.
            >>
            >> --John R.
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >------------------------------------
            >
            >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.orgYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
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