Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] Fan Fiction

Expand Messages
  • Margaret Dean
    ... Indeed there is, and authors like Anne McCaffrey, Mercedes Lackey, and Wendy and Richard Pini tread it successfully, IMO. They simply tell their
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 7, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      ERATRIANO@... wrote:

      > And fan fiction in general; I have seen fanzines from time to time, and some
      > of them have been truly humorous and enjoyable. Though I'm not a Star Trek
      > fan, those 'zines seem to have some of the longest histories, and get stomped
      > on pretty bad as well. I think it's really too bad; such grassroots creative
      > spirit is truly enjoyable, and often better than commercially marketed stuff.
      > I guess were I successful I wouldn't want any old person to do what they
      > liked with my world and people, but still, shouldn't there be a middle ground?

      Indeed there is, and authors like Anne McCaffrey, Mercedes
      Lackey, and Wendy and Richard Pini tread it successfully, IMO.
      They simply tell their creatively-minded fans, "You may use my
      world (sometimes with rules or guidelines imposed), but leave my
      characters alone." I tend to think this would be the most
      successful formula for Narnian fan fiction too (whether produced
      by fans or pros): use the world, but create new characters to
      interact with it.


      --Margaret Dean
      <margdean@...>
    • Diane Joy Baker
      ... And fan fiction in general; I have seen fanzines from time to time, and some ... Trek ... stomped ... I think they ve released three volumes of fanfic for
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 7, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        >
        > In a message dated 09/06/2000 9:08:23 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        > margdean@... writes:
        >
        And fan fiction in general; I have seen fanzines from time to time, and
        some
        > of them have been truly humorous and enjoyable. Though I'm not a Star
        Trek
        > fan, those 'zines seem to have some of the longest histories, and get
        stomped
        > on pretty bad as well.

        I think they've released three volumes of fanfic for Trek called *Strange
        New Worlds*; I'm reading the first volume right now, and some are better
        than some of the "pro" stories released over the years.

        I think it's really too bad; such grassroots creative
        > spirit is truly enjoyable, and often better than commercially marketed
        stuff.
        > I guess were I successful I wouldn't want any old person to do what they
        > liked with my world and people, but still, shouldn't there be a middle
        ground?

        I can't say what they're doing for the Narnia, but it's probably something
        similar to what they've done in the past with releasing later versions of
        *Screwtape Letters* which might be a genre in themselves. These vary widely
        in quality. "Shared world" anthologies might be one way to go, with a
        vetting by a pro editor. I'd hope they'll be very judicious. It's hard for
        me to believe they'd allow this. I'm rather shocked. ---djb.

        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >
        >
      • Wayne G. Hammond
        ... Of course, it may be that the publisher and merchandisers merely _hope_ that there will be new stories set in Narnia, or have put this forward as a
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 7, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Diane wrote:

          >I can't say what they're doing for the Narnia, but it's probably something
          >similar to what they've done in the past with releasing later versions of
          >*Screwtape Letters* which might be a genre in themselves. These vary widely
          >in quality. "Shared world" anthologies might be one way to go, with a
          >vetting by a pro editor. I'd hope they'll be very judicious. It's hard for
          >me to believe they'd allow this. I'm rather shocked. ---djb.

          Of course, it may be that the publisher and merchandisers merely _hope_
          that there will be new stories set in Narnia, or have put this forward as a
          proposal not yet approved. I've seen no statement about this apart from the
          _Publishers Weekly_ report.

          Wayne Hammond
        • Stolzi@aol.com
          In a message dated 09/07/2000 9:12:20 AM Central Daylight Time, ... When we hear that these are for four-year-olds, I wonder if they are simple re-tellings?
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 7, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            In a message dated 09/07/2000 9:12:20 AM Central Daylight Time,
            Wayne.G.Hammond@... writes:

            > new stories set in Narnia,

            When we hear that these are for "four-year-olds," I wonder if they are simple
            re-tellings? There was already a picture series which broke up LWW into
            several shorter stories, more simply told, but I don't know how far it
            progressed - I'd say its age group was a bit above four.

            Mary S
          • David Lenander
            Yes, I know the picture books (and the calendars and paper dolls which used the same art)--I wasn t very impressed with the art, and I never paid much
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 7, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              Yes, I know the picture books (and the calendars and paper dolls which used the
              same art)--I wasn't very impressed with the art, and I never paid much attention
              to the texts. Not really approving of the idea (if they're too young for the
              regular text, they really don't need to hear the books for a couple of years, I
              think--no need to "dumb the Chronicles down" for younger children), I didn't buy
              any of them. I did see some art on the web-page yesterday, though, which makes
              me think that they've found a much superior artist, so these books may be worth
              a second look. I'm not really sure that you couldn't read the regular
              Chronicles to a younger child anyhow--Claire had a remarkable patience with
              texts she barely understood from a very young age if I read them to her.
              Certainly by age 5 I think I could have read LWW to her. Maybe I did (I can't
              remember when I first read this to her).

              Stolzi@... wrote:

              >
              > In a message dated 09/07/2000 9:12:20 AM Central Daylight Time,
              > Wayne.G.Hammond@... writes:
              >
              > > new stories set in Narnia,
              >
              > When we hear that these are for "four-year-olds," I wonder if they are simple
              > re-tellings? There was already a picture series which broke up LWW into
              > several shorter stories, more simply told, but I don't know how far it
              > progressed - I'd say its age group was a bit above four.
              >
              > Mary S
              >
              > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

              --

              David Lenander, Library Manager I

              University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library Access Services

              Diehl Hall / 505 Essex SE, / Mpls., MN 55455

              Phone: work: (612)626-3375 fax: (612)626-2454 home: (651)292-8887

              e-mail: d-lena@... web-page: http://umn.edu/~d-lena/OnceUponATime.html
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.