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Re: [mythsoc] Kingkiller Chronicles

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  • David Emerson
    I hated Name of the Wind and gave up reading it about 2/3 of the way through. I found the viewpoint character odious and detestable, and the plot dragged
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 14, 2012
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      I hated "Name of the Wind" and gave up reading it about 2/3 of the way through.  I found the viewpoint character odious and detestable, and the plot dragged terribly.  I couldn't wait for the novel to be over.  When I glanced at the end of the book and saw that this massive tome was only a third of the story, I (figuratively) threw the book against the wall.

      David Emerson
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Alana Joli Abbott
      Sent: Mar 14, 2012 12:39 PM
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [mythsoc] Kingkiller Chronicles



      Zachary wrote:
      PPS, wanting to change the record: Has anyone else on the list read the first two books in the Kingkiller Chronicles? 

      I've not yet, but I've heard quite good things about them. I'm vaguely waiting to see if it's to officially be a trilogy, at which point I can read them back to back.

      I'd love to hear what others in this group have thought about them, if opinions exist!

      -Alana

      --
      Alana Joli Abbott, Freelance Writer and Editor (http://www.virgilandbeatrice.com)
      Contributor to Haunted: 11 Tales of Ghostly Horror http://tinyurl.com/haunted-aja
      Author of Into the Reach and Departure http://tinyurl.com/aja-ebooks
      Columnist, "The Town with Five Main Streets" http://branford.patch.com/columns/the-town-with-five-main-streets

      --
      For updates on my writings, join my mailing list at http://groups.google.com/group/alanajoliabbottfans



      
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    • Zachary Bos
      Ah! Well, de gustabis. My personal reading habits largely steer around genre fiction, and I ve been wary when dipping my toes back into that pool -- the YA
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 14, 2012
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        Ah! Well, de gustabis. My personal reading habits largely steer around genre fiction, and I've been wary when dipping my toes back into that pool -- the YA stuff is just pablum, and the adult fantasy or speculative fiction often seems pressed out of a mould. I enjoyed the Rothfuss, but, not all will.



        On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:21 PM, David Emerson <emerdavid@...> wrote:


        I hated "Name of the Wind" and gave up reading it about 2/3 of the way through.  I found the viewpoint character odious and detestable, and the plot dragged terribly.  I couldn't wait for the novel to be over.  When I glanced at the end of the book and saw that this massive tome was only a third of the story, I (figuratively) threw the book against the wall.

        David Emerson
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Alana Joli Abbott
        Sent: Mar 14, 2012 12:39 PM
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [mythsoc] Kingkiller Chronicles



        Zachary wrote:
        PPS, wanting to change the record: Has anyone else on the list read the first two books in the Kingkiller Chronicles? 

        I've not yet, but I've heard quite good things about them. I'm vaguely waiting to see if it's to officially be a trilogy, at which point I can read them back to back.

        I'd love to hear what others in this group have thought about them, if opinions exist!

        -Alana

        --
        Alana Joli Abbott, Freelance Writer and Editor (http://www.virgilandbeatrice.com)
        Contributor to Haunted: 11 Tales of Ghostly Horror http://tinyurl.com/haunted-aja
        Author of Into the Reach and Departure http://tinyurl.com/aja-ebooks
        Columnist, "The Town with Five Main Streets" http://branford.patch.com/columns/the-town-with-five-main-streets

        --
        For updates on my writings, join my mailing list at http://groups.google.com/group/alanajoliabbottfans





        ________________________________________
        PeoplePC Online
        A better way to Internet
        http://www.peoplepc.com

      • Bill West
        I agree with your assessment, Zachary. I m looking forward to the third book. There is so little that I like of the new crop of fantasy that I found this a ray
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 14, 2012
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          I agree with your assessment, Zachary. I'm looking forward to the third book. There is
          so little that I like of the new crop of fantasy that I found this a ray of hope.

          Bill West

          On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 2:25 PM, Zachary Bos <zakbos@...> wrote:
           

          The author IS writing them as a trilogy, though there is no publication date for the third book as yet. The prose style is clear and engaging, and I rather enjoy how the mythology underlying the series' spooky Chandrian antagonists is advanced through snippets of story, song, and legend, rather than new developments following the protagonist's recovery of some new mcguffin. The elements are all familiar -- the frame story, the university/rough-and-tumble harbor town/country inn set-pieces, strangely wise tinkers, the main character as a rather fortunately talented prodigy, a clan of fell evil-doers, a brotherhood of grim white-hatted heroes -- but they're handled very well. As for the world-building, the geography is only thinly sketched, and the parts of the story set among the fairy-land Fae rather TOO familiar, but the fictional languages Rothfuss weaves together are verbally rich, and strike the ear as non-arbitrary: in other words, as persuasive. Most winning to me is Rothfuss's way with pithy phrasing that avoids being too-clever, obtaining a quality of wit which belongs both to the characters and to the author. A few examples:

          Of the silence "of three parts" that lay over the inn the story opens in, this is the part that belongs to the innkeeper protagonist: "It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die." Here's a description that the protag says, approvingly, is "without conceit": "He would even sing from time to time. he had a bright, reckless tenor that was always wandering off, looking for notes in the wrong places. More often than not he stopped and laughed at himself when it happened." Ha! And how's this for a well-turned epithet: "Charred body of God!"

          It's the writing's quotable character (rather than its richness of verbal texture, say) that reminds me of Tolkein (as against the expansiveness of the plotting, or the depth of mythopoetic creation that went into the world-building). I'm greatly looking forward to the third book in the series. "The Name of the Wind" is an exceptionally strong first book.

          - Z



          On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 1:39 PM, Alana Joli Abbott <alanajoli@...> wrote:


          Zachary wrote:
          PPS, wanting to change the record: Has anyone else on the list read the first two books in the Kingkiller Chronicles? 

          I've not yet, but I've heard quite good things about them. I'm vaguely waiting to see if it's to officially be a trilogy, at which point I can read them back to back.

          I'd love to hear what others in this group have thought about them, if opinions exist!

          -Alana

          --
          Alana Joli Abbott, Freelance Writer and Editor (http://www.virgilandbeatrice.com)
          Contributor to Haunted: 11 Tales of Ghostly Horror http://tinyurl.com/haunted-aja
          Author of Into the Reach and Departure http://tinyurl.com/aja-ebooks
          Columnist, "The Town with Five Main Streets" http://branford.patch.com/columns/the-town-with-five-main-streets

          --
          For updates on my writings, join my mailing list at http://groups.google.com/group/alanajoliabbottfans





        • Zachary Bos
          Agreed about the meanness of the current crop. Oft hope is born, when all is forlorn. - Z On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:31 PM, Bill West
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 14, 2012
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            Agreed about the meanness of the current crop. "Oft hope is born, when all is forlorn."

            - Z

            On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:31 PM, Bill West <billwest48@...> wrote:


            I agree with your assessment, Zachary. I'm looking forward to the third book. There is
            so little that I like of the new crop of fantasy that I found this a ray of hope.

            Bill West
          • Alana Joli Abbott
            While to each his own taste, I ve found a *lot* of good new fantasy coming out of the finalists for the adult MFA award in the last few years. So if you re
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 14, 2012
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              While to each his own taste, I've found a lot of good new fantasy coming out of the finalists for the adult MFA award in the last few years. So if you're looking for more good fantasy in a variety of different molds, those lists are an awfully good place to start.

              While I know Rothfuss isn't everyone's cup of tea, I won't be at all surprised if the trilogy lands on at least the MFA long list when it's finished. :)

              I've also heard a lot of the same people who rave about Rothfuss say very good things about the Mistborn books (the trilogy, primarily, though there's a new book out in the world) by Brandon Sanderson. I read one of his earlier novels, Elantris, which I very much enjoyed, and one of his YA novels, which I thought excellent.

              I must say that every time I hear the "nothing good ever comes out in our genre" or "such and such author's new work is the salvation of our genre!" (oft said about Rothfuss and high fantasy) about any of the genres I read, I'm always a bit defensive, because I find so much to enjoy in the new crop. But everyone's taste does vary.

              -Alana

              On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:55 PM, Zachary Bos <zakbos@...> wrote:
               

              Agreed about the meanness of the current crop. "Oft hope is born, when all is forlorn."

              - Z



              On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:31 PM, Bill West <billwest48@...> wrote:


              I agree with your assessment, Zachary. I'm looking forward to the third book. There is
              so little that I like of the new crop of fantasy that I found this a ray of hope.

              Bill West




              --
              Alana Joli Abbott, Freelance Writer and Editor (http://www.virgilandbeatrice.com)
              Contributor to Haunted: 11 Tales of Ghostly Horror http://tinyurl.com/haunted-aja
              Author of Into the Reach and Departure http://tinyurl.com/aja-ebooks
              Columnist, "The Town with Five Main Streets" http://branford.patch.com/columns/the-town-with-five-main-streets

              --
              For updates on my writings, join my mailing list at http://groups.google.com/group/alanajoliabbottfans

            • John Davis
              I don t know whether her latest novel still counts as new , but for my money, Greer Gilman ranks up there with the great fantasy authors. (And speaking of,
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 15, 2012
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                I don't know whether her latest novel still counts as 'new', but for my money, Greer Gilman ranks up there with the great fantasy authors. (And speaking of, thanks to this list for pointing me in her direction a while back!)
                 
                John
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2012 9:55 PM
                Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Kingkiller Chronicles

                 

                Agreed about the meanness of the current crop. "Oft hope is born, when all is forlorn."

                - Z

                On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:31 PM, Bill West <billwest48@...> wrote:


                I agree with your assessment, Zachary. I'm looking forward to the third book. There is
                so little that I like of the new crop of fantasy that I found this a ray of hope.

                Bill West

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