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Re: [mythsoc] Baynes' Narnia

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  • LSolarion@aol.com
    In a message dated 09/05/2000 2:54:06 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ERATRIANO@aol.com writes:
    Message 1 of 25 , Sep 6, 2000
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      In a message dated 09/05/2000 2:54:06 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
      ERATRIANO@... writes:

      << the complete Chronicles are now
      available with Pauline Baynes' illustrations? I jsut saw an ad in the New
      York Times Book Review mag, and plan to check out www.narnia.com for prices
      and availability. >>

      There is a one-volume set of all seven, with colored illustrations, for
      $50.00, due this fall. They are also available singly, but I don't recall the
      price. I will try to get a more specific due date.
      Steve
    • Stolzi@aol.com
      In a message dated 09/06/2000 8:08:19 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Nobody knows what has happened to the listowner. There is a non-moderated e-groups list
      Message 2 of 25 , Sep 6, 2000
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        In a message dated 09/06/2000 8:08:19 PM Central Daylight Time,
        margdean@... writes:

        > Speaking of the MereLewis list, btw, what's happened to it?
        > There was a brief flurry of activity a few months back (after a
        > long hiatus), and then silence again.

        Nobody knows what has happened to the listowner. There is a non-moderated
        e-groups list around, put together by members who dug up a list of names, -
        not all of them of course, particularly the lurkers. Obviously, mine was
        one.

        Go here http://www.egroups.com/group/MereLewis2 for more.

        mary s
      • Wayne G. Hammond
        ... The colored pictures are also in a seven-volume paperback set (available separately and boxed) published by HarperCollins U.K. in 1998. ... the ... black
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 6, 2000
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          David Lenander wrote, in two messages:

          >The single volume
          >edition is the only one I've seen so far to feature colored editions of the 7
          >Chronicles.

          The colored pictures are also in a seven-volume paperback set (available
          separately and boxed) published by HarperCollins U.K. in 1998.

          >It's surprisingly easy to use and compact, all things considered.
          >Of course you lose the original design of the volumes, with the illustrations
          >laid out with some sense, not that this edition is as stupidly laid out as
          the
          >deluxe _Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe_, which included the original
          black and
          >white illustrations supplemented with new full-color plates. I wouldn't be
          >without this one, either, simply because I like the new Baynes illustrations.
          >However, the larger-format book destroys the original format, plus the glossy
          >paper stock resulted in the ink for the black and white illustrations (I
          think
          >blown-up from original size, but I'm working from memory here, and I might be
          >wrong about that) pooling on the page before drying and the details of
          Baynes'
          >lines are often obscured. Baynes had done the new plates on spec, and I'm
          happy
          >that the publisher published this edition, but it was done stupidly. And
          they
          >told her (reportedly) that they didn't want to do the rest of the
          Chronicles in
          >this format.

          I don't find anything particularly wrong with the layout of the deluxe LWW,
          and the poor reproduction quality of the black and white pictures didn't
          result from the glossy paper but from degradation of the art since the
          fifties, being reproduced over and over again, from reproduction to
          reproduction as the original art has been mostly dispersed. The black and
          whites are only good to poor in most other editions and printings of the
          Narnia books, following the first few printings of the original U.K.
          editions. (The American editions didn't include the full number of
          illustrations that were published in Britain.) The black and whites in the
          deluxe LWW in fact vary in size relative to the first edition, some
          pictures larger, some smaller.

          However, the glossy paper did give an unfortunate shine to the pictures,
          particularly the color ones. Pauline remarked on it, compared to the same
          color illustrations as reproduced much more nicely, on a beautiful
          off-white matte finish stock, for the Narnia Calendar that came out the
          same time as the original (1991) printing of the deluxe LWW. The exception
          in the book is the superb endpapers which show Narnia coming out of winter
          into spring.

          And yes, HarperCollins did decide not to publish any more of the Narnia
          books in the same deluxe format, which I regret very much.

          >My favorite editions are the Puffin paperbacks that Wayne
          >mentioned, which my former roommate brought back to me from the U.K. in the
          >mid-70s. These featured full-color covers by Baynes, along with a box.

          Two different boxes, in fact, at different times.

          >Even in
          >reduced format-size I still love these. Unfortunately, the paper stock is
          >yellowing and brittle, and I'm reluctant to let Claire read them except under
          >strict observation. I recommend the one-volume edition with the colored
          >illustrations as the best reading copy for children currently available
          here. I
          >think that the color does appeal to the children reading them for the first
          >time, even though in some ways I'm rather torn about the loss of the pristine
          >black-and-white illustrations.

          I would think the one-volume edition unwieldy for small hands, though of
          course sturdier for hard use. I wonder about the appeal of color, though.
          When black and white illustrations are well done, as by Baynes, or Shepard,
          for example, they have quite a lot of appeal without needing color, and I
          believe that children quite as well as, or even better than, adults pick up
          (subconsciously) on quality draftsmanship and design.

          >I visited the site Wayne mentioned, and while I didn't have time to really
          >explore it all, apparently the new paperback edition with Baynes color
          >jackets is already out in the U.S. The format is "digest-size," which means
          >they are larger than the Puffins I have, and may explain why the box is
          >clearly NOT the original art done on the Puffin edition, but simply some of
          >the cover art adapted for the box. (Alas). The format may be better for the
          >interior art than my old Puffins, though we shall see.... I worry that since
          >Pauline had designed wrap-around covers for the Puffins, the new ones may
          >dispense with the back illustration as the format is different.

          Actually only four of the seven volumes in the Puffin editions were
          complete wraparounds. The other three had solid-color spines interrupting
          the front and back cover art. Later Puffin had all solid-color spines.
          (Pauline did a number of wraparounds for Puffin. Her 1961 _Hobbit_ is
          probably the most famous. Her _Borrowers_ covers were good too, though
          there Puffin eventually dispensed with the back cover art in favor of
          blurbs etc.)

          >Interestingly, the page also shows the the other editions are being
          >re-released (as of next week?), with a new jacket on the deluxe LWW, for
          >instance, and an into by Doug Gresham to the one-volume (or was there an
          >intro in the original that I'm just forgetting?).

          There was an introduction in the original, but by Brian Sibley. I see, by
          the way, assuming that the graphic on the Narnia.com website is correct,
          that the British one-volume edition with the colored art now has a jacket
          like the American one-volume, based on Pauline's poster map of Narnia.
          Originally it was based on the winter-to-spring endpaper, nice but not as
          dramatic -- though more graphically interesting than the largely black and
          gold jacket on the other one-volume edition HarperCollins published in
          1998, for the adult market, with only black and white illustrations (or
          some of them).

          Wayne
        • Lisa Deutsch Harrigan
          Hey, does this mean we can change the Aslan award from the expensive library lion statues to a bunch of stuffed animals? Mythically yours, Lisa, you
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 6, 2000
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            Hey, does this mean we can change the "Aslan" award from the
            expensive library lion statues to a bunch of stuffed animals?
            <vbg>

            Mythically yours,

            Lisa, you know how the treasurer always has to keep an eye on the
            budget

            WendellWag@... wrote:

            > In a message dated 9/6/00 7:21:19 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            > Wayne.G.Hammond@... writes:
            >
            > << In 2002, the house will launch an all-new series of original
            > stories based on the world of Narnia, for ages four and up, at
            > which time the licensing effort will expand into toys, plush,
            > games and apparel." >>
            >
            > Oh, gag me with a spoon. Aslan is not a tame lion, but, hey,
            > now he's a squeezable toy for kids.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Margaret Dean
            ... Thanks, Mary! I went ahead and signed up. --Margaret Dean
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 7, 2000
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              Stolzi@... wrote:

              > In a message dated 09/06/2000 8:08:19 PM Central Daylight Time,
              > margdean@... writes:
              >
              > > Speaking of the MereLewis list, btw, what's happened to it?

              > Nobody knows what has happened to the listowner. There is a non-moderated
              > e-groups list around, put together by members who dug up a list of names, -
              > not all of them of course, particularly the lurkers. Obviously, mine was
              > one.
              >
              > Go here http://www.egroups.com/group/MereLewis2 for more.

              Thanks, Mary! I went ahead and signed up.


              --Margaret Dean
              <margdean@...>
            • ERATRIANO@aol.com
              All this information is leaving me lost at sea. So far I m gathering that the best purchase in terms of art quality and book quality is the all-in-one book?
              Message 6 of 25 , Sep 8, 2000
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                All this information is leaving me lost at sea. So far I'm gathering that
                the best purchase in terms of art quality and book quality is the all-in-one
                book? Or is there a boxed set that can really compete? I'd much prefer a
                boxed set.

                This one that Wayne mentioned: The most interesting repackaging is
                the series in seven paperbacks whose covers reproduce Pauline's cover art
                for the old Puffin Books edition, which was never sold in the U.S. -- Does
                that have nice illustrations throughout?

                I still haven't been to the site. Just haven't been online much this week.
                And if there's half the information there that there is here lately, I'll
                just get more confused. LOL. Need to touch them all to see them properly I
                guess.

                Lizzie
              • LSolarion@aol.com
                In a message dated 09/06/2000 4:21:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time, Wayne.G.Hammond@williams.edu writes:
                Message 7 of 25 , Sep 9, 2000
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                  In a message dated 09/06/2000 4:21:22 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
                  Wayne.G.Hammond@... writes:

                  << In 2002, the house will launch an all-new
                  series of original stories based on the world of Narnia, for ages four and
                  up, at which time the licensing effort will expand into toys, plush, games
                  and apparel."
                  >>

                  In India, Hindus have worshipped the cow for centuries.
                  In America, we have a sacred cow as well; it's called the Cash Cow. The calf
                  is always golden in the land of the free, where the unofficial state religion
                  is Mammon-worship. Nothing else is sacred. The only value anything has is its
                  money-making potential. Oh say can you see all the i-dol-a-try?

                  Sorry...letting my intense disgust run away with me.
                • LSolarion@aol.com
                  In a message dated 09/06/2000 6:08:08 PM Pacific Daylight Time, margdean@erols.com writes:
                  Message 8 of 25 , Sep 9, 2000
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                    In a message dated 09/06/2000 6:08:08 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                    margdean@... writes:

                    << Speaking of the MereLewis list, btw, what's happened to it?
                    There was a brief flurry of activity a few months back (after a
                    long hiatus), and then silence again. >>

                    It has been resurrected under new ownership; same old wonderful discussion,
                    though. You can reach it at:

                    MereLewis2-owner@egroups.com

                    Steve
                  • Wayne G. Hammond
                    ... religion ... its ... In fact, HarperCollins is a multinational corporation with its main offices in the U.K., and C.S. Lewis Pte Ltd. is also based outside
                    Message 9 of 25 , Sep 9, 2000
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                      ><< In 2002, the house will launch an all-new
                      > series of original stories based on the world of Narnia, for ages four and
                      > up, at which time the licensing effort will expand into toys, plush, games
                      > and apparel."
                      > >>
                      >
                      >In India, Hindus have worshipped the cow for centuries.
                      >In America, we have a sacred cow as well; it's called the Cash Cow. The calf
                      >is always golden in the land of the free, where the unofficial state
                      religion
                      >is Mammon-worship. Nothing else is sacred. The only value anything has is
                      its
                      >money-making potential. Oh say can you see all the i-dol-a-try?

                      In fact, HarperCollins is a multinational corporation with its main offices
                      in the U.K., and C.S. Lewis Pte Ltd. is also based outside the U.S.

                      Wayne Hammond
                    • Stolzi@aol.com
                      In a message dated 09/09/2000 1:22:16 PM Central Daylight Time, ... MereLewis is back at least for now, non-moderated. The ML2 crowd is trying to move the
                      Message 10 of 25 , Sep 9, 2000
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                        In a message dated 09/09/2000 1:22:16 PM Central Daylight Time,
                        LSolarion@... writes:

                        > It has been resurrected under new ownership; same old wonderful discussion,
                        > though. You can reach it at:
                        >
                        > MereLewis2-owner@egroups.com
                        >

                        MereLewis is back at least for now, non-moderated. The ML2 crowd is trying
                        to move the discussion back to the original list. But will probably hold ML2
                        in reserve for future problems that may occur.

                        Mary S
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