Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] Re: Ballet of "The Princess and the Goblin"

Expand Messages
  • Mike Foster
    John, You were thinking of Tanya Tucker, who recorded “Would You Lay With Me In A Field Of Stone,” to which Glen Campbell replied, “Why, yes, I would.”
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 15, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      John,
      You were thinking of Tanya Tucker, who recorded “Would You Lay With Me In A Field Of Stone,” to which Glen Campbell replied, “Why, yes, I would.”
       
      I smiled out loud at the notion of a ballet with stomp-able goblin feet.
       
      Cheers,
      Mike
       
      Sent: Wednesday, February 15, 2012 12:20 AM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Ballet of "The Princess and the Goblin"
       
       

      Following this link, and belatedly checking out the one you'd posted previously, i thought it a fascinating account of how they'd tried to adapt a work from one genre (Victorian children's fantasy) to another (modern ballet). The explanations for what they changed, and why, and what they took pains to keep, and why, were really interesting -- to me, at least (e.g., shifting the main character from a young girl to a young adult because a teen dancer cdn't execute all the difficult maneuvers required by the part). Although I have to admit I'd thought Twyla Tharp was a country singer, not a distinguished dancer and choreographer, and was thrown by the statement that it was set to music by Franz Schubert, which I misread as their saying Schubert had set MacDonald's piece to music (which chronologically didn't make sense). Finally realized they were just adapting music by Schubert as suitable for the era they wanted to evoke.

      Odd that the article writer in both cases didn't seem to recognize the motif of the main character's younger sibling(s) stolen away by the goblins as coming from "Goblin Market" -- I wd have thought that's a far more well known piece than the MacDonald.

      Did love the idea of doing a ballet in which all the villains have tender, stomp-able feet.

      Thanks for posting the links, wh. I'd otherwise never have come across

      --John R.

      On Feb 13, 2012, at 1:55 PM, mailto:davise%40cs.nyu.edu wrote:

      >
      Since my earlier post created such a stir here, I figured I should post a link to the review in the NY Times:
      >
      >
      href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/13/arts/dance/twyla-tharps-the-princess-and-the-goblin.html">http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/13/arts/dance/twyla-tharps-the-princess-and-the-goblin.html
      >
      > --- In
      href="mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com">mailto:mythsoc%40yahoogroups.com, davise@... wrote:
      >> Twyla Tharp's new full-length ballet based on
      George MacDonald's "The Princess and the Goblin" will have its premiere performance Feb. 10-19 by the Atlanta ballet.
      >>
      >>
      href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/05/arts/dance/twyla-tharp-creates-the-princess-and-the-goblin-ballet.html">http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/05/arts/dance/twyla-tharp-creates-the-princess-and-the-goblin-ballet.html
      >

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.