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Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion

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  • Sophie Masson
    No reason why you can t learn times tables as well--and why is maths considered higher anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like the rest of
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 1, 2000
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      No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
      considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
      the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too.
      Sophie
      Author site:
      http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

      -----Original Message-----
      From: ERATRIANO@... <ERATRIANO@...>
      To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
      Date: Friday, 1 September 2000 9:11
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


      >
      >In a message dated 08/31/2000 5:51:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      >smasson@... writes:
      >
      ><< so now perhaps fantasy, so long an
      > undercurrent, is coming up to reinvigorate a society which has exhausted
      > itself through modernism and is looking for the green source again.. >>
      >
      >I think that's only true to some extent. I think there is also the very
      >great danger of fantasy as the easy route, the mind candy. Fantasy can
      >illuminate a world that already has structure and history, but fantasy
      >without connections to history and culture, or fantasy in place of critical
      >thinking, I think that's not a road to a good place. Speaking as one who
      >regrets not taking higher math and who has trouble learning any facts not
      >cloaked in colorful narrative. Story is fun, stories are fun to discuss;
      but
      >I think we should all consider that children more easily memorize all the
      >attacks, names and interactions of the 150+ Pokemon than learn their times
      >tables. We need to learn our times tables.
      >
      >Lizzie
      >
      >
      >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      >
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, smasson@northnet.com.au writes:
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 1, 2000
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        In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        smasson@... writes:

        << No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
        considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
        the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too. >>

        Some of us *are* mathematicians.
      • Solomon Deems
        Well, I feel that the most efficient way of learning something is to be properly motivated. The approach of turning learning into a game is applied to young
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 2, 2000
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          Well, I feel that the most efficient way of learning something is to be
          properly motivated. The approach of turning learning into a game is applied
          to young children with flashcards and "game shows" in school. Looking back
          on my high school days, I think it worked pretty well. I don't think we
          should place more emphasis on the learning of math rather than more
          imaginative areas such as fantasy, I think they must be combined. I happen
          to be excellent at math (which I do not at all consider to be unimaginative
          by the way), only because I like it so much. Geometry came easily to me, I
          was a natural at it. Algebra was not quite as easy for me, but I loved it
          as well. Why? Because I looked further than the times tables, I was
          looking not at math but at the most basic language of reality, because I was
          discovering a perfect science that has always been there, because I was
          gaining new insight into problem solving and common sense and discovering
          the laws that govern the universe.

          I think that strong math skills elevate one's ability to comprehend advanced
          concepts, as well as creating a more complex general thinking structure, a
          sort of unconscious identification between our common knowledge and
          unconscious knowledge. By learning complex elements of math, it is almost
          as if you are building default thought patterns and plotting paths for
          problem solving in a way we could not understand. We already know math, we
          do nightmarishly complicated calculus every time we catch a baseball, jog,
          get out of bed...

          I think the secret to getting our children to focuss on math is not to
          force memorization, but to motivate their imaginations to explore the
          universe and it's mysteries, to teach them how to look at life like an
          adventure, to give them a thirst for the heart's desire, for it is in pusuit
          of the heart's desire that one is lead to the beauty in life. A person who
          enjoys life's adventure willingly will explore all that s/he finds to be
          stimulating and has only to see what makes anything interesting. For this
          one must naturally look for what is stimulating in all that surrounds, and
          that is why we have fantasy. Among other things, it shows us how to look at
          the wold from the heart, and it is from the heart- only- that we might see
          what the world trully has to offer.

          And then one day I began reading about chaos theory and I was hopelessly
          obsessed....

          Solomon
          ---Original Message-----
          From: WendellWag@... <WendellWag@...>
          To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
          Date: Friday, September 01, 2000 10:28 PM
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


          >
          >In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          >smasson@... writes:
          >
          ><< No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
          > considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
          > the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too. >>
          >
          >Some of us *are* mathematicians.
          >
          >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          >
        • Sophie Masson
          Exactly. Mathematicians past and present--where would we be without Lewis Carroll? Sophie Author site: http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm ...
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 2, 2000
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            Exactly. Mathematicians past and present--where would we be without Lewis
            Carroll?
            Sophie
            Author site:
            http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

            -----Original Message-----
            From: WendellWag@... <WendellWag@...>
            To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
            Date: Saturday, 2 September 2000 13:25
            Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


            >
            >In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            >smasson@... writes:
            >
            ><< No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
            > considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
            > the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too. >>
            >
            >Some of us *are* mathematicians.
            >
            >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            >
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