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Re: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales

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  • John Rateliff
    salright. The key is just to remember that it rhymes with Lord Insany , his nickname (unknown to himself, of course) during the brief time he was a visiting
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 13, 2011
      'salright. The key is just to remember that it rhymes with "Lord Insany", his nickname (unknown to himself, of course) during the brief time he was a visiting lecturer at the Univ. of Athens.
         Another key Dunsany piece re. Xianity is THE BLESSINGS OF PAN, in which a village vicar in Kent struggles against a local resurgence of paganism. Not his best novel, but a fairly devastating critique.
         Where Dunsany really shines on this topic, I think, is that he understands the mind-set behind idolatry better than any other author I know (certainly better than the authors of the latter parts of the Old Testament, who are utterly baffled why anyone shd want to do such a thing). And of course he was the first to create his own pantheon of fantasy gods: I'd argue his example inspired both Tolkien's Valar and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos.

         All this is straying a bit from the original 'Xian Fairy Tale' topic, but if we're talking Xian fantasy in general I'd also recommend Boyer & Zahorski's VISIONS OF WONDER, part of a series of interesting anthologies they put out in the late seventies and early eighties (THE FANTASTIC IMAGINATION, THE FANTASTIC IMAGINATION II, THE PHOENIX TREE, & best of all FANTASISTS ON FANTASY, wh. includes an essay apiece by MacD and GKC that shd be relevant).

      --John R.

      On Jun 13, 2011, at 1:45 AM, John Davis wrote:

      Speaking of him, but apparently unable to spell his name first thing in the morning. Apologies! John
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: John Davis
      Sent: Monday, June 13, 2011 9:42 AM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales

      Speaking of Dunsanay, The King of Elfland's Daughter is both a fairy tale (of sorts), and (in part) an account of Christianity coming into conflict with faery.
       
      John
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2011 2:00 AM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales

      Well, I'd say the place to start would be George MacDonald, especially his short fairy-tales. MacD was both a devout (though highly unorthodox) Xian and a ground-breaking writer of fairy-tales, so there'll be plenty to read and discuss.

      For contrast, they might want to compare a story or two by Dunsany, who makes up his own gods (an entirely different way of getting "religion" into fairy-tales).

      Yet another differing viewpoint might be Kenneth Morris, whose work is suffused with religiosity but rarely overtly religious; a great exception is "The Saint and the Forest God" (in THE SECRET MOUNTAIN and in Doug Anderson's collection THE DRAGON PATH).

      --John R.

      On Jun 10, 2011, at 2:33 PM, hughhdavis@... wrote:
      > A student has asked me about a possible independent study next year looking at religion in fairy tales. As I collect potential materials, I thought I would turn to the collective wisdom of this group for suggestions. Cursory searches turn up many "religion is just a fairy tale"-type blogs.
      > 
      > Thanks in advance, 
      > Hugh Davis




    • Kevin Bowring
      Excuse me if someone already mentioned this, but G. Ronald Murphy s The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms Magic Fairy Tales
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 14, 2011
        Excuse me if someone already mentioned this, but G. Ronald Murphy's "The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales" would seem to be a reasonable place to start.  It won a Mythsoc award.  Here's the Amazon link for more info:
        http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195136071/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&m=A7MGM2FC6ASLQ

        Kevin



        --- On Fri, 6/10/11, hughhdavis@... <hughhdavis@...> wrote:

        From: hughhdavis@... <hughhdavis@...>
        Subject: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, June 10, 2011, 5:33 PM

         

        A student has asked me about a possible independent study next year looking at religion in fairy tales. As I collect potential materials, I thought I would turn to the collective wisdom of this group for suggestions. Cursory searches turn up many "religion is just a fairy tale"-type blogs.

        Thanks in advance,
        Hugh Davis

      • bernip
        He is also scholar GOH next summer at the Mythcon in Berkeley. Berni Phillips Bratman _____ From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 14, 2011
          He is also scholar GOH next summer at the Mythcon in Berkeley.
           
          Berni Phillips Bratman
           


          From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kevin Bowring
          Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 7:18 PM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales

          Excuse me if someone already mentioned this, but G. Ronald Murphy's "The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales" would seem to be a reasonable place to start.  It won a Mythsoc award.  Here's the Amazon link for more info:
          http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195136071/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&m=A7MGM2FC6ASLQ

          Kevin



          --- On Fri, 6/10/11, hughhdavis@... <hughhdavis@...> wrote:

          From: hughhdavis@... <hughhdavis@...>
          Subject: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, June 10, 2011, 5:33 PM

           

          A student has asked me about a possible independent study next year looking at religion in fairy tales. As I collect potential materials, I thought I would turn to the collective wisdom of this group for suggestions. Cursory searches turn up many "religion is just a fairy tale"-type blogs.

          Thanks in advance,
          Hugh Davis

        • dale nelson
          This was my review of Murphy s book when it first came out, FWIW. http://www.touchstonemag.com/archives/print.php?id=15-05-047-b Dale Nelson
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 15, 2011
            This was my review of Murphy's book when it first came out, FWIW.

            http://www.touchstonemag.com/archives/print.php?id=15-05-047-b

            Dale Nelson



            From: Kevin Bowring <allegoresis@...>
            To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, June 14, 2011 9:18:01 PM
            Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales

             

            Excuse me if someone already mentioned this, but G. Ronald Murphy's "The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales" would seem to be a reasonable place to start.  It won a Mythsoc award.  Here's the Amazon link for more info:
            http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195136071/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?ie=UTF8&m=A7MGM2FC6ASLQ

            Kevin



            --- On Fri, 6/10/11, hughhdavis@... <hughhdavis@...> wrote:

            From: hughhdavis@... <hughhdavis@...>
            Subject: [mythsoc] Fairy Tales
            To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, June 10, 2011, 5:33 PM

             

            A student has asked me about a possible independent study next year looking at religion in fairy tales. As I collect potential materials, I thought I would turn to the collective wisdom of this group for suggestions. Cursory searches turn up many "religion is just a fairy tale"-type blogs.

            Thanks in advance,
            Hugh Davis

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