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Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion

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  • Sophie Masson
    I think this is all true. In the last year or so I ve been asked more and more to go into schools to talk about myth,legend, and traditional stories..more and
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 31, 2000
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      I think this is all true. In the last year or so I've been asked more and
      more to go into schools to talk about myth,legend, and traditional
      stories..more and more people are finding meaning again in these things, and
      much of this has been achieved through popular culture. Just as in the 12th
      century, the medieval romance started through the stories of the 'common
      people' and spread into the courts, so now perhaps fantasy, so long an
      undercurrent, is coming up to reinvigorate a society which has exhausted
      itself through modernism and is looking for the green source again..
      Sophie
      Author site:
      http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Solomon <Deemstar@...>
      To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
      Date: Friday, 1 September 2000 3:08
      Subject: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


      >
      >Greetings,
      >
      >I have a general statement and inquiry.
      >
      >I believe we are on the eve of an explosion in popularity for
      >fantasy. Although The fantasy television shows that have all popped
      >up in the past several years are not exactly what one might call...
      >uh... er, a prime example of the genre's potential, they are, without
      >a doubt, building a new audience for fantasy. Although they have
      >much to be desired, it is a baby step in a positive direction.
      >Through them, people are getting acustomed to topics such as magic,
      >mythic creatures, fantastic settings, adventure and heroism. With
      >time they may also follow this path further, seeking more depth,
      >insight into life, and really discovering the capabilities of the
      >imagination.
      >
      >
      >Also, popular cinema has a large influence on society. I have heard
      >very few negative expectations from the LOTR movie, yet even if it
      >were half as good as I expect it to be, it would still probably be a
      >huge mone maker in the box office. Surely, if nothing else for the
      >pursuit of money, this could start a trend in cinema. I have heard
      >of a Harry Potter movie and a D&D movie, both already having large
      >fan bases.
      >
      >Between the two, there is a very good chance of fantasy gaining
      >attention never really seen before in the modern age. This would
      >likely spark a ressurgance of interest in the obviouss classic
      >fantasy creations and mythology. I can easily see many movies of
      >classic myths of the Nordic and Celtic as well as more of Greek. Can
      >you imagine how this might effect society? Concider all of the
      >positive influences this genre has on ones view of and appraoch to
      >life. I personally believe that fantasy changes the way one thinks,
      >breaking restrictions one may have on thought. The impossible
      >becomes possible, life is a great adventure, it is as if enjoying
      >fantasy on a regular basis helps one to view the world as being full
      >of endless possibilities, and therefore always to look for new ones.
      >
      >I can see many positive influences this trend would have on society,
      >not to mention all of the new quality works that would come out of
      >such a fantasy revolution.
      >
      >What do you think about this?
      >
      >Solomon
      >
      >
      >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      >
    • ERATRIANO@aol.com
      In a message dated 08/31/2000 5:51:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, smasson@northnet.com.au writes:
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 31, 2000
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        In a message dated 08/31/2000 5:51:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        smasson@... writes:

        << so now perhaps fantasy, so long an
        undercurrent, is coming up to reinvigorate a society which has exhausted
        itself through modernism and is looking for the green source again.. >>

        I think that's only true to some extent. I think there is also the very
        great danger of fantasy as the easy route, the mind candy. Fantasy can
        illuminate a world that already has structure and history, but fantasy
        without connections to history and culture, or fantasy in place of critical
        thinking, I think that's not a road to a good place. Speaking as one who
        regrets not taking higher math and who has trouble learning any facts not
        cloaked in colorful narrative. Story is fun, stories are fun to discuss; but
        I think we should all consider that children more easily memorize all the
        attacks, names and interactions of the 150+ Pokemon than learn their times
        tables. We need to learn our times tables.

        Lizzie
      • Sophie Masson
        No reason why you can t learn times tables as well--and why is maths considered higher anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like the rest of
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 1 8:11 PM
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          No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
          considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
          the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too.
          Sophie
          Author site:
          http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

          -----Original Message-----
          From: ERATRIANO@... <ERATRIANO@...>
          To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
          Date: Friday, 1 September 2000 9:11
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


          >
          >In a message dated 08/31/2000 5:51:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          >smasson@... writes:
          >
          ><< so now perhaps fantasy, so long an
          > undercurrent, is coming up to reinvigorate a society which has exhausted
          > itself through modernism and is looking for the green source again.. >>
          >
          >I think that's only true to some extent. I think there is also the very
          >great danger of fantasy as the easy route, the mind candy. Fantasy can
          >illuminate a world that already has structure and history, but fantasy
          >without connections to history and culture, or fantasy in place of critical
          >thinking, I think that's not a road to a good place. Speaking as one who
          >regrets not taking higher math and who has trouble learning any facts not
          >cloaked in colorful narrative. Story is fun, stories are fun to discuss;
          but
          >I think we should all consider that children more easily memorize all the
          >attacks, names and interactions of the 150+ Pokemon than learn their times
          >tables. We need to learn our times tables.
          >
          >Lizzie
          >
          >
          >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          >
        • WendellWag@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, smasson@northnet.com.au writes:
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 1 8:28 PM
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            In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            smasson@... writes:

            << No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
            considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
            the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too. >>

            Some of us *are* mathematicians.
          • Solomon Deems
            Well, I feel that the most efficient way of learning something is to be properly motivated. The approach of turning learning into a game is applied to young
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 2 8:24 AM
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              Well, I feel that the most efficient way of learning something is to be
              properly motivated. The approach of turning learning into a game is applied
              to young children with flashcards and "game shows" in school. Looking back
              on my high school days, I think it worked pretty well. I don't think we
              should place more emphasis on the learning of math rather than more
              imaginative areas such as fantasy, I think they must be combined. I happen
              to be excellent at math (which I do not at all consider to be unimaginative
              by the way), only because I like it so much. Geometry came easily to me, I
              was a natural at it. Algebra was not quite as easy for me, but I loved it
              as well. Why? Because I looked further than the times tables, I was
              looking not at math but at the most basic language of reality, because I was
              discovering a perfect science that has always been there, because I was
              gaining new insight into problem solving and common sense and discovering
              the laws that govern the universe.

              I think that strong math skills elevate one's ability to comprehend advanced
              concepts, as well as creating a more complex general thinking structure, a
              sort of unconscious identification between our common knowledge and
              unconscious knowledge. By learning complex elements of math, it is almost
              as if you are building default thought patterns and plotting paths for
              problem solving in a way we could not understand. We already know math, we
              do nightmarishly complicated calculus every time we catch a baseball, jog,
              get out of bed...

              I think the secret to getting our children to focuss on math is not to
              force memorization, but to motivate their imaginations to explore the
              universe and it's mysteries, to teach them how to look at life like an
              adventure, to give them a thirst for the heart's desire, for it is in pusuit
              of the heart's desire that one is lead to the beauty in life. A person who
              enjoys life's adventure willingly will explore all that s/he finds to be
              stimulating and has only to see what makes anything interesting. For this
              one must naturally look for what is stimulating in all that surrounds, and
              that is why we have fantasy. Among other things, it shows us how to look at
              the wold from the heart, and it is from the heart- only- that we might see
              what the world trully has to offer.

              And then one day I began reading about chaos theory and I was hopelessly
              obsessed....

              Solomon
              ---Original Message-----
              From: WendellWag@... <WendellWag@...>
              To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
              Date: Friday, September 01, 2000 10:28 PM
              Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


              >
              >In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
              >smasson@... writes:
              >
              ><< No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
              > considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
              > the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too. >>
              >
              >Some of us *are* mathematicians.
              >
              >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              >
            • Sophie Masson
              Exactly. Mathematicians past and present--where would we be without Lewis Carroll? Sophie Author site: http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm ...
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 2 11:18 PM
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                Exactly. Mathematicians past and present--where would we be without Lewis
                Carroll?
                Sophie
                Author site:
                http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

                -----Original Message-----
                From: WendellWag@... <WendellWag@...>
                To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
                Date: Saturday, 2 September 2000 13:25
                Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fantasy Explosion


                >
                >In a message dated 9/1/00 11:17:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                >smasson@... writes:
                >
                ><< No reason why you can't learn times tables as well--and why is maths
                > considered 'higher' anyway?in my experience, mathematicians are just like
                > the rest of us--and many of them live in a fantasy world, too. >>
                >
                >Some of us *are* mathematicians.
                >
                >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                >
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