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Re: [mythsoc] My message

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  • Matthew Winslow
    ... I d say probably Lewis because of his popularity across religious denominations. I know a lot of people who would never touch mainstream fantasy or science
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 31 11:30 AM
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      Gwenyth Hood [hood@...] wrote:
      > That's an interesting point, Joe, on Lewis versus Miller. On the other hand,
      > while it might be true that more critics praise _Canticle_, which of the two
      > authors, do you suppose, is actually read by more readers?

      I'd say probably Lewis because of his popularity across religious
      denominations. I know a lot of people who would never touch mainstream fantasy
      or science fiction who have read the Space Trilogy because of its author.
      Miller, who didn't write much (was there any other book aside from the
      posthumous St Leibowitz?), didn't have that sort of audience draw.

      In short, I think that this might be an apples and oranges comparison.

      --
      Matthew Winslow mwinslow@... http://x-real.firinn.org/
      "Beer is proof that God love us and wants us to be happy."
      --Benjamin Franklin
      Currently reading: The Medieval Garden by Sylvia Landsberg
    • Gwenyth Hood
      That s an interesting point, Joe, on Lewis versus Miller. On the other hand, while it might be true that more critics praise _Canticle_, which of the two
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 31 12:31 PM
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        That's an interesting point, Joe, on Lewis versus Miller. On the other hand,
        while it might be true that more critics praise _Canticle_, which of the two
        authors, do you suppose, is actually read by more readers?

        Oh, I have no statistics, I'm just speculating.

        Gwenyth Hood

        Joe Christopher wrote:

        >
        > Oops. I meant to print out for myself my comments about Miller and Lewis to
        > think about, and I gather I hit the send message by mistake.
        >
        > What was complicating my reaction is that Lewis was giving basically his
        > side of each argument, but he assumed that his readers had read Shaw and
        > Wells, etc., also, and they knew the other side. And I think, in the
        > context of his writing, this may be effective--but it has produced a
        > situation in which number of readers have read only one side (Lewis's side)
        > and think he has won the argument. It's never that simple in real life.
        >
        > But I'm sorry I accidentally sent the earlier message.
        >
        > --Joe
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      • WendellWag@aol.com
        In a message dated 8/31/00 2:32:31 PM Eastern Daylight Time, mwinslow@firinn.org writes:
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 1, 2000
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          In a message dated 8/31/00 2:32:31 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          mwinslow@... writes:

          << Miller, who didn't write much (was there any other book aside from the
          posthumous St Leibowitz?), didn't have that sort of audience draw. >>

          Walter Miller's only novels were _A Canticle for Leibowitz_ and _Saint
          Leibowitz and the Wild Horse Woman_. He published some short stories which
          were collected in some now out-of-print anthologies. He changed
          philosophically toward the end of his life. See his introduction to the
          anthology _Beyond Armageddon: Survivors of the Megawar_.

          Wendell Wagner
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