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Re: [mythsoc] Copyright Loremasters?

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  • Jason Fisher
    ... No, David, that s not quite what I meant. Plenty of derivative works might be well-constructed and well-written. I don t know because I don t read them.
    Message 1 of 49 , May 5 9:16 AM
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      > You're now in the position of having said you don't grasp a whole class
      > of works, when what you meant was that you don't like the ones you
      > don't think are any good.
       
      No, David, that's not quite what I meant. Plenty of derivative works might be well-constructed and well-written. I don't know because I don't read them. Once in a while, I have read a work like this which I really like. Two examples that come to mind: John Gardner's Grendel, retelling Beowulf from Grendel's point of view; and David Maine's The Preservationist, an irreverant take on the Biblical story of Noah. It's that I don't usually grasp the point or the goal or the motive. I'm not saying something as simple as "I don't get what I don't like" or "I don't like what I think is no good", though those might also be true statements. Precisely because I don't read much of this kind of stuff, I don't think I'd ever just dismiss it all as "no good". Unless perhaps out of colloquial carelessness -- which you are welcome to point out, if or when I do it. In my previous message, "I don't care for" it meant "I have no interest in" it, not "I have read it and judge it no good". I have no idea whether or which such works are any good (whatever we might mean by "good"); what I meant to convey was that I don't usually grasp why anyone would do it. But there are exceptions.
       
      Perhaps I wasn't very clear. I don't look down on such stuff as bad; I am merely puzzled by it and (with rare exceptions) have little or no interest in it. Normally the works I am willing to give a chance and might even like are the ones where the source material is centuries old (like the two examples above).
       
      Best,
      Jason
       
      PS. Good point about Shakespeare's plot-pilfering. Isn't it only The Temptest, and maybe A Misdummer Night's Dream, that are thought to be totally original, out of close to forty plays? :)
    • John Rateliff
      Yes, as David says, it s a great story. The closing sentence is particularly memorable -- but there s no way to share it with anyone without spoiling the
      Message 49 of 49 , May 10 3:44 PM
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        Yes, as David says, it's a great story. The closing sentence is particularly memorable -- but there's no way to share it with anyone without spoiling the story. It's not that often I call something a masterpiece, but "The Ugly Chickens" is one.
           --John R.



        On May 9, 2011, at 8:23 AM, Mem Morman wrote:
        I found the Walpole story on the web and read it this morning.  It made my day.  You go read it too.
        mem



        -- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Bratman <dbratman@...> wrote:
        > His most ingenious story ever was called "The Ugly Chickens". It starts with an ornithologist idly leafing through a book of extinct birds while riding a bus, and the old lady sitting next to him stops him when he gets to the dodo and says, "I haven't seen any of those ugly chickens in a long time." But the dodo has been extinct for centuries; how could she possibly ever have seen any? Well, it turns out that the dodo hadn't gone extinct; it has a hidden history that he spends the story uncovering, and it turns out that ... oh, read it. Great story.


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