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Re: Inklings in Courses (was CSL BIble)

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  • lynnmaudlin
    Diana Glyer doesn t usually take part on this list but she has taught Inklings courses as well as dedicated JRRT and CSL courses. I would think her book, The
    Message 1 of 49 , Apr 21, 2011
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      Diana Glyer doesn't usually take part on this list but she has taught Inklings courses as well as dedicated JRRT and CSL courses. I would think her book, The Company They Keep, might be an interesting tool in the case of an Inklings course...

      -- Lynn --


      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Swain" <theswain@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:30 -0700, "dale nelson"
      > <extollager2006@...> wrote:
      >
      > >>Larry, Till We Have Faces always goes over well in my British
      > Novel course. The other authors have been Brontë's Jane Eyre,
      > Dickens (Bleak House or Our Mutual Friend), perhaps Gaskell
      > (Wives and Daughters), Conrad (The Secret Agent), etc. The
      > authors are all interested in families -- or the absence
      > thereof. TWHF works well as a novel about a family (as Lewis
      > intended).<<
      >
      > Thanks for all the responses! I've taught various Lewis and Tolkien
      > texts, more Tolkien than other though. I've taught "Tolkien and LoTR:
      > Influences and Influence" which I confess I used as a tie in to Medieval
      > literature with brief forays into Classical literature (Odyssey Bk XI,
      > Aeneid Book 6, some Hesiod), and two or three dashes of examining
      > modern, post-Tolkien, Tolkien-inspired Medievalisms. Then there was the
      > Understanding Literature course which I cheated and made all about Epic
      > literature reading the Odyssey, Aeneid, Beowulf, selections of Dante and
      > Milton, and the last half of the class was LoTR. Another version of the
      > Understanding Literature course was on the themes of journey in which
      > The Hobbit and Out of the Silent Planet played a part. This last fall I
      > taught a course called British and World Prose, subtitled Old Tales
      > Retold: the first half of the semester was the three I mentioned:
      > Hobbit, Till We Have Faces, and Once and Future King.
      >
      > I haven't done a course just on "Inklings" or "Inklings and Friends (so
      > I could include Sayers and/or Chesterton among others).
      >
      > I have also used Lewis and Tolkien's scholarship: again here Tolkien
      > more than Lewis. I routinely use Tolkien's translations of Pearl, Sir
      > Gawain, and Sir Orfeo; and I routinely use Tolkien's translation of
      > Exodus. I'd love to use his Beowulf but must content myself with
      > selections from Monsters and the Critics. From Lewis the two works that
      > continue to stand the test of time are Discarded Image and Allegory of
      > Love. While the latter has been bypassed in many ways, it remains a
      > good introduction to Romance lit.
      >
      > While I've read most of Williams, I've yet to include him in a course.
      > And I've read very little Barfield. I don't teach the period, but
      > Warney's books I've always found a very nice read and have recommended
      > them a few times to the curious.
      >
      > Larry Swain
      > ____________________________________________________________
      >
      > --
      > http://www.fastmail.fm - mmm... Fastmail...
      >
    • lynnmaudlin
      Diana Glyer doesn t usually take part on this list but she has taught Inklings courses as well as dedicated JRRT and CSL courses. I would think her book, The
      Message 49 of 49 , Apr 21, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Diana Glyer doesn't usually take part on this list but she has taught Inklings courses as well as dedicated JRRT and CSL courses. I would think her book, The Company They Keep, might be an interesting tool in the case of an Inklings course...

        -- Lynn --


        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Larry Swain" <theswain@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:30 -0700, "dale nelson"
        > <extollager2006@...> wrote:
        >
        > >>Larry, Till We Have Faces always goes over well in my British
        > Novel course. The other authors have been Brontë's Jane Eyre,
        > Dickens (Bleak House or Our Mutual Friend), perhaps Gaskell
        > (Wives and Daughters), Conrad (The Secret Agent), etc. The
        > authors are all interested in families -- or the absence
        > thereof. TWHF works well as a novel about a family (as Lewis
        > intended).<<
        >
        > Thanks for all the responses! I've taught various Lewis and Tolkien
        > texts, more Tolkien than other though. I've taught "Tolkien and LoTR:
        > Influences and Influence" which I confess I used as a tie in to Medieval
        > literature with brief forays into Classical literature (Odyssey Bk XI,
        > Aeneid Book 6, some Hesiod), and two or three dashes of examining
        > modern, post-Tolkien, Tolkien-inspired Medievalisms. Then there was the
        > Understanding Literature course which I cheated and made all about Epic
        > literature reading the Odyssey, Aeneid, Beowulf, selections of Dante and
        > Milton, and the last half of the class was LoTR. Another version of the
        > Understanding Literature course was on the themes of journey in which
        > The Hobbit and Out of the Silent Planet played a part. This last fall I
        > taught a course called British and World Prose, subtitled Old Tales
        > Retold: the first half of the semester was the three I mentioned:
        > Hobbit, Till We Have Faces, and Once and Future King.
        >
        > I haven't done a course just on "Inklings" or "Inklings and Friends (so
        > I could include Sayers and/or Chesterton among others).
        >
        > I have also used Lewis and Tolkien's scholarship: again here Tolkien
        > more than Lewis. I routinely use Tolkien's translations of Pearl, Sir
        > Gawain, and Sir Orfeo; and I routinely use Tolkien's translation of
        > Exodus. I'd love to use his Beowulf but must content myself with
        > selections from Monsters and the Critics. From Lewis the two works that
        > continue to stand the test of time are Discarded Image and Allegory of
        > Love. While the latter has been bypassed in many ways, it remains a
        > good introduction to Romance lit.
        >
        > While I've read most of Williams, I've yet to include him in a course.
        > And I've read very little Barfield. I don't teach the period, but
        > Warney's books I've always found a very nice read and have recommended
        > them a few times to the curious.
        >
        > Larry Swain
        > ____________________________________________________________
        >
        > --
        > http://www.fastmail.fm - mmm... Fastmail...
        >
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