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Re: [mythsoc] Diana Wynne Jones

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  • Lisa Padol
    I can t decide which of Cart and Cwidder or The Spellcoats is my favorite. I remember laughing until my sides hurt when reading some of her other books. And,
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 26, 2011
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      I can't decide which of Cart and Cwidder or The Spellcoats is my favorite. I remember laughing until my sides hurt when reading some of her other books.

      And, while Drowned Ammet wasn't my absolute favorite, it was a good answer to a comment a friend of mine made years ago. He was tired of fantasy in which everyone was a noble, fighter, mage, or priest, and no one seemed to be doing the work that would have been necessary to feed and clothe all of them. There's a certain blanket in Drowned Ammet that shows that Jones didn't make that mistake. I mean, okay, a lot of things show it, but that's the one I remember best.

      -Lisa Padol
    • bernip
      It sounds like someone (who is not me, as I m not that conversant with her work) should write up an article for Mythprint and send it to Jason. Any takers?
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 27, 2011
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        It sounds like someone (who is not me, as I'm not that conversant with her
        work) should write up an article for Mythprint and send it to Jason. Any
        takers? I'll bet a lot of us would like to read it.

        Berni


        -----Original Message-----
        From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Lisa Padol
        Sent: Saturday, March 26, 2011 11:13 PM
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Diana Wynne Jones

        I can't decide which of Cart and Cwidder or The Spellcoats is my favorite. I
        remember laughing until my sides hurt when reading some of her other books.

        And, while Drowned Ammet wasn't my absolute favorite, it was a good answer
        to a comment a friend of mine made years ago. He was tired of fantasy in
        which everyone was a noble, fighter, mage, or priest, and no one seemed to
        be doing the work that would have been necessary to feed and clothe all of
        them. There's a certain blanket in Drowned Ammet that shows that Jones
        didn't make that mistake. I mean, okay, a lot of things show it, but that's
        the one I remember best.

        -Lisa Padol



        ------------------------------------

        The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.orgYahoo! Groups Links
      • Jason Fisher
        A very good idea, Berni. I had planned to run a short announcement, but something longer and fuller would be most welcome. I would like to read something like
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 27, 2011
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          A very good idea, Berni. I had planned to run a short announcement, but something longer and fuller would be most welcome. I would like to read something like this myself.


          From: bernip <bernip@...>
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, March 27, 2011 2:12:10 AM
          Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Diana Wynne Jones

           

          It sounds like someone (who is not me, as I'm not that conversant with her
          work) should write up an article for Mythprint and send it to Jason. Any
          takers? I'll bet a lot of us would like to read it.

          Berni


          -----Original Message-----
          From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          Lisa Padol
          Sent: Saturday, March 26, 2011 11:13 PM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Diana Wynne Jones

          I can't decide which of Cart and Cwidder or The Spellcoats is my favorite. I
          remember laughing until my sides hurt when reading some of her other books.

          And, while Drowned Ammet wasn't my absolute favorite, it was a good answer
          to a comment a friend of mine made years ago. He was tired of fantasy in
          which everyone was a noble, fighter, mage, or priest, and no one seemed to
          be doing the work that would have been necessary to feed and clothe all of
          them. There's a certain blanket in Drowned Ammet that shows that Jones
          didn't make that mistake. I mean, okay, a lot of things show it, but that's
          the one I remember best.

          -Lisa Padol

          ------------------------------------

          The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.orgYahoo! Groups Links

        • David Lenander
          I only met Ms. Jones once or twice--I think she was at a local con (was it WFC? 4th Street? Minicon?), and maybe we had a Rivendell discussion that she might
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 27, 2011
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            I only met Ms. Jones once or twice--I think she was at a local con (was it WFC? 4th Street? Minicon?), and maybe we had a Rivendell discussion that she might have been at, but I did hear her speak at the Children's Literature Research Collections for sure.  

            She was extremely nice and told the funniest stories, I still repeat one fairly often about the "rewriting" that she did for her editor on _Charmed Life_.  She signed my copy.  I still love that book about as well as any, though I think her best is _The Spellcoats_, and _Drowned Ammet_ is nearly as good, and _Archer's Goon_, and _Dogsbody_, and _Howl's Moving Castle_, and _Fire and Hemlock_--which is her most ambitious book, but which I don't think quite works.  Her latest book, I hope it's not the last in the pipeline, but maybe it is, is _Enchanted Glass_, and I read it pretty much in one sitting, yesterday.  I liked it a lot.  It's a bit more for the younger reader than some of the others that I mentioned, which I liked, but somehow doesn't reach the mythopoeic resonance of _Dogsbody_.  It does have a dog--well ... a were-dog, and a boy, and if it's the last DWJ we're to have, it's a fine book to go out on.  Read it and her others.  

            I was surprised at how saddened that learning of her death left me feeling.  After all, I'd barely met her, and as much as I loved many of her books, I'd heard of her discontinuing her chemotherapy quite some time back.  So this wasn't a surprise. In _Enchanted Glass_ her chief protagonist, the boy, Aidan, has to deal with grief over his grandmother's death, and there's  a little discussion among several characters about loss and grief, I couldn't help thinking of all the people who seemed to love Diana Wynne Jones so well, a couple of them, also writers like Jane Yolen and Neil Gaiman and Emma Bull have written in the last 24 hours or so.  As we age, we have more and more such losses and grief, and certainly a part of life is learning how to go on living after these losses--even where we don't "get over" grief, which really lurks around and can suddenly be as sharp as ever, decades later.  I've always thought of this experience as lurking in a silverware drawer, when you reach in for a fork and get stabbed unexpectedly by a knife (or a fork, I guess).  She actually used the metaphor of a cup in the cupboard in this book.  What a wise woman and writer she was.  I'm glad that she's left us so much of her wisdom in her books.  


            David Lenander
            2095 Hamline Ave. N.
            Roseville, MN 55113
            651-292-8887  or 651-697-1807
            Gwnewch y pethau bychain mewn bywyd



          • Jo Foster
            Has everyone seen this from Neil Gaiman? http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2011/03/being-alive.html
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 27, 2011
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              Has everyone seen this from Neil Gaiman?

               

              http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2011/03/being-alive.html

               

               

               



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            • lynnmaudlin
              thanks, Jo-- I hadn t. -- Lynn --
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 4, 2011
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                thanks, Jo-- I hadn't.

                -- Lynn --


                --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, "Jo Foster" <jfoster@...> wrote:
                >
                > Has everyone seen this from Neil Gaiman?
                >
                >
                >
                > http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2011/03/being-alive.html
                >
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