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RE: [mythsoc] Gaius and Titius and Orbilius

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  • Croft, Janet B.
    My master index shows no Mythlore or published Mythcon proceedings papers on the topic. As far as papers that were presented but not published, I don’t know,
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 8, 2010
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      My master index shows no Mythlore or published Mythcon proceedings papers on the topic. As far as papers that were presented but not published, I don’t know, but that might be another index that could be developed at some point!

       

      Janet

       

      From: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:mythsoc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of WendellWag@...
      Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2010 8:57 PM
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Gaius and Titius and Orbilius

       

       

      Thanks, David.  I've got that book but haven't read it yet.  When I looked in it (after using Google to find out which pages The Control of Language is mentioned on), I see that there is a three-page discussion of it.  It's longer than a brief mention, but it's not really a thorough examination of the book.  It's mostly following Lewis's argument in The Abolition of Man without looking any deeper.  Jacobs makes one interesting observation though, which is that Lewis's own copy of The Control of Language is in the Wade Center at Wheaton College and it has annotations by Lewis.  Jacobs doesn't mention The Reading and Writing of English at all.

       

      Wendell Wagner

       

      In a message dated 11/7/2010 9:09:26 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, d-lena@... writes:

       

      That's interesting, Wendell.  I'd say that the discussion goes beyond a "brief mention" in _The Narnian: The Life & Imagination of C.S. Lewis_ by Alan Jacobs, though you've probably read that.  But, just in case you haven't, you'd definitely want to look at it before writing a paper. 

       

      On Nov 7, 2010, at 5:50 AM, mythsoc@yahoogroups.com wrote:



      Having now read Gaius and Titius and Orbilius

      Posted by: "WendellWag@..." WendellWag@...  wendell_wagner

      Sat Nov 6, 2010 11:43 am (PDT)

      As I mentioned two months ago, I decided to read The Control of Language: 
      A Critical Approach to Reading and Wr iting by Alec King and Martin Ketley 
      and The Reading and Writing of English by E. G. Biaggini. The first book is 
      the one referred to in C. S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man as The Green 
      Book by Gaius and Titius and the second book, not given a name in The 
      Abolition of Man, is the one supposedly written by Orbilius. Has anyone ever done 
      a paper at Mythcon or published an article in any Mythopoeic publication 
      about them? It's hard for me to tell just from Googling, but it appears to 
      me that they are briefly mentioned in a couple of books about Lewis. Has 
      anyone read any lengthy analysis of these books in relation to Lewis? These 
      books, especially The Control of Language, are long out of print and rather 
      hard to find these days, although you might be able to get them on used 
      books websites.[. . .]

       

      David Lenander

      2095 Hamline Ave. N.

      Roseville, MN 55113

       

      651-292-8887

       

       

       

    • Cole Matson
      Wendell, I ve held the copy of The Control of Language at the Wade, and if I remember correctly, it s heavily annotated, but mainly near the front (though
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 10, 2010
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        Wendell,

        I've held the copy of The Control of Language at the Wade, and if I remember correctly, it's heavily annotated, but mainly near the front (though there are some notes and page references on the inside back cover). Don't take my word for it, though; I'd recommend looking at the book yourself if you were to write an article. You can see how some of his immediate reactions translated into arguments in Abolition of Man.

        Cole Matson
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