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Advertisement for Broadway performance of Screwtape letters

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  • davise@cs.nyu.edu
    I have not seen this, and do not endorse it, but I m passing on the information. -- Ernie C. S. Lewis The Screwtape Letters starring Max McLean as Screwtape
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 14, 2010
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      I have not seen this, and do not endorse it, but I'm passing on the information. -- Ernie

      C. S. Lewis'
      The Screwtape Letters
      starring Max McLean as Screwtape

      See the show that has critics and audiences raving!

      C. S. Lewis' brilliant novel, The Screwtape Letters, reveals spiritual
      warfare from a demon's point of view. This funny, provocative and
      wickedly-witty theatrical adaptation will change the way you think about how demons influence your everyday life.

      "ONE HELL OF A GOOD SHOW!" - Wall Street Journal

      "CLEVERLY IMAGINED, AN AMUSING PRIMER OF
      MODERN VICE!" - New Yorker


      "DEVILISHLY FUNNY, LEWIS'S INSIGHTS INTO HUMAN NATURE ARE CLEVERLY
      CONVEYED!" - Associated Press

      "HIGHLY SEDUCTIVE!" - Daily News

      MUST ORDER BY SEPTEMBER 30th (reg. $75)

      Summer Performance Schedule (thru Sept 5th)
      $35* - Wed at 2pm
      $39* - Mon at 7pm, Tues at 7pm, Sun at 7pm
      $49* - Fri at 8pm, Sat at 4pm & 8pm, Sun at 3pm

      Fall Performance Schedule (begins Sept 6th)
      $35* - Wed at 2pm
      $39* - Mon, Thu at 8pm, Sun at 7pm
      $49* - Fri at 8pm, Sat at 4pm & 8pm, Sun at 3pm


      Seats are limited, so act now!
      Run time: 80 minutes
      Notice: From Aug. 13-18 the role of Screwtape will be played by Steven
      Hauck.

      3 EASY WAYS TO PURCHASE TICKETS:

      1. Visit BroadwayOffers.com [email.theatermania.com] and enter code SLTMC44

      2. Call 212-947-8844 and mention code SLTMC44

      3. Bring a printout of this email to the Westside Theatre, 407 W. 43rd
      Street between 9th and 10th Aves. Box office hours: Mon-Sun, Noon-6pm

      For GROUPS of 10 or more call 866-476-8707


      WATCH VIDEO HERE [email.theatermania.com]
      OR VISIT SCREWTAPEONSTAGE.COM [email.theatermania.com]
      ALSO ON FACEBOOK [email.theatermania.com]

      Discount Price: As low as $35!
      Regular Price: $75


      *Conditions: Subject to availability & blackout dates. Valid on performances through Oct. 17. Offer expires September 30 but may be revoked at any time. Not valid on prior purchases and cannot be combined with any other offer. All sales final. No refunds or exchanges. Telephone and internet orders are subject to standard fees. Limit eight tickets per order. A Production of
      Fellowship for the Performing Arts, One High Street Court, Morristown, New Jersey 07960. Offer Expires 09/30/2010.
       
    • Mike Foster
      Well, SCREWTAPE isn t really a novel; it s a collection of fictional letters, an epistolary novel if anything. C.S. Lewis dedicated it to Tolkien & latersaid
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 14, 2010
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        Well, SCREWTAPE isn't really a novel; it's a collection of fictional letters, an "epistolary novel" if anything.
         
        C.S. Lewis dedicated it to Tolkien & latersaid the book had given him the least plerasure and satistfaction of any he had written.  JRRT sometimes mused on those facts.
         
        Cheers,
        Mike Foster,
        Metamora, Illinois


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        The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

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      • Kathleen Lamantia
        I just saw Freud s Last Session off_Broadway about 10 days ago. I was very trepidatious going in, as I feared they would not do justice to our man, but I can
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 14, 2010
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          I just saw Freud's Last Session off_Broadway about 10 days ago.

          I was very trepidatious going in, as I feared they would not do justice to our man, but I can recommend the play whole-heartedly.  My only caveat was that the actor who played Lewis sometimes ducked his head diffidently, as if Fred had scored a point in their discussion.

          So far as I know, Lewis was never diffident, even at 41 as he would have been on the date the play takes place, Sept. 3, 1939. 

          I felt the presentation of both viewpoints was fair and balanced.  There was humor, pathos, and excellent give-and-take.    I have been reading Lewis for 40 years and did not find any error in the script.  I know very little about Freud, so I cannot speak for his lines, but my daughter, with whom I attended, is very famillar with him.  In her opinion, his portrayal was also very accurate.

          I came away with great respect for the playwright.  It cannot have been easy to create a realistic and interesting play from the vast amounts of writing these two produced.  I give it two hearty thumbs up.

          I would very much enjoy hearing from anyone else who has seen this.

           





          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          From: mafoster@...
          Date: Sat, 14 Aug 2010 11:08:57 -0500
          Subject: [mythsoc] Advertisement for Broadway performance of Screwtape letters

           

          Well, SCREWTAPE isn't really a novel; it's a collection of fictional letters, an "epistolary novel" if anything.
           
          C.S. Lewis dedicated it to Tolkien & latersaid the book had given him the least plerasure and satistfaction of any he had written.  JRRT sometimes mused on those facts.
           
          Cheers,
          Mike Foster,
          Metamora, Illinois


          __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5366 (20100814) __________

          The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

          http://www.eset.com

        • Carl F. Hostetter
          ... All you want is a dingle What you envy s a schwang A thing through which you can tinkle Or play with, or simply let hang... .
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 14, 2010
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            On Aug 14, 2010, at 7:21 PM, Kathleen Lamantia wrote:

            > I just saw Freud's Last Session off_Broadway about 10 days ago.

            "All you want is a dingle
            What you envy's a schwang
            A thing through which you can tinkle
            Or play with, or simply let hang...".

            <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wkcobSvExM>
          • David Emerson
            ... Joey s shining moment! emerdavid ________________________________________ PeoplePC Online A better way to Internet http://www.peoplepc.com
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 15, 2010
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              >> I just saw Freud's Last Session off_Broadway about 10 days ago.
              >
              >"All you want is a dingle
              >What you envy's a schwang
              >A thing through which you can tinkle
              >Or play with, or simply let hang...".
              >
              ><http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wkcobSvExM>

              Joey's shining moment!

              emerdavid

              ________________________________________
              PeoplePC Online
              A better way to Internet
              http://www.peoplepc.com
            • Cole Matson
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 15, 2010
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                Re: Advertisement for Broadway performance of Screwtape letters

                Posted by: "Kathleen Lamantia" kathleen_lamantia@...   kathleen_lamantia

                Sat Aug 14, 2010 4:21 pm (PDT)

                I saw Freud's Last Session a couple weeks ago. I also went in unsure of what to expect, but I thought the playwright, director and performers did a good job. The only quibbles I had were that Lewis was addressed in the script (and described in the program) as "Professor," when he didn't have a professorship until fifteen years later, and as Kathleen pointed out, the actor playing Lewis appeared to take one too many tips from the Anthony Hopkins school of playing Lewis and portrayed him, at least earlier in the show, as intimidated by going up against a giant like Freud, kind of like a kid going up in front of the principal with his tail between his legs after the teacher caught him writing a mocking limerick about him that the kid didn't think anyone would see. (Lewis initially thinks Freud wants to chew him out for satirizing his ideas in The Pilgrim's Regress.) I think Lewis actually would have been happy to go blow-for-blow in the combat of intellectual disputation, and wouldn't have been nervous about or backed down from defending in person the arguments he had put forth in print. In this play, however, there were several moments earlier on where Lewis appeared to have to stop and collect himself out of anxiety.

                The character found his feet later in the play, though, and we did see Lewis scoring points on Freud. It became a pretty evenly-matched battle, both of them pushing each other's buttons, but always with mutual respect, as I think would have actually happened if they had met. The playwright and actors succeeded in getting you to care about both men deeply. And even though I disagreed with the actor's choice on how to play Lewis, I thought both he and the actor playing Freud did an excellent job. And one thing I was not expecting - it was FUNNY. The audience was roaring quite regularly.

                So while there are some things I would change if I produced it (which I'm considering doing), I recommend it whole-heartedly.

                Cole Matson
                http://colematson.com


                I just saw Freud's Last Session off_Broadway about 10 days ago.

                I was very trepidatious going in, as I feared they would not do justice to our man, but I can recommend the play whole-heartedly. My only caveat was that the actor who played Lewis sometimes ducked his head diffidently, as if Fred had scored a point in their discussion.

                So far as I know, Lewis was never diffident, even at 41 as he would have been on the date the play takes place, Sept. 3, 1939.

                I felt the presentation of both viewpoints was fair and balanced. There was humor, pathos, and excellent give-and-take. I have been reading Lewis for 40 years and did not find any error in the script. I know very little about Freud, so I cannot speak for his lines, but my daughter, with whom I attended, is very famillar with him. In her opinion, his portrayal was also very accurate.

                I came away with great respect for the playwright. It cannot have been easy to create a realistic and interesting play from the vast amounts of writing these two produced. I give it two hearty thumbs up.

                I would very much enjoy hearing from anyone else who has seen this.


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