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Re: [mythsoc] Harry Potter in the Original English?

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  • James P. Robinson III
    I have to agree that the changing of philosopher s stone in the title and throughout the text, a term with specific resonance, implications and history, into
    Message 1 of 47 , Aug 10, 2000
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      I have to agree that the changing of "philosopher's stone" in the title and
      throughout the text, a term with specific resonance, implications and
      history, into "sorcerer's stone" is indeed major.

      As the clock struck 10:45 AM 8/10/2000 -0400, WendellWag@... took pen
      in hand and wrote:
      >In a message dated 8/10/00 10:26:27 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Stolzi@...
      >writes:
      >
      ><< But that's the one that is major dumbing-down! >>
      >
      >One word in the title is a "major" dumbing-dumb? Annoying and pointless,
      >yes, but major?

      --
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      James P. Robinson III jprobins@...

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    • Wayne G. Hammond
      ... So publishers may think, narrow-mindedly. I like to think that even Americans might find a phrase like philosopher s stone intriguing rather than
      Message 47 of 47 , Aug 15, 2000
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        >I read that the publisher thought that Americans wouldn't buy a book,
        >especially for children, if it had "philosopher's" anything in the title.
        >Alas! Probably too close to the truth.

        So publishers may think, narrow-mindedly. I like to think that even
        Americans might find a phrase like "philosopher's stone" intriguing rather
        than off-putting. I do, and certainly children are attracted to such
        things, even if some adults are not. I first read about the Philosopher's
        Stone in Flash comics in the 1960s, when DC were throwing all sorts of
        education at its young audience without us realizing, and liked the sound
        of the words as much as the concept.

        Rowling's publishers, both of them I gather, of course also felt that no
        boy would read a book by a female author, hence "J.K." rather than
        "Joanne". It never bothered me as a young reader who wrote a book as long
        as it was good, and there can be few male Harry Potter fans now who don't
        know that Rowling is a woman.

        Wayne Hammond
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