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Re: [mythsoc] LotR films-related blog/book

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  • dale nelson
    This is reminding me of Scream for Jeeves, the Wodehouse-Meets-Lovecraft book of some years back. ________________________________ From: John Rateliff
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 26, 2010
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      This is reminding me of Scream for Jeeves, the Wodehouse-Meets-Lovecraft book of some years back.


      From: John Rateliff <sacnoth@...>
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, April 26, 2010 1:01:39 PM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] LotR films-related blog/book

       

      Hi Mike
         It's called WOOSTER PROPOSES, JEEVES DISPOSES, or, Le Mot Juste [1992].
         Thanks for the amazon link, Janet. I just checked and found it's also available on bookfinder.com and abebooks.com (the latter starting at about $35, which probably isn't much more than it cost new). 
         I do recommend it for admirers of Wodehouse's writings -- for example, I hadn't realized before reading its chapter on the short stories that Wodehouse had two separate sets of friends for Bertie, one appearing in the novels (like Gussie Fink-Nottle) and one for the short stories (like Bingo Little), with the two rarely if ever mixing. The chapter on the plays was also helpful, since I never have been able to find the Bertie-without- Jeeves play she discusses (though I have found the Jeeves-without- Bertie book). Maybe the best part was a brief discussion of what does Jeeves get out of all this, concluding that quite apart from anything else staying with Bertie significantly improves Jeeves' standard of living.
         Anyway, a quick check of WorldCat shows there are quite a few copies out there in public (e.g., Milwaukee) and university (e.g., Univ. of Wisc, Madison) libraries, so inter-library loan shd be an easy way for you to check it out, if you're interested.
         By the way, have you heard the sad news that the Tolkien BOOK OF JONAH book is apparently kaput?
      --JDR


      On Apr 25, 2010, at 2:43 PM, Mike Foster wrote:
      As you may know, I am a great Jeeves fan.  What is the title of Ms. Thompson's Wodehouse book?


    • lynnmaudlin
      John, cool to realize that the JEEVES stories were written over 60 years! And Sara, I appreciate your very carefully phrased post!!! ;) -- Lynn --
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 26, 2010
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        John, cool to realize that the JEEVES stories were written over 60 years! And Sara, I appreciate your very carefully phrased post!!! ;)

        -- Lynn --


        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Sara
        >
        > Kristin is a longtime member of the University of Wisconsin Tolkien Society. I wdn't say she approves of the "commodification" so much as that she has made it her task to record how Tolkien became a mass-market phenomenon in the last decade through the films. Her book is probably the best account of the films and their making we're likely to get, and her blog continually updates its aftermath (work on the prequel, further projects by people involved on the original films, &c). So, a valuable resource for those interested in the films or in the craziness associated with them. Not relevant for discussion of Tolkien's works themselves -- but luckily there are plenty more good books that do that.
        > By the way, she's also the author of an excellent book on P. G. Wodehouse's JEEVES series, which she argues is the longest running literary series where a single author wrote about the same set of characters (first story: 1914; last story: 1974).
        >
        > --JDR
        >
        > On Apr 25, 2010, at 6:55 AM, saraciborski wrote:
        > > Hoping not to re-open the much-debated (often acrimoniously) topic of the worthiness of Peter Jackson's films....I pass on an online finding (time-waster?). In today's NY Times, an article on film critic David Bordwell has a link to his website, which in turn offers a link to a blog called The Frodo Franchise. This is run by Bordwell's partner, someone named Kristin Thompson, who in addition to her blog has written a book called The Frodo Franchise: The Lord of the Rings and Modern Hollywood (2007). It appears to be about--not the films as such--but their commodification of the book, which she judges a good thing, and their impact on the business of film-making, which is another good thing. Being neither pro-film nor pro-film's-effect-on-movie-making I am not recommending it. I post this just in case there's someone in our mythsoc circle who wants to keep up on these things and apologize if this book has already been noted here.
        > > jm
        >
      • John Rateliff
        ... Yes, a wonderful little book. There s a rather disappointing expanded edition, FOREVER AZATHOTH [1999], but all the good stuff is in the slim original,
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 27, 2010
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          On Apr 26, 2010, at 12:18 PM, dale nelson wrote:
          This is reminding me of Scream for Jeeves, the Wodehouse-Meets-Lovecraft book of some years back.

          Yes, a wonderful little book. There's a rather disappointing expanded edition, FOREVER AZATHOTH [1999], but all the good stuff is in the slim original, especially the first story retelling "The Rats in the Walls" as a Bertie-and-Jeeves tale.

          The only other Wodehouse pastiche I've seen to match it is John Ellison's STIFF UPPER LIP, BILBO [1987], also known as THE ALTERNATIVE HOBBIT, which recasts Bilbo as a Bertie-Wooster type and retells the events of THE HOBBIT accordingly. Wonderful stuff, if you like that kind of thing. I suspect this parody fits the tale so easily because there probably was some influence from Wodehouse on Tolkien's nomenclature ('Bilbo', 'Bingo', &c).


          On a more sober note, the book WODEHOUSE AT WAR by Iain Sproat [1981] retells how English's most popular comic novelist was driven into a thirty-year exile under McCarthy-esque accusations of having collaborated with the Nazis while briefly a prisoner of war in 1940. 



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