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Re: [mythsoc] Growing Up from mainstream

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  • Diane Joy Baker
    ... From: David Lenander To: Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2000 1:14 AM Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 10 5:39 AM
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: David Lenander <d-lena@...>
      To: <mythsoc@egroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2000 1:14 AM
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion


      > I really
      > think the Susan Cooper Dark Is Rising books are ethically objectionable,
      and
      > rather complex, and would prefer that she wait on reading them, but I
      allowed
      > her to borrow the audiotapes for listening on our trip to Hawaii next week
      for
      > Mythcon.

      I remember reading and enjoying the *Dark is Rising* series (though not as a
      kid) and am curious about your take on the "ethically objectionable" parts.

      I'm actually surprised at how much fantasy was out there which I did not
      have the chance to read or never came across when I was a child, but which I
      have read subsequently as an adult. Apparently, as a child I read more
      mainstream than fantasy. I remember reading *Black Beauty,* *Tom Sawyer*
      and *Huck Finn,* *The Secret Garden* (which I loved) and Elizabeth Enright
      as a child. Of course, I read fairy tales, probably too early to even
      recall the experience with clarity; the one I most returned to was "East o'
      the Sun and West o' the Moon." I also recall a book about Greek myths,
      which were fascinating. (Some anthology of tales for children, IIRC). I
      remember several books about young girls who wanted to be ballerinas and
      Beverly Cleary books from when I was younger. Then, there was Maude Hart
      Lovelace (I loved that name), and a number of Nancy Drew books (until I
      realized how dreadful they were in style). I loved SF, and read Asimov and
      Bradbury somewhere between the sixth and eighth grades. Sherlock Holmes and
      Poe somewhere around then, too. (Loved Poe because he sent me to the
      dictionary for new words!)

      As a teen, I read a steady diet of SF (with more Bradbury, Clarke and
      Heinlein). I'm not sure exactly when I read Bram Stoker, but didn't get
      into Narnia, or L'Engle until I got into *college.* I don't think my
      parents censored my reading all that much or steered me away from fantasy.
      I simply read what I was exposed to or came across in libraries: if I had
      heard about Narnia earlier, I'm sure I would have read and loved it! I kept
      thinking after I read it, "why didn't I see this as a child?" I did get
      Tolkien for Christmas one year in my late teens, and in the back of my mind
      associated LOTR with some vague connection to drugs and hippies (must have
      been that strange cover from the sixties), but that silly idea didn't keep
      me from reading it before college, esp. after reading *The Hobbit.* After
      that, of course, there was no hope, and I was a confirmed fantasy addict.
      Guess you can say I "grew up" to fantasy! ---djb.
    • Steve Schaper
      ... I seem to recall that the last book in the series taught that there was no more difference between good and evil than the purple and green Drazi, and that
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 10 6:10 AM
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        At 8:39 AM -0400 8/10/00, Diane Joy Baker wrote:
        >
        >I remember reading and enjoying the *Dark is Rising* series (though not as a
        >kid) and am curious about your take on the "ethically objectionable" parts.

        I seem to recall that the last book in the series taught that there
        was no more difference between good and evil than the purple and
        green Drazi, and that Jesus Christ would not return, ever. Maybe a
        bit much for a children's book?

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