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Peter Jackson knighted

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  • John Rateliff
    Just saw the news that Peter Jackson has now become Sir Peter for services to film ; the write-up I saw emphasized his LotR work and the forthcoming HOBBIT.*
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 31, 2009
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      Just saw the news that Peter Jackson has now become Sir Peter for
      "services to film"; the write-up I saw emphasized his LotR work and
      the forthcoming HOBBIT.*

      http://www.seattlepi.com/movies/1402ap_as_people_peter_jackson.html

      Interesting that these days they seem to be giving it to folks much
      earlier in their careers --cf. Hitchcock, Chaplin, and Wodehouse, who
      were all at death's door before getting theirs. Though I suppose
      Stanley Unwin was a rather youngish sixty-two when he became Sir
      Stanley.

      --John R.


      *as opposed, say, to FORGOTTEN SILVER, a brilliant but obscure
      mockumentary
    • David Bratman
      ... Theatrical knights of any kind were rather rare before the mid-20th century, though not entirely unknown. Customs on who get these kinds of awards and
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 31, 2009
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        John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:

        >Interesting that these days they seem to be giving it to folks much
        >earlier in their careers --cf. Hitchcock, Chaplin, and Wodehouse, who
        >were all at death's door before getting theirs. Though I suppose
        >Stanley Unwin was a rather youngish sixty-two when he became Sir
        >Stanley.

        "Theatrical knights" of any kind were rather rare before the mid-20th century, though not entirely unknown. Customs on who get these kinds of awards and when have definitely been changing. (There was a huge fuss when the Beatles were given mere M.B.E.s in 1965; nowadays they might have been given knighthoods almost that early.)

        Giving knighthoods to somewhat more conventionally "serious" cultural figures, including publishers like Sir Stanley, came along a bit earlier, hence, perhaps, his somewhat younger age than the theatrical knights of his generation.
      • icelofangeln
        It also doesn t hurt that he s a New Zealander, since NZ has its own system of Honours separate from the UK/Commonwealth, and PJ is probably the most famous
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 1, 2010
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          It also doesn't hurt that he's a New Zealander, since NZ has its own system of Honours separate from the UK/Commonwealth, and PJ is probably the most famous Kiwi since Edmund Hillary. Interestingly, NZ has reversed its 2000 policy of No Knighthoods, arguably in part because of public pressure on behalf of Jackson.

          --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, David Bratman <dbratman@...> wrote:
          >
          > John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
          >
          > >Interesting that these days they seem to be giving it to folks much
          > >earlier in their careers --cf. Hitchcock, Chaplin, and Wodehouse, who
          > >were all at death's door before getting theirs. Though I suppose
          > >Stanley Unwin was a rather youngish sixty-two when he became Sir
          > >Stanley.
          >
          > "Theatrical knights" of any kind were rather rare before the mid-20th century, though not entirely unknown. Customs on who get these kinds of awards and when have definitely been changing. (There was a huge fuss when the Beatles were given mere M.B.E.s in 1965; nowadays they might have been given knighthoods almost that early.)
          >
          > Giving knighthoods to somewhat more conventionally "serious" cultural figures, including publishers like Sir Stanley, came along a bit earlier, hence, perhaps, his somewhat younger age than the theatrical knights of his generation.
          >
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