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Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion

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  • Christine Howlett
    I m puzzled at how many people compare the Potter books to Golden Compass. Having read and enjoyed both, I wouldn t have thought they were in the same
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
      I'm puzzled at how many people compare the Potter books to Golden Compass.
      Having read and enjoyed both, I wouldn't have thought they were in the same
      ballpark, frankly. But then I'm still surprised that GC is recommended for
      *children*; I found the plot rather complicated and the story quite dark
      even in the first volume. I wouldn't hand the second volume to a child at
      all. A 15 - 16 year old could probably read and enjoy (if that's the word).
      The Potter books I would feel fine about giving to any kid who could cope
      with the vocabulary - 9, 10 year olds anyway. Though I found lots to enjoy
      in them myself. Also blowing my mind: the reaction of some real
      conservative Christians to HP - really negative - compared to reactions to
      GC - not a peep! But I found quite a lot of anti-clericalism in the second
      volume of GC, enough to make me wonder about the writer's motivation. I'm
      not really looking forward to the last volume, truthfully.

      Christine


      -----Original Message-----
      From: David Lenander <d-lena@...>
      To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
      Date: Wednesday, August 09, 2000 3:00 PM
      Subject: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion


      >I've heard this before, but I know that it's not entirely accurate. I
      thought that
      >the Golden Compass had an impressive marketing campaign behind it when I
      first
      >heard of the book, it was on a big display at Barnes & Noble. But I'd been
      hearing
      >about Harry Potter before the book was pubilshed in America as the great
      new
      >fantasy. There were signs up about its coming at my local bookstore BEFORE
      it was
      >published, and when I saw it at that bookstore first, it was a big pile on
      the
      >front counter and they were promoting it. I bought it immediately (somehow
      >expecting something as good as The Golden Compass (nee Northern Lights)),
      and read
      >it immediately, being rather disappointed, and especially sorry when soon
      after I
      >saw it deeply discounted at Barnes & Noble and/or Borders. Now maybe it
      wasn't
      >promoted with huge ads in the newspapers and beautiful posters, but I ask
      you
      >(someone can forward this to Jane Yolen or Sherwood Smith or Kara Dalkey)
      what
      >other recent children's fantasies have been on the counters of the local
      bookstores
      >and deeply discounted at Borders? When they published Harry Potter they
      can't have
      >been expecting it would be the best-selling release ever, but they were
      clearly
      >expecting sales above Jane Yolen's for "Young Merlin" or _Wizard's Hall_,
      or
      >Sherwood Smith's for the "Crown & Court Duet" or Kara Dalkey's for the
      _Little
      >Sister_ books.
      >
    • Sophie Masson
      I think the third volume, The Amber Spyglass, does address many of these concerns. I know Philip reasonably well, and know that his perspective is not
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
        I think the third volume, The Amber Spyglass, does address many of these
        concerns. I know Philip reasonably well, and know that his perspective is
        not anti-religious at all--but the working out of his story, based on
        Milton's Paradise LOst(where of course Lucifer appears as a kind of hero, at
        least at first)demanded the kinds of explorations he's done.
        I agree with you about his books not really being for children-theyare
        certainly for a much older audience than HP. However, my feeling is that
        Rowling is like a kind of modern Lewis, whose Narnia-like series is for
        children under 14; and Pullman like a modern Tolkien, for much older kids
        and adults, like LOTR.
        Sophie
        Author site:
        http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Christine Howlett <chowlett@...>
        To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
        Date: Thursday, 10 August 2000 6:47
        Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion


        >I'm puzzled at how many people compare the Potter books to Golden Compass.
        >Having read and enjoyed both, I wouldn't have thought they were in the same
        >ballpark, frankly. But then I'm still surprised that GC is recommended for
        >*children*; I found the plot rather complicated and the story quite dark
        >even in the first volume. I wouldn't hand the second volume to a child at
        >all. A 15 - 16 year old could probably read and enjoy (if that's the
        word).
        >The Potter books I would feel fine about giving to any kid who could cope
        >with the vocabulary - 9, 10 year olds anyway. Though I found lots to
        enjoy
        >in them myself. Also blowing my mind: the reaction of some real
        >conservative Christians to HP - really negative - compared to reactions to
        >GC - not a peep! But I found quite a lot of anti-clericalism in the second
        >volume of GC, enough to make me wonder about the writer's motivation. I'm
        >not really looking forward to the last volume, truthfully.
        >
        >Christine
        >
        >
        >-----Original Message-----
        >From: David Lenander <d-lena@...>
        >To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
        >Date: Wednesday, August 09, 2000 3:00 PM
        >Subject: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion
        >
        >
        >>I've heard this before, but I know that it's not entirely accurate. I
        >thought that
        >>the Golden Compass had an impressive marketing campaign behind it when I
        >first
        >>heard of the book, it was on a big display at Barnes & Noble. But I'd
        been
        >hearing
        >>about Harry Potter before the book was pubilshed in America as the great
        >new
        >>fantasy. There were signs up about its coming at my local bookstore
        BEFORE
        >it was
        >>published, and when I saw it at that bookstore first, it was a big pile on
        >the
        >>front counter and they were promoting it. I bought it immediately
        (somehow
        >>expecting something as good as The Golden Compass (nee Northern Lights)),
        >and read
        >>it immediately, being rather disappointed, and especially sorry when soon
        >after I
        >>saw it deeply discounted at Barnes & Noble and/or Borders. Now maybe it
        >wasn't
        >>promoted with huge ads in the newspapers and beautiful posters, but I ask
        >you
        >>(someone can forward this to Jane Yolen or Sherwood Smith or Kara Dalkey)
        >what
        >>other recent children's fantasies have been on the counters of the local
        >bookstores
        >>and deeply discounted at Borders? When they published Harry Potter they
        >can't have
        >>been expecting it would be the best-selling release ever, but they were
        >clearly
        >>expecting sales above Jane Yolen's for "Young Merlin" or _Wizard's Hall_,
        >or
        >>Sherwood Smith's for the "Crown & Court Duet" or Kara Dalkey's for the
        >_Little
        >>Sister_ books.
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >
      • Ted Sherman
        Pullman may not be antireligious, but comments he has made in various venues (interviews primarily) do suggest a rather hostile attitude to
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
          Pullman may not be antireligious, but comments he has made in various venues
          (interviews primarily) do suggest a rather hostile attitude to
          traditional/orthodox Christianity. Keep in mind that His Dark Materials is
          Paradise Lost rewritten for the late 20th century and for an adolescent audience
          (I'm not making this up, these are Pullman's words from interviews). And he has
          a rather interesting (nice bland adjective there, but I don't want to
          characterize his thoughts/beliefs further) take on the Fall (both the historic
          one [for those who believe in the Fall] and the poetic one in Paradise Lost).

          I'm eagerly awaiting The Amber Spyglass, which I have assigned (with the other
          two Dark Materials novels) to my fantasy lit students this fall. I'm also, to
          follow the trend crowd ;), assigning the first three HP books, along with
          MacDonald's Short Stories, The Tolkien Reader, and Till We Have Faces.

          As Margaret Dean said earlier, I'm somewhat surprised at the comparison of the
          HP books to Pullman's. They're apples and oranges and you can't compare them,
          just as you can't compare the Narnia books with The Lord of the Rings.

          Ted

          Sophie Masson wrote:

          > I think the third volume, The Amber Spyglass, does address many of these
          > concerns. I know Philip reasonably well, and know that his perspective is
          > not anti-religious at all--but the working out of his story, based on
          > Milton's Paradise LOst(where of course Lucifer appears as a kind of hero, at
          > least at first)demanded the kinds of explorations he's done.
          > I agree with you about his books not really being for children-theyare
          > certainly for a much older audience than HP. However, my feeling is that
          > Rowling is like a kind of modern Lewis, whose Narnia-like series is for
          > children under 14; and Pullman like a modern Tolkien, for much older kids
          > and adults, like LOTR.
          > Sophie
          > Author site:
          > http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Christine Howlett <chowlett@...>
          > To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
          > Date: Thursday, 10 August 2000 6:47
          > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion
          >
          > >I'm puzzled at how many people compare the Potter books to Golden Compass.
          > >Having read and enjoyed both, I wouldn't have thought they were in the same
          > >ballpark, frankly. But then I'm still surprised that GC is recommended for
          > >*children*; I found the plot rather complicated and the story quite dark
          > >even in the first volume. I wouldn't hand the second volume to a child at
          > >all. A 15 - 16 year old could probably read and enjoy (if that's the
          > word).
          > >The Potter books I would feel fine about giving to any kid who could cope
          > >with the vocabulary - 9, 10 year olds anyway. Though I found lots to
          > enjoy
          > >in them myself. Also blowing my mind: the reaction of some real
          > >conservative Christians to HP - really negative - compared to reactions to
          > >GC - not a peep! But I found quite a lot of anti-clericalism in the second
          > >volume of GC, enough to make me wonder about the writer's motivation. I'm
          > >not really looking forward to the last volume, truthfully.
          > >
          > >Christine
          > >
          > >
          > >-----Original Message-----
          > >From: David Lenander <d-lena@...>
          > >To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
          > >Date: Wednesday, August 09, 2000 3:00 PM
          > >Subject: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion
          > >
          > >
          > >>I've heard this before, but I know that it's not entirely accurate. I
          > >thought that
          > >>the Golden Compass had an impressive marketing campaign behind it when I
          > >first
          > >>heard of the book, it was on a big display at Barnes & Noble. But I'd
          > been
          > >hearing
          > >>about Harry Potter before the book was pubilshed in America as the great
          > >new
          > >>fantasy. There were signs up about its coming at my local bookstore
          > BEFORE
          > >it was
          > >>published, and when I saw it at that bookstore first, it was a big pile on
          > >the
          > >>front counter and they were promoting it. I bought it immediately
          > (somehow
          > >>expecting something as good as The Golden Compass (nee Northern Lights)),
          > >and read
          > >>it immediately, being rather disappointed, and especially sorry when soon
          > >after I
          > >>saw it deeply discounted at Barnes & Noble and/or Borders. Now maybe it
          > >wasn't
          > >>promoted with huge ads in the newspapers and beautiful posters, but I ask
          > >you
          > >>(someone can forward this to Jane Yolen or Sherwood Smith or Kara Dalkey)
          > >what
          > >>other recent children's fantasies have been on the counters of the local
          > >bookstores
          > >>and deeply discounted at Borders? When they published Harry Potter they
          > >can't have
          > >>been expecting it would be the best-selling release ever, but they were
          > >clearly
          > >>expecting sales above Jane Yolen's for "Young Merlin" or _Wizard's Hall_,
          > >or
          > >>Sherwood Smith's for the "Crown & Court Duet" or Kara Dalkey's for the
          > >_Little
          > >>Sister_ books.
          > >>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

          --
          Dr. Theodore James Sherman, Editor
          Mythlore: A Journal of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams and
          Mythopoeic Literature
          Box X041, Department of English
          Middle Tennessee State University
          Murfreesboro, TN 37132
          615 898-5836; FAX 615 898-5098
          tsherman@...
          tedsherman@...
        • alexeik@aol.com
          In a message dated 8/10/0 12:25:33 AM, Sophie wrote:
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
            In a message dated 8/10/0 12:25:33 AM, Sophie wrote:

            <<I agree with you about his books not really being for children-theyare
            certainly for a much older audience than HP. However, my feeling is that
            Rowling is like a kind of modern Lewis, whose Narnia-like series is for
            children under 14; and Pullman like a modern Tolkien, for much older kids
            and adults, like LOTR.
            >>

            I also agree with this, and think that the complete _His Dark Materials_
            should more fittingly be nominated for the Adult MFA rather than the
            children's fantasy list.
            Alexei
          • Stolzi@aol.com
            In a message dated 8/9/00 3:53:30 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Well, GC is not as well known out there. Your children are going to hear about Harry Potter,
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
              In a message dated 8/9/00 3:53:30 PM Central Daylight Time,
              chowlett@... writes:

              > Also blowing my mind: the reaction of some real
              > conservative Christians to HP - really negative - compared to reactions to
              > GC - not a peep!

              Well, GC is not as well known out there. Your children are going to hear
              about Harry Potter, and you are too, probably, whatever you do, unless you
              homeschool, live on a farm and turn off radio and TV.

              > But I found quite a lot of anti-clericalism in the second
              > volume of GC, enough to make me wonder about the writer's motivation.

              You're not the only one out here wondering. More than anti-clericalism, even
              - it seems Lord Asriel is mounting a war against =God=.

              Plug for BUTTERBUR'S WOODSHED - we're going to discuss the Pullman trilogy as
              one of our subjects this year.

              Mary S
            • Bill
              GOLDEN COMPASS was released with a push in the bookselling industry by Random House,but not so much general advertising. The main emphasis was that GC was,
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
                GOLDEN COMPASS was released with a push in the bookselling industry by
                Random House,but not so much general advertising. The main emphasis was that
                GC was, like Lewis, a book transcending age categories and not just a
                "kids' book". At Borders one edition is in the YA department while the
                other is in the SF/Fantasy section.
              • David Lenander
                Allow me to point out that I was comparing the publishers promotions for these books, and the fact that the similar push misled me into expecting similar
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
                  Allow me to point out that I was comparing the publishers' promotions for these
                  books, and the fact that the similar push misled me into expecting
                  similar books. But, not only did _Northern Lights_/_The Golden Compass_ win
                  the Carnegie Medal for children's literature, I really don't think it's any
                  darker than a number of other children's books. And children's books as a
                  category often includes "young adult" fiction for teen-agers. The plot
                  certainly wasn't unduly complicated--look at books like _Amy's Eyes_ or many of
                  Diana Wynne Jones' or Margaret Mahy's books, or John Verney's _Ismo_ and _Seven
                  Sunflower Seeds_ or some of Ellen Raskin's. Similarly, Jones and Mahy and such
                  other writers as Gregory Maguire or George Mendoza or Jane Yolen or Roald Dahol
                  can get pretty dark.

                  As for the comparisons to C.S. Lewis and Tolkien, I read _The Hobbit_ in third
                  grade, and many of the second-graders in my daughter's class were reading "The
                  Lord of the Rings," though she is still somewhere in _The Two Towers_ before
                  starting 5th grade. Most of her public school 4th grade classmates have read
                  the required text _Lion, Witch and Wardrobe_ (the first Harry Potter book was
                  read aloud in class), and many have finished the series (both, that is, Narnia
                  and the Potter books so far). Claire read the ethically complex and subtle
                  _Jackaroe_ and many of those cheap horror books this year, and while I think
                  "His Dark Materials" to complex for her as yet, I think she'll be ready by the
                  time she's a couple of years older. Just now she's reading several books,
                  Stevenson's _Kidnapped_, which is really over her head, she's lost in the
                  dialect, history and politics, though won't admit this; Walter Brooks' _Freddy
                  the Detective_, and Tamora Pierce's _Briar's Book_ (Circle of Magic #4); and
                  just finished Diane Duane's _So You Want to Be a Wizard_. Oh, and the
                  aforementioned Tolkien, but she hasn't returned to that in a while. I really
                  think the Susan Cooper Dark Is Rising books are ethically objectionable, and
                  rather complex, and would prefer that she wait on reading them, but I allowed
                  her to borrow the audiotapes for listening on our trip to Hawaii next week for
                  Mythcon. I think they are almost as dark as anything we've seen in Pullman so
                  far. Le Guin can get pretty dark, too, in her children's books. Or consider
                  William Mayne or Alan Garner. I read their books in 6th grade or so. I really
                  think that although the Narnia books may be read by younger readers than The
                  Lord of the Rings that they may be at least as demanding or complex for even
                  older readers in terms of the issues raised and the background required. I
                  wouldn't assign them to 5th graders and LotR to 9lth graders and figure that
                  I've settled the appropriate age question. And aside from its length (really,
                  no worse than such other books as Burnett's _The Secret Garden_) I actually
                  think it's easier for children younger than the Narnia readers. As much as
                  Claire liked _Jackaroe_ I'm not at all displeased that she hasn't rushed into
                  reading the even more ambiguous and demanding sequels, _On Fortune's Wheel_ and
                  so on--I really don't think she's ready to really appreciate or benefit from
                  them. But I hope that she will read them in a couple of years. --David
                  Lenander

                  Christine Howlett wrote:

                  > I'm puzzled at how many people compare the Potter books to Golden Compass.
                  > Having read and enjoyed both, I wouldn't have thought they were in the same
                  > ballpark, frankly. But then I'm still surprised that GC is recommended for
                  > *children*; I found the plot rather complicated and the story quite dark
                  > even in the first volume.
                • Sophie Masson
                  True. I think there s a strong element of Gnosticism. Will be interesting to see the 3rd one! Sophie Author site:
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 9, 2000
                    True. I think there's a strong element of Gnosticism. Will be interesting to
                    see the 3rd one!
                    Sophie
                    Author site:
                    http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Ted Sherman <tedsherman@...>
                    To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
                    Date: Thursday, 10 August 2000 10:16
                    Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion


                    >Pullman may not be antireligious, but comments he has made in various
                    venues
                    >(interviews primarily) do suggest a rather hostile attitude to
                    >traditional/orthodox Christianity. Keep in mind that His Dark Materials is
                    >Paradise Lost rewritten for the late 20th century and for an adolescent
                    audience
                    >(I'm not making this up, these are Pullman's words from interviews). And he
                    has
                    >a rather interesting (nice bland adjective there, but I don't want to
                    >characterize his thoughts/beliefs further) take on the Fall (both the
                    historic
                    >one [for those who believe in the Fall] and the poetic one in Paradise
                    Lost).
                    >
                    >I'm eagerly awaiting The Amber Spyglass, which I have assigned (with the
                    other
                    >two Dark Materials novels) to my fantasy lit students this fall. I'm also,
                    to
                    >follow the trend crowd ;), assigning the first three HP books, along with
                    >MacDonald's Short Stories, The Tolkien Reader, and Till We Have Faces.
                    >
                    >As Margaret Dean said earlier, I'm somewhat surprised at the comparison of
                    the
                    >HP books to Pullman's. They're apples and oranges and you can't compare
                    them,
                    >just as you can't compare the Narnia books with The Lord of the Rings.
                    >
                    >Ted
                    >
                    >Sophie Masson wrote:
                    >
                    >> I think the third volume, The Amber Spyglass, does address many of these
                    >> concerns. I know Philip reasonably well, and know that his perspective is
                    >> not anti-religious at all--but the working out of his story, based on
                    >> Milton's Paradise LOst(where of course Lucifer appears as a kind of hero,
                    at
                    >> least at first)demanded the kinds of explorations he's done.
                    >> I agree with you about his books not really being for children-theyare
                    >> certainly for a much older audience than HP. However, my feeling is that
                    >> Rowling is like a kind of modern Lewis, whose Narnia-like series is for
                    >> children under 14; and Pullman like a modern Tolkien, for much older kids
                    >> and adults, like LOTR.
                    >> Sophie
                    >> Author site:
                    >> http://members.xoom.com/sophiecastel/default.htm
                    >>
                    >> -----Original Message-----
                    >> From: Christine Howlett <chowlett@...>
                    >> To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
                    >> Date: Thursday, 10 August 2000 6:47
                    >> Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion
                    >>
                    >> >I'm puzzled at how many people compare the Potter books to Golden
                    Compass.
                    >> >Having read and enjoyed both, I wouldn't have thought they were in the
                    same
                    >> >ballpark, frankly. But then I'm still surprised that GC is recommended
                    for
                    >> >*children*; I found the plot rather complicated and the story quite dark
                    >> >even in the first volume. I wouldn't hand the second volume to a child
                    at
                    >> >all. A 15 - 16 year old could probably read and enjoy (if that's the
                    >> word).
                    >> >The Potter books I would feel fine about giving to any kid who could
                    cope
                    >> >with the vocabulary - 9, 10 year olds anyway. Though I found lots to
                    >> enjoy
                    >> >in them myself. Also blowing my mind: the reaction of some real
                    >> >conservative Christians to HP - really negative - compared to reactions
                    to
                    >> >GC - not a peep! But I found quite a lot of anti-clericalism in the
                    second
                    >> >volume of GC, enough to make me wonder about the writer's motivation.
                    I'm
                    >> >not really looking forward to the last volume, truthfully.
                    >> >
                    >> >Christine
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >-----Original Message-----
                    >> >From: David Lenander <d-lena@...>
                    >> >To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
                    >> >Date: Wednesday, August 09, 2000 3:00 PM
                    >> >Subject: [mythsoc] Potter publisher promotion
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >>I've heard this before, but I know that it's not entirely accurate. I
                    >> >thought that
                    >> >>the Golden Compass had an impressive marketing campaign behind it when
                    I
                    >> >first
                    >> >>heard of the book, it was on a big display at Barnes & Noble. But I'd
                    >> been
                    >> >hearing
                    >> >>about Harry Potter before the book was pubilshed in America as the
                    great
                    >> >new
                    >> >>fantasy. There were signs up about its coming at my local bookstore
                    >> BEFORE
                    >> >it was
                    >> >>published, and when I saw it at that bookstore first, it was a big pile
                    on
                    >> >the
                    >> >>front counter and they were promoting it. I bought it immediately
                    >> (somehow
                    >> >>expecting something as good as The Golden Compass (nee Northern
                    Lights)),
                    >> >and read
                    >> >>it immediately, being rather disappointed, and especially sorry when
                    soon
                    >> >after I
                    >> >>saw it deeply discounted at Barnes & Noble and/or Borders. Now maybe
                    it
                    >> >wasn't
                    >> >>promoted with huge ads in the newspapers and beautiful posters, but I
                    ask
                    >> >you
                    >> >>(someone can forward this to Jane Yolen or Sherwood Smith or Kara
                    Dalkey)
                    >> >what
                    >> >>other recent children's fantasies have been on the counters of the
                    local
                    >> >bookstores
                    >> >>and deeply discounted at Borders? When they published Harry Potter
                    they
                    >> >can't have
                    >> >>been expecting it would be the best-selling release ever, but they were
                    >> >clearly
                    >> >>expecting sales above Jane Yolen's for "Young Merlin" or _Wizard's
                    Hall_,
                    >> >or
                    >> >>Sherwood Smith's for the "Crown & Court Duet" or Kara Dalkey's for the
                    >> >_Little
                    >> >>Sister_ books.
                    >> >>
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >
                    >> >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                    >> >
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                    >
                    >--
                    >Dr. Theodore James Sherman, Editor
                    >Mythlore: A Journal of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams and
                    >Mythopoeic Literature
                    >Box X041, Department of English
                    >Middle Tennessee State University
                    >Murfreesboro, TN 37132
                    >615 898-5836; FAX 615 898-5098
                    >tsherman@...
                    >tedsherman@...
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                    >
                  • LSolarion@aol.com
                    In a message dated 08/09/2000 10:08:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time, d-lena@tc.umn.edu writes:
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 15, 2000
                      In a message dated 08/09/2000 10:08:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
                      d-lena@... writes:

                      << I really
                      think the Susan Cooper Dark Is Rising books are ethically objectionable, >>

                      Really? I haven't read them in years, but I recall no ethical problems except
                      that the "Dark" is all too external, embodied solely in dark characters too
                      one-sided and too easily defeated. But I would classify these as more
                      aesthetic than ethical problems.
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