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Fw: Norwegian Rune Find

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  • Michael Cunningham
    Greetings, (I thought some folk may be interested to hear of this find. It was kept quiet until the initial press release on 1st / 2nd October - I ve updated
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 7, 2009
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      Greetings,
       
      (I thought some folk may be interested to hear of this find. It was kept quiet until the initial press release on 1st / 2nd October - I've updated my original circulation with a partial transliteration of the inscription and a link to an image of the stone. The stone is thought be linked in context to a grave. The area is archaeologically known for being a funerary site)

      Both Jim Knirk and Terje Spurkland, along with James Creakey from the Museum of Cultural History and University of Oslo are examining a new rune find. The stone bearing the runes was discovered about a week ago in situ in the garden of Arnfinn and Bjørg Kirsten Henriksen of Hogganvik.

      The agreement of the runologists, at the moment, is that the nature of the find is very rare because this stone bears what appears to be that of the futhark. Now known as the Hogganvik-rock it has between 60 and 70 visible characters. This may compare with the Tune stone in Sarpsborg which has an estimated 100. James Creaky who has, so far, spent most time examining the characters is satisfied that they represent a male who is named along with his character and profession - but further transliteration is undeniable.

      At the moment the stone is secured in situ and may be later moved for better examination - this may take place sooner rather than later if the weather deteriorates. A more in-depth press release has been held back until tomorrow, but if this is not the case I hope to be in a position to offer some more information.
       
      --- I now have a rough copy of the inscription: The stone has 63 runes with 60 clear to attempts at primary transliteration giving -
       
      EkNaudigastir and Ekaraf(a)r
       
      on the two upper horizontal lines, belived to be a memorial context.
       
      Further excavation of the site is in the advanced stages of planning.
       
      The stone can be viewed at:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/43186023@N07/
       

      Cheers,
      Michael


      'Archaeologists have a good life. They go all over the world, seeking lost and forgotten civilizations. Now [...] that's a profession for you.'
      - Robert E. Howard circa 1935
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