Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] L'Engle

Expand Messages
  • David Bratman
    ... Fascinating. Little did I know, when having the already impressive experience of speaking with L Engle at the 1994 Mythcon, that there was now only one
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 29, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
      >I was surprised to find two
      >photographs provided courtesy of Madeleine L'Engle, one of which
      >included a teen-aged M.L. herself. Checking the index, I discovered
      >that the L'Engles were next-door neighbors to the Dos Passos family, I
      >think in the early 1930s.

      Fascinating. Little did I know, when having the already impressive experience of speaking with L'Engle at the 1994 Mythcon, that there was now only one person between me and John Dos Passos.

      I am still hoping some day to find again the book I once saw including a photo of Lord Dunsany, barefoot with his pants legs rolled up, as I recall, on the beach with a group of children who were either relatives or family friends. The caption indicated that he was known to the children as Uncle Eddie.
    • John D Rateliff
      ... If there s any specific Dos Passos novel you d recommend (MANHATTAN TRANSFER? U.S.A.?), I d be interested in hearing. ... Hmm. Haven t seen that, and wd
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 30, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        On Jul 29, 2009, at 10:49 PM, David Bratman wrote:
        > Fascinating. Little did I know, when having the already impressive
        > experience of speaking with L'Engle at the 1994 Mythcon, that there
        > was now only one person between me and John Dos Passos.

        If there's any specific Dos Passos novel you'd recommend (MANHATTAN
        TRANSFER? U.S.A.?), I'd be interested in hearing.


        > I am still hoping some day to find again the book I once saw
        > including a photo of Lord Dunsany, barefoot with his pants legs
        > rolled up, as I recall, on the beach with a group of children who
        > were either relatives or family friends. The caption indicated that
        > he was known to the children as Uncle Eddie.


        Hmm. Haven't seen that, and wd be interested in it if it ever turns up
        again. Probably one of the Pakenhams, who were Lady Beatrice's nieces
        and nephews (one of whom, Lady Mary Clive, was still alive two years
        ago, when she was celebrating her 100th birthday). Antonia Fraser is
        the daughter of one of them, but I forget which one. They were a
        literary lot, so I'm not sure which memoir by which of them, or which
        biography of which one, might be the place. But I suspect that's where
        to look.
        Another lost Dunsany reference comes from Taum, who told me he
        once was paging through an account of someone on safari in Africa in
        the twenties that included running into Dunsany in Nairobi or some
        such place -- but he couldn't tell me the author, or title, or date,
        or specific subject of the book.
        Sadly, I was never able to find out if Dunsany read THE LORD OF
        THE RINGS -- he lived just long enough to have done so, but if he did
        there's no record of it. He did read Lovecraft's pastiches of his
        work, but only discovered them in the last years of his life, long
        after Lovecraft was dead. Pity they never invited him to an
        Inklings . . .

        --John R.
      • Lynn Maudlin
        Wow, I love the account of L Engle s mother, although I don t think I d call it bossiness (presumption, maybe? Of course she may well have been very bossy;
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 3, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Wow, I love the account of L'Engle's mother, although I don't think I'd call it "bossiness" (presumption, maybe? Of course she may well have been very bossy; this just doesn't strike me as an example of that trait).

          -- Lynn --


          --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, John D Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:
          >
          > I came across a passing reference to Madeleine L'Engle this past
          > weekend that I thought her fans, of which there are many in the
          > society, might find interesting. Janice and I were on a visit to
          > Whidbey Island and the inn where we were staying had a library, mainly
          > made up I think of books abandoned by previous guests over the last
          > eighty years. One such book was a rather battered copy of a biography
          > of John Dos Passos, which I dipped into because he's one once-
          > prominent American writer about whom I know almost nothing. After
          > reading accounts of his quarrels with Edmund Wilson in the early 1960s
          > (in which my sympathies were, surprisingly enough, mainly with Wilson)
          > and with Hemingway during the Spanish Civil War (in which I think Dos
          > Passos came out the better of the two), I was surprised to find two
          > photographs provided courtesy of Madeleine L'Engle, one of which
          > included a teen-aged M.L. herself. Checking the index, I discovered
          > that the L'Engles were next-door neighbors to the Dos Passos family, I
          > think in the early 1930s. There's a brief description of L'Engle's
          > mother, and how much Dos Passos disliked her bossiness (he once came
          > downstairs to find she'd walked into his house without knocking.
          > Seeing him, Mrs. L'Engle remarked that she didn't think his house was
          > as awful as people said, then left).
          >
          > Anyway, if anybody cares to follow up on this, the book in question
          > is DOS PASSOS: A LIFE by Virginia Spencer Carr [1984].
          >
          > --John R.
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.