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Re: [mythsoc] Harry Potter, an 11 year old view

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  • David S. Bratman
    I was writing pretty much like that when I was 11. And that s not boasting: I m sure most of us here were. I don t think there s anything wrong with objecting
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 2, 2000
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      I was writing pretty much like that when I was 11. And that's not
      boasting: I'm sure most of us here were.

      I don't think there's anything wrong with objecting to mixed moral
      messages and squeamy situations. The kid has a point. I followed him
      right up until he recommended Redwall. Oh well, nobody's perfect.

      David Bratman
    • Steve Schaper
      ... Musta been home-schooled. Or born on a leap-day ;-) ==================================== sschaper@uswest.net members.delphi.com/sschaper/web/sschaper.html
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 2, 2000
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        At 2:20 PM -0500 8/2/00, Ted Sherman wrote:
        >And we're supposed to believe the writing below is that of an
        >American 11-year old.
        >I have 21-year olds who don't write half as well in my college (and graduate!)
        >courses!
        >
        >Ted


        Musta been home-schooled.

        Or born on a leap-day ;-)

        ====================================

        sschaper@...
        members.delphi.com/sschaper/web/sschaper.html
        ====================================
      • Christine Howlett
        From the vantage point of 40+ years, the mixed messages really did not bother me. The people seemed quite real, as versus cardboard saints. The villains
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 2, 2000
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          From the vantage point of 40+ years, the 'mixed messages' really did not
          bother me. The people seemed quite real, as versus cardboard saints. The
          villains are less mixed - it's hard to find a redeeming trait in most of
          them, though I notice the 4th book has a 'villain' who is simply weak and
          willing to delude himself (that's not a spoiler, is it?). My roommate says
          11 is appropriate to object to mixed good-bad types. I think an 11 year old
          must have met some pretty mixed types already. Like his parents, his
          siblings, his neighbors, his teachers, etc. etc. Humanity being a pretty
          mixed lot. Oh well, different countries heard from.
          Christine

          -----Original Message-----
          From: David S. Bratman <dbratman@...>
          To: mythsoc@egroups.com <mythsoc@egroups.com>
          Date: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 3:48 PM
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Harry Potter, an 11 year old view


          >I was writing pretty much like that when I was 11. And that's not
          >boasting: I'm sure most of us here were.
          >
          >I don't think there's anything wrong with objecting to mixed moral
          >messages and squeamy situations. The kid has a point. I followed him
          >right up until he recommended Redwall. Oh well, nobody's perfect.
          >
          >David Bratman
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          >
        • David S. Bratman
          There s a difference between mixed good/bad people and mixed moral messages. _The Lord of the Rings_, for instance, has the former but not the latter. Good
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 2, 2000
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            There's a difference between mixed good/bad people and mixed moral
            messages. _The Lord of the Rings_, for instance, has the former but not
            the latter. "Good and evil have not changed since yesterday," Aragorn
            says (approx. quote), "nor are they one thing among elves and dwarves and
            another among men."

            I've also seen a lot of fantasies that seem to have mixed moral messages
            but black-and-white characters.

            IMHO, it is more important for authors to show that their characters are
            human, with flaws and less-than-pure desires and impulses, than to show
            their postmodern (or whatever) sensibility by demonstrating that good and
            bad are not absolute. At least for some readers, Tolkien and Lewis are
            demonstrations that you can have absolute black-and-white moral messages
            without rigid situations or cardboard characters.

            David Bratman
          • Mary Kay Kare
            ... You think there are Satanic references in Harry Potter? That s what he said. MKK
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 4, 2000
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              "David S. Bratman" wrote:
              >
              > I was writing pretty much like that when I was 11. And that's not
              > boasting: I'm sure most of us here were.
              >
              > I don't think there's anything wrong with objecting to mixed moral
              > messages and squeamy situations. The kid has a point. I followed him
              > right up until he recommended Redwall. Oh well, nobody's perfect.
              >
              You think there are Satanic references in Harry Potter? That's what
              he said.

              MKK
            • WendellWag@aol.com
              In a message dated 8/4/00 1:10:08 PM Eastern Daylight Time, kare@sirius.com writes: Yeah, there
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 5, 2000
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                In a message dated 8/4/00 1:10:08 PM Eastern Daylight Time, kare@...
                writes:

                << You think there are Satanic references in Harry Potter? >>

                Yeah, there are, but you got to look for them in the same way that people
                look for messages in rock music. Look at the sixth sentence of the sixth
                paragraph of the sixth chapter of the first book. (666 - get it?) Reading
                backward from the end of the sentence and taking every sixth letter, you get
                "All power to our Lord Satan. Sacrifice our parents on his altar." Using
                techniques like this on other sections of the Harry Potter books, I've also
                found "Paul is dead," "Turn me on, dead man," "I buried Paul," "Kilroy was
                here," "Whazzup?," "Louie, Louie, me gotta go," "Who is Keyser Sose?," and
                "Toynbee ideas in Kubrick's 2001, resurrect dead on planet Jupiter."

                Am I the only one who's noticed this?

                Wendell Wagner
              • Stolzi@aol.com
                In a message dated 8/5/00 12:07:43 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Why not the sixth book?
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 5, 2000
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                  In a message dated 8/5/00 12:07:43 PM Central Daylight Time,
                  WendellWag@... writes:

                  > Look at the sixth sentence of the sixth
                  > paragraph of the sixth chapter of the first book. (666 - get it?)

                  Why not the sixth book?
                • WendellWag@aol.com
                  Well, we haven t seen the sixth book yet. Perhaps the *real* meaning will be revealed there.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 5, 2000
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                    Well, we haven't seen the sixth book yet. Perhaps the *real* meaning will be
                    revealed there.
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