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Re: [mythsoc] Interesting item in an article in _The Washington Post_

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  • David S. Bratman
    ... For some reason I read radiorating as a variant of rotating , and imagine Lewis spinning in place. No wonder he gave it up. Time-ese was, thank
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 2, 2000
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      On Tue, 1 Aug 2000 Stolzi@... wrote:

      > And only one TIME-ism that I noted. The magazine was known back then for its
      > "snappy" word coinages (most of them pretty ghastly) and in this article it
      > says that Lewis "has given up radiorating." (radio - orating, blech)

      For some reason I read "radiorating" as a variant of "rotating", and
      imagine Lewis spinning in place. No wonder he gave it up.

      Time-ese was, thank goodness, already dying out by 1947. It was a bizarre
      dialect, vaguely based on the abbreviated language called "telegraphese"
      which journalists used to master to save on by-the-word charges when
      sending dispatches by telegram back to the office. Some newspapers and
      magazines would print the dispatches that way, and the style became
      associated with "snappy" journalism. Time - founded in 1923, the height
      of the "Front Page" era - then took it up deliberately, even when it
      wasn't economically necessary.

      Time-ese had a peculiar grammar as well as an abbreviated vocabulary. My
      favorite example comes from an article about Time which The New Yorker
      published in the mid-30s: the content was utterly straight, but the
      article was written _in_ a parody of Time-ese. This was their
      description of Time-ese itself: "Backward ran sentences until reeled the
      mind."

      This type of writing, and its companion of sloppy thinking, probably
      contributed more to Lewis's dislike of journalism than the personal
      intrusiveness which is more characteristic of journalism today than it was
      then. (There were other factors as well, of course.) I do not recall
      reading anything about why Lewis consented to be profiled by Time, or his
      reaction to the result: though words like "radiorator" would make the
      lowliest English teacher's teeth ache, let alone Lewis's.

      But I am fond of Tolkien's comment on the occasion of a newspaper
      columnist calling CSL "Ascetic Mr. Lewis." Tolkien said "I ask you! He
      put away three pints in a very short session we had this morning, and said
      he was 'going short for Lent.'" (Tolkien's Letters, no. 56)

      David Bratman
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      Here s the letter I ve just sent to The Washington Post: To the editors: In an article on page A7 of the July 24, 2000 issue, you write that as a memento of a
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 5, 2000
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        Here's the letter I've just sent to The Washington Post:

        To the editors:

        In an article on page A7 of the July 24, 2000 issue, you write that as a
        memento of a meeting, George W. Bush "dug up" and sent to a Wheaton College
        professor a copy of a Time magazine cover showing C. S. Lewis. My first
        reaction was that it's impossible to just casually dig up this issue (which
        is from September 8, 1947). In over twenty-five years of reading and
        casually collecting Lewis's works, I've never seen a copy of it. It's not
        that the issue is really rare. Lots of libraries have complete sets of Time
        magazine, but I'll assume that Bush didn't steal the copy from a library.
        It's not the sort of thing that can be found by casually searching used
        bookstores though, and I assumed that it would take paying a dealer to do an
        extensive (and rather expensive) search if one wanted a copy.

        I asked people on an E-mail mailing list I belong to just how hard it would
        be to find this issue. To my surprise, one person was able to suggest a
        fairly simple way to obtain a copy. He did a search on the Internet on
        dealers of used Time magazines. He found quite a few of them and E-mailed
        them all asking if they had the issue. Several of them did, and he was able
        to buy a copy for only four dollars. So I conclude that it's not that
        difficult to obtain the issue with the C. S. Lewis cover now that we have the
        Internet. But then, we have Al Gore to thank for that, right?

        Sincerely,
        Wendell Wagner, Jr.

        Anyway, I won't be leaving till the 13th, but for those who are leaving this
        week, have a nice trip and I'll see you at Mythcon.
      • Ted Sherman
        Uh, Wendell, what s the point? Ted PS: I won t be at MythCon this year--don t want to get too near the Cracks of Doom! ... -- Dr. Theodore James Sherman,
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 5, 2000
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          Uh, Wendell, what's the point?

          Ted

          PS: I won't be at MythCon this year--don't want to get too near the Cracks of
          Doom!

          WendellWag@... wrote:

          > Here's the letter I've just sent to The Washington Post:
          >
          > To the editors:
          >
          > In an article on page A7 of the July 24, 2000 issue, you write that as a
          > memento of a meeting, George W. Bush "dug up" and sent to a Wheaton College
          > professor a copy of a Time magazine cover showing C. S. Lewis. My first
          > reaction was that it's impossible to just casually dig up this issue (which
          > is from September 8, 1947). In over twenty-five years of reading and
          > casually collecting Lewis's works, I've never seen a copy of it. It's not
          > that the issue is really rare. Lots of libraries have complete sets of Time
          > magazine, but I'll assume that Bush didn't steal the copy from a library.
          > It's not the sort of thing that can be found by casually searching used
          > bookstores though, and I assumed that it would take paying a dealer to do an
          > extensive (and rather expensive) search if one wanted a copy.
          >
          > I asked people on an E-mail mailing list I belong to just how hard it would
          > be to find this issue. To my surprise, one person was able to suggest a
          > fairly simple way to obtain a copy. He did a search on the Internet on
          > dealers of used Time magazines. He found quite a few of them and E-mailed
          > them all asking if they had the issue. Several of them did, and he was able
          > to buy a copy for only four dollars. So I conclude that it's not that
          > difficult to obtain the issue with the C. S. Lewis cover now that we have the
          > Internet. But then, we have Al Gore to thank for that, right?
          >
          > Sincerely,
          > Wendell Wagner, Jr.
          >
          > Anyway, I won't be leaving till the 13th, but for those who are leaving this
          > week, have a nice trip and I'll see you at Mythcon.
          >
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

          --
          Dr. Theodore James Sherman, Editor
          Mythlore: A Journal of J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams and
          Mythopoeic Literature
          Box X041, Department of English
          Middle Tennessee State University
          Murfreesboro, TN 37132
          615 898-5836; FAX 615 898-5098
          tsherman@...
          tedsherman@...
        • WendellWag@aol.com
          In a message dated 8/5/00 7:41:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, tedsherman@home.com writes:
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 5, 2000
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            In a message dated 8/5/00 7:41:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            tedsherman@... writes:

            << Uh, Wendell, what's the point? >>

            I don't know. Maybe nothing.
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